Author Topic: Back to Basics  (Read 16083 times)

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #104 on: December 16, 2023, 02:26:29 am »
Check this out.


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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #105 on: December 16, 2023, 14:50:41 pm »
Yes thats very interesting… and is the reason i believe we must keep the impedance of the bifilar really down to get power into the cell or to match to it.since the cell have ver low impedance… and even negative since is a capacitive load!




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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #106 on: December 16, 2023, 15:18:25 pm »
The resistivity of the water is the issue and what needs to be matched to get maximum power across it.

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #107 on: December 17, 2023, 03:41:27 am »
If match to water resistance it's what you want than you could manipulate the ppm until match for example...

Perhaps the impedance of the cell structure is not important as it's very short... only testing to tell

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #108 on: December 17, 2023, 04:47:44 am »
Well, if you think about it, the water is the load on the DC circuit.  Otherwise, like any other capacitor, it would just be an open circuit.

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #109 on: December 17, 2023, 12:52:03 pm »
Well, if you think about it, the water is the load on the DC circuit.  Otherwise, like any other capacitor, it would just be an open circuit.

Thats true! the only part that i still have concern is that the interaction of the coils with the cell since the diode is on the other side should have an ac component..

If we think the cell as Open it will reflect the wave on the same polarity… raising the voltage in and reducing the current in (raise the impedance) (if applying unipolar pulse!!!)


the diode would actually block this reflected positive pulse trapping the wave between the bif coils and cell

on the other side if we take it as a short ckt (having lower impedance than line) it will reflect back the opposite polarity wave making the input hungry for amps (again in the unipolar case)… here the diode just allow more and more to go…

matching the impedance with the cell will make this reflections lower…

changing the ppm of the cell would change its resistance… so you can basically add drop by drop of some diluted acid on the cell and find where the cell have zero reflection…

in the video he talk about the electrons bunching up… just like meyers used to talk about…

something nice comeout of it is that not necessarily  he wires need to be connected to have influence on each other… if you have a positive charge somewhere it will cause a charge redistribution… and voltage is electric field * d… so generating high charge density on both sides of the cell may also be a way to manipulate what is inside of it….

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #110 on: December 17, 2023, 13:09:53 pm »
This is how I see it.

1.  As a DC circuit the impedance must be matched to maximize power transfer.
2.  As an AC circuit at resonance to amplify the voltage that remains after the leakage of the DC current through the cell resistance.

This results in a step charging of impedance matched DC current on the cell.

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #111 on: April 20, 2024, 17:40:51 pm »
Have you ever done the simple resistance measurement of a single tube pair with your coils?  Try this and see what you get.

Use a 5VDC power source.  Put 2 coils in series on side and the third coil on the other side with the single tube pair at the ends.  Know the resistance measurements of your coils first.  I'm assuming they are likely between 70 to 80 like Stan Meyers.  With the voltage on, measure the voltage and current (or calculate the current) on the coils and the tube pair in tap water.  Calculate the resistance of the tube pair using V=IR.  Sum the total resistance values of just the coils and compare to the calculated resistance of the tube pair in water.

See anything interesting?