Author Topic: Back to Basics  (Read 16079 times)

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #32 on: December 12, 2022, 19:00:29 pm »
90v peak to peak?
How about the amps?


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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #33 on: December 15, 2022, 00:05:20 am »
Amperage is absolute minimum with such short periods. <200mA max, but as low as 5-10mA in certain cases which are inversely proportionate with gate offtime.

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #34 on: December 26, 2022, 11:25:06 am »
Amperage is absolute minimum with such short periods. <200mA max, but as low as 5-10mA in certain cases which are inversely proportionate with gate offtime.

Is this peak? RMS? How are you measuring it?

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #35 on: March 08, 2023, 16:37:12 pm »
I believe you want to charge up the cell using voltage LESS THAN what is needed to achieve electrolysis.  This is the only way to get a charge on the cell. Once the cell is charged, only then should the high voltage pulse hit it to liberate the charge.  If you keep hitting it with +electrolysis voltage, that's all you're going to get. The coils should be opposing reach other and tuned appropriately.  This limits it to charging as the fields cancel each other out.   If tuned right, this also helps keep the initial voltage low.  This would start the process.  Once you get the cell charged to where you want it, then up the voltage and retune resonance to up the voltage so high spikes crack all the water that has already been charged below electrolysis voltage.

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #36 on: March 09, 2023, 18:38:30 pm »
Yes, I agree. Duty Cycle Pulses were Stan's method of controlling this sustained polarization and bursting amplitudes.

Also, most people never realize the great inhibition on tuning pulses and core saturation, that a percentage based duty cycle adjustment causes. All your signal generators are flawed, making it nearly impossible to tune replications of Stan's circuits due to all the differences in the VIC Matrix caused by parasitics and ideal vs real component behaviors.

Only having independent width and spacing control circumvents this flaw. I'm writing an article on my research on this subject that I will share sometime soon. :)

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #37 on: March 10, 2023, 08:29:46 am »
I believe you want to charge up the cell using voltage LESS THAN what is needed to achieve electrolysis.  This is the only way to get a charge on the cell. Once the cell is charged, only then should the high voltage pulse hit it to liberate the charge.  If you keep hitting it with +electrolysis voltage, that's all you're going to get. The coils should be opposing reach other and tuned appropriately.  This limits it to charging as the fields cancel each other out.   If tuned right, this also helps keep the initial voltage low.  This would start the process.  Once you get the cell charged to where you want it, then up the voltage and retune resonance to up the voltage so high spikes crack all the water that has already been charged below electrolysis voltage.

I have this belief too.. somehow I believe when Stan talk about the cell working like a short circuit is about making the minimum required voltage become zero at some point and even reversed!


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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #38 on: March 10, 2023, 08:33:07 am »
Yes, I agree. Duty Cycle Pulses were Stan's method of controlling this sustained polarization and bursting amplitudes.

Also, most people never realize the great inhibition on tuning pulses and core saturation, that a percentage based duty cycle adjustment causes. All your signal generators are flawed, making it nearly impossible to tune replications of Stan's circuits due to all the differences in the VIC Matrix caused by parasitics and ideal vs real component behaviors.

Only having independent width and spacing control circumvents this flaw. I'm writing an article on my research on this subject that I will share sometime soon. :)

What you mean? With flawed signal generators? What would make it impossible to tune? To have mark space is not hard… even the pll can be made to have variable duty cycle… the fracture cell also Is some very good for the abilities


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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #39 on: March 10, 2023, 10:34:01 am »
Yes, I agree. Duty Cycle Pulses were Stan's method of controlling this sustained polarization and bursting amplitudes.

Also, most people never realize the great inhibition on tuning pulses and core saturation, that a percentage based duty cycle adjustment causes. All your signal generators are flawed, making it nearly impossible to tune replications of Stan's circuits due to all the differences in the VIC Matrix caused by parasitics and ideal vs real component behaviors.

Only having independent width and spacing control circumvents this flaw. I'm writing an article on my research on this subject that I will share sometime soon. :)

I dont know. Stan has the 7490 I.C in the circuit. this chip divides frequency and outputs a 50-50 duty cycle, so he never adjusted duty cycle in the high frequency signal, he only adjusts the gate (low freq signal) pulse and width. In the images where the primary signal is round and stretched is the result of transformer action only, not electronics.

So far, I never saw someone increasing the voltage at the cell with decreasing current at the same time. More voltage = morre current, always, thats ohms law. If you apply a HV pulse, current will flow based on the cell resistance.