Stanley Meyer > Stan Meyers system 1

Quenching circuit the return

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sebosfato:
I believe Stanley meyer told us about the speed of the explosion of the gas also in relation to his quenching circuit. I believe you must have the tubes thin enough to pass the gas from a gas source of a determined pressure at a speed higher than that of the burning speed of the oxygen and hydrogen. This way the flame can't come back. And the fuel with its oxidizer can travel safely. You just have to know the amount of the gas to pass thru it, it's  density, the holes sizes and the pressure differential. I didn't found the calculation yet but is all about this. Even a 10-mm long Quenching circuit is enough to prevent the cell from explode if you determine your electronics to work in a manner as to maintain the pressure constant you can be 100% safe.

sebosfato:
Ok you can remember meyer cell had a pressure sensor and the circuit worked as to maintaing it aways at the max pressure even during acceleration.

outlawstc:
but stan also said that the non combustable gas would create a buffer when being introduced into the line with the fuel gas... the queching circuit involed in the fuel cell version introduces the gas outside the cylinder in the intake... there is no need to have a flame front with that just a system for delivering fuel in a safe way just incase you do have a back fire into the intake...  stan injector version he explains that the voltage being applied in the voltage zone quenches  the reaction of the release of thermal energy until after it exits the voltage field... now for the demo cell with the quenching circuit torch head on it i can see this as a reasonable approach but u see denis klien using a brazing stykle torch head and he say that hydrogen burning is one of the only gasses that dont heat of the torch and is cool to the touch right by they exit port when lit...

sebosfato:
Yes and it agree with my thought because maybe after a first quenching from the cell that isolates it and a second after the mixing with non combustible gases, after this you can use thicker quenching circuit because the speed the gas need to travel is smaller.  This explain the need for a pump for air  and other for the ambient gases that he used.

CrazyEwok:

--- Quote from: sebosfato on December 17, 2009, 18:54:47 pm ---I believe Stanley meyer told us about the speed of the explosion of the gas also in relation to his quenching circuit. I believe you must have the tubes thin enough to pass the gas from a gas source of a determined pressure at a speed higher than that of the burning speed of the oxygen and hydrogen. This way the flame can't come back. And the fuel with its oxidizer can travel safely. You just have to know the amount of the gas to pass thru it, it's  density, the holes sizes and the pressure differential. I didn't found the calculation yet but is all about this. Even a 10-mm long Quenching circuit is enough to prevent the cell from explode if you determine your electronics to work in a manner as to maintain the pressure constant you can be 100% safe.

--- End quote ---
Cell ---> Pressure regulator ----> thick tube-----> exchange(bubbler/arrestor) ---->Multiple thin tubes at higher pressure.
Same gas flow and easier to do.

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