Author Topic: laws of (conservation of energy-thermodynamics-faraday's electrolysis)?  (Read 4005 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 349
hello everyone, first off I would like to say that i'm sorry if this topic was already covered and i can remove it if it was.
 
In a few days I have a meeting with one of my old physics profeser; basicly I am going to try to explain why Stans system doesn't break any of these laws. I think i have a pretty good understaning of each of them and why they are not broken but i want my case to be air tight!
I would like to here everyones input to make sure i'm not missing anything.
thanks
 
ps- and any other laws he may throw at me that I haven't considered
 
 
 
The Law of Conservation of Energy
Energy in a system may take on various forms (e.g. kinetic, potential, heat, light). The law of conservation of energy states that energy may neither be created nor destroyed. Therefore the sum of all the energies in the system is a constant.
Faraday's 1st Law of Electrolysis - The mass of a substance altered at an electrode during electrolysis is directly proportional to the quantity of electricity transferred at that electrode. Quantity of electricity refers to the quantity of electrical charge, typically measured in coulomb.
Faraday's 2nd Law of Electrolysis - For a given quantity of electricity (electric charge), the mass of an elemental material altered at an electrode is directly proportional to the element's equivalent weight. The equivalent weight of a substance is its molar mass divided by an integer that depends on the reaction undergone by the material.
 
First law of thermodynamics
  <blockquote>Energy can be neither created nor destroyed. It can only change forms.</blockquote> <blockquote>In any process in an isolated system, the total energy remains the same.</blockquote> <blockquote>For a</blockquote>thermodynamic cycle the net heat supplied to the system equals the net work done by the system.   Second law of thermodynamics <blockquote>When two</blockquote>isolated systems in separate but nearby regions of space, each in thermodynamic equilibrium in itself, but not in equilibrium with each other at first, are at some time allowed to interact, breaking the isolation that separates the two systems, and they exchange matter or energy, they will eventually reach a mutual thermodynamic equilibrium. The sum of the entropies of the initial, isolated systems is less than or equal to the entropy of the final exchanging systems. In the process of reaching a new thermodynamic equilibrium, entropy has increased, or at least has not decreased <blockquote></blockquote> <blockquote></blockquote>

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 270
Re: laws of (conservation of energy-thermodynamics-faraday's electrolysis)?
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2011, 06:39:07 am »
If I were to have a tank of hydrogen and a tank of oxygen and I was able to positively ionize the two gasses making the atoms less in mass(removing electrons) before ignition or oxidation, would the thermal energy of the combustion be increased or decreased?

O+ + H+ = ?

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 349
Re: laws of (conservation of energy-thermodynamics-faraday's electrolysis)?
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2011, 16:26:36 pm »
it would increase, correct? By decreasing the amount of electrons, the three atoms when ignited will keep realeasing energy as they try to stablize. This will go on untill h20 is formed, another structure is formed, or the atoms implode which would release great amounts of energy. At least this is what stan said is happening. I think this process relates to Einstein's nuclear physics but I've never looked into it.   

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 980
Re: laws of (conservation of energy-thermodynamics-faraday's electrolysis)?
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2011, 22:05:39 pm »
if you want to hit it with a chemistry perspective, then check out 
1. auto-ionization of water
2. le chatelier's principle
3. collision theory


also, think about this document:

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 349
Re: laws of (conservation of energy-thermodynamics-faraday's electrolysis)?
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2011, 02:24:01 am »
today I had my meeting with my professer. Before we got into it he was pretty certain that meyers systems violated all the laws that I have listed above. A few hours later he couldn't find a way that it violates any of them.  :)