Author Topic: VIC controller  (Read 24082 times)

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2011, 16:37:26 pm »
Can you explain your last thought a little bit better? I'd like to catch on to your thinking there, because Stan does have a delrin cap on the top of the inner tube of the stacked resonant cavity unit, maybe.

About the + and neg voltage, I do think the water knows the difference between +1000 volts with -1000 volts, (case 1) and... just 0 to +2000 volts (case 2), and the reason is that it's not voltage that matters, but a "difference of charge" which is one step below voltage, and a little more fundamental


(case 1) you can have a piece of metal missing x electrons, compared to a piece of metal that has gained x electrons

(case 2) you can have a piece of metal missing 2x electrons, compared to normal metal that is not charged

now think about the water molecule, Stan talks about q and q', and coulombs law, opposite electrical attraction force, (case 1) gives the proper charge attraction and repulsion required for the forces on the water molecule, while (case 2) does not

also the chokes are a 1:1 mirror, the positive voltage going into the top choke will mirror it's waveform into the bottom choke with an equal and opposite voltage, the negative choke is connected to ground and to the cell, so the voltage put through it is referenced to ground meaning it has to have a negative voltage, in the sense that it actually pushes more electrons into this choke to accumulate the electrons as a charge difference

(case 1) and (case 2) are the same from a voltage point of view, but from a charge point of veiw they are different, and it's the charges we need to look at when targeting the water molecule

my take on it for now, anyway

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2011, 17:26:34 pm »
Donald across the secondary you will see 2kv cause the secondary will be driving the tank, however in the water you will have one plate with very high positive voltage in relation to the ground and than the other plate having alternating voltage in it.


The water charge is what is important i repeat net charge. dielectric proprieties. The vic is important part cause you create a resonant tank that doubles the frequency applied while restricting the amps.


The answer is if water has negative charge it will have more electrons in it, if water is positively charged it will have missing electrons. I think the ph would change.



The negative electrode will flip from -2000 to +2000 relative to the ground because of the resonant tank and the positive will be at maybe 20kv relative to the ground because of the charging pump choke after the diode and the resonant tank that doubles the pulse inducing ever increasing voltage in the pump section....


did you saw my stuff? 
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 17:52:21 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2011, 17:55:26 pm »
@Donald: This is exactly, what I meant. It probably does make a difference, because of the relative potential of the electrodes compared to the water (charge of the water). But it is IMHO important to note, that the whole circuit is according to Don completely isolated (floating). And if one electrode has a much easier ionization than the other, which is actually the case with water, it could well be, that during the process the overall potential (charge) of the water will change. Maybe therefore the gating is needed at the end, to get the water back to neutral? Who knows?


"Last thought" explained: If the outflow gas has any charge left due to the process, and you don't want to waste this charge, you let the outflow go out through the inner tube, for the same reason as above stated, the gas will give then its charge to the inner tube before exiting. But then the end of the inner tube has to be isolated, otherwise the gas could again immediately become ionized, due to the high voltage of the tube (especially at the sharper edges at the end of the tube you would easily get corona discharges at HV). Like that the gas can easily get out of the tube completely neutral, even if the tubes have high voltages.
The other variant could be, that you intentionally ionize the gas at the output. As hydrogen is much lighter, it would rise, and perform work by transporting the ionized gas away -> the remaining circuit would then obviously change its overall potential accordingly.
Quote
The answer is if water has negative charge it will have more electrons in it, if water is positively charged it will have missing electrons. I think the ph would change.
Yes, it would change. But as electrons cannot just float in an electrolyte, it's rather, that if the water is positively charged it has more H3O+ ions and if it's negatively charged it has more OH- ions. Therefore the PH change. But I think the change in PH would be minimal at the voltages proposed here.
It already gets quite offtopic. Sorry Don. Delete if you want to.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2011, 18:11:30 pm by Kali_ma_Amar »

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2011, 17:56:55 pm »
Hello kalli,


I think that you don't really want to stabilize the gas if there is a remained charge in it. You should actually want to keep destabilized, maybe plastic or glass tubing is good for that..

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2011, 19:37:14 pm »
Kali,
I think the discussion of voltage potential in this thread is a good one.I would have to agree with Donald on this one,maybe because I gave him this info a while back,but He expresses it well.
Stan does state the use of attraction and repelling forces working on the water in his process using voltage potential.
 
Now if we have just a positive 2kv on the outside tube and a 0kv on the negative tube there will be no attraction,repelling forces acting on the water.
 
But if we have a positive 1kv on the outside tube and a -1kv on the inside tube,now we have an equal attraction,repelling force working on the water.
 
Now they may be the same thing in the end, but that is just my opinion
Don

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2011, 19:50:59 pm »
Hi,
I second that. If you look carfully to the patents the ultimate goal is removing the covalent bond between the Hydrogen (positivly charged) and the Oxygen (negativly charged). In his lectures Stan explaines that you need a positive and negative voltage potential. Since opposites attracts the hydrogen will be attracted to the negative voltage potential and the oxygen to the positive potential and the bigger the charges the easier the covalent bond will be broken.


Just my 2 cents ...

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #22 on: March 02, 2011, 04:28:33 am »
Kali,
I think the discussion of voltage potential in this thread is a good one.I would have to agree with Donald on this one,maybe because I gave him this info a while back,but He expresses it well.
Stan does state the use of attraction and repelling forces working on the water in his process using voltage potential.
 
Now if we have just a positive 2kv on the outside tube and a 0kv on the negative tube there will be no attraction,repelling forces acting on the water.
 
But if we have a positive 1kv on the outside tube and a -1kv on the inside tube,now we have an equal attraction,repelling force working on the water.
 
Now they may be the same thing in the end, but that is just my opinion
Don




Hi Don,


I will try to explain something to you so you know more about it.. . When you have voltage you have it in reference to something. For example if you have one of the tubes connected to the ground, (earth). Here you have 0v. If you apply a voltage between the plates and the plates are not connected to the ground, automatically water being the reference, they will get equal and opposing voltages the way you said, its right. When you have a voltage you must aways think in reference to what. And than you start to see other capacitances in the way and where the magic is.


Hope you understood. You are correct when you say B+ and B-




My theory says that the outer tubes must be at very high pulsating positive static field B+(maybe the reason for the yellow color) , and the inner tube will have an alternating field from positive kv to negative kv B+- in relation to water reference ground. This in my opinion has the ability for energize the water molecule, double the pulse frequency, switch of the bound and develop high voltages restricting the amps.



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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #23 on: March 02, 2011, 04:57:06 am »
here's a circuit equivalent of the water molecule as explained by Puharich and the frequencies responsible for splitting the water molecule.
(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/ap_water_rep.gif)
(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/ap_freq_diagram1.gif)