Author Topic: Back to Basics  (Read 3237 times)

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #24 on: September 14, 2022, 12:31:27 pm »
This is my water cell. Seems to act like a capacitor to me.

If you check the current, it will have the same waveform, it wont be a capacitor current waveform.

https://industrial.panasonic.com/content/data/common/ss-files/tech14-06_ww.png

Your waveform is only a result of Icell x Rcell. It looks like a charging capacitor because the inductors are lagging the current, and the current, multiplied by the resistance of the cell, gives you this waveform. But this waveform is only the inductor current waveform.

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #25 on: September 14, 2022, 12:43:07 pm »
LC transient response to DC is identical to the LR circuit.

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #26 on: September 14, 2022, 12:46:47 pm »
LC transient response to DC is identical to the LR circuit.

Its LR and RC, not LC.
Yeah the waveforms are similar, but current and voltage are inverted in the components. Capacitor lags voltage peaks current, inductor lags current peaks voltage.

YOu have an LR circuit, your cell voltage has the same waveform of a resistor voltage in series with an inductor.

You have exactly the blue curve in your first pic, the inductor current waveform, multiplied by the resistance of your resistor (water capacitor), gives you the "water capacitor" waveform.

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #27 on: September 14, 2022, 15:33:26 pm »
Not my latest but you get an idea.
Yellow: input
Blue: voltage on the cell.

The current is identical to voltage, pure electrolysis. This waveform is just the result of the current being modulated by the inductors (inductor modulator as said by Stan), multiplied by the resistance of the cell.

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #28 on: September 15, 2022, 23:29:06 pm »
A coil with zero resistance has infinite time to get maximum current for any applied voltage..

A coil with infinite resistance will have no current for any applied voltage...  such coil does not exist however when the resistance is bigger than the dielectric coeficient the coil can behave as kind of a capacitor...

Stan makes citation tay he han patent on dielectric used to cause dissociation by colision

Eccles uses plastic to kind of achieve the same...

Stan says that no electron is ejected from water during the polarization... that is only possible below 1,24 v since its the voltage that depending on the material the water start to ionize and give up electrons to the electrode... 

The concept of a pressed or stretched spring trying to oscillate... only the middle is free to oscillate


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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #29 on: December 01, 2022, 09:12:23 am »
Quote
Yeah, if you do not have enough voltage to start electrolysis, you have no current flowing

You do have current flow without electrolysis,  until the "capacitor" charges up.

You can try it with a big cell and you can observe it easily.  ;)

If it looks to you irrelevant, it is up to you, but there is more interesting things happening in the cell that some people do not talk about or is just ignoring.

Is called displacement current, it is the charge that builds up before the conduction current kicks in.

I'm really confused right now, are we trying to replicate Meyers high voltage, high frequency aparatus, or are we trying to prove some low voltage stuff that has nothing to do with meyer? If you make your cell bigger, you'll have less resistance between the plates and more current will flow for the same voltage. Thats why he moved to the high resistance injectors, he even needed stainless steel enameled wire with high resistance in order to match the transformer to the injectors. What im trying to say, is that the only way to achieve high voltage, with low current in a water bath, is to make the electrodes very small. The cells impedance will never change, even when in resonance, because above 2v, it is a resistor. You cant restrict current in a resistor, you cant violate ohms law, you cant make voltage go up and amps go down in a resistor, the only way is if you make the resistance high enough, making it small enough.

I like your way of  thinking...idk Y after reading  ur post Google decided to show me why a ceiling fan needs a capacitor lol ...anyways good luck hope to read more from ya :)

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Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #30 on: December 01, 2022, 13:55:37 pm »

Look familiar?

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    • The Legacy Of Stan Meyer
Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #31 on: December 11, 2022, 00:14:19 am »
This is my water cell. Seems to act like a capacitor to me.

Gapping the core in your chokes will also help allow those pulses to have a wider amplitude swing.