Author Topic: increasing voltage across the cells  (Read 3809 times)

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2016, 08:54:07 am »
It depends on where you are measuring the voltage... probably you have less current flow so less voltage drop that you see as an increase... no?

TGS for properly sizing a transformer is not so hard.. basically a big transformer is needed for low frequencies because the number of cycles tells you how many times you can use your core per second...

i usualy take the voltage applied divide by 2 for pulsing 50% than divide by Bmax of the core than divide by the crossectional area of the core and than divide by the frequency... this gives the number of turns...

ferrite is usualy bmax 0,3tesla
area is in square meters
frequency in hertz

the 2 is a factor telling we can use only half of the core flux swing because its not ac... if was square ac it would be 4 and if sinewave it would be 4,44

above this voltage at this frequency the core will saturate with the turns you calculated....

with this simple equation you can develop good transformers already

the gap will allow more energy to be stored for a given design suchthat it will reduce the inductance increasing the current so the energy stored also the gap help avoid saturation...

1Henrie is = to 1volt aplied by one second make a current to go from zero to 1 amp...

« Last Edit: January 05, 2016, 09:09:20 am by sebosfato »

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2016, 18:35:09 pm »
OK, that is all well and good.  Yet can someone here tell me why the voltage increases and the current decreases substantially in my circuit when I add neon bulbs in series from the last cell to ground?

kb

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2016, 18:52:39 pm »
OK, that is all well and good.  Yet can someone here tell me why the voltage increases and the current decreases substantially in my circuit when I add neon bulbs in series from the last cell to ground?

kb

Because you added in more resistance to the system V = √W x Ω.

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2016, 19:16:08 pm »
You dont need it if you do some maths.

I never saw an amp inhibitor so efficient like transformers... think about it...

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2016, 14:32:09 pm »
I was hunting for someone to jump in and explain how neon bulbs with negative resistance when lit can add resistance to the circuit.   

kb

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2016, 18:11:58 pm »
it has an impedance ?

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #14 on: January 06, 2016, 19:36:52 pm »
maybe the neon is working like "spark gap"... or "whatelse"

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2016, 22:37:08 pm »
maybe the neon is working like "spark gap"... or "whatelse"

Exactly