Author Topic: Not Exactly Stan Meyer info, BUT  (Read 5171 times)

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Not Exactly Stan Meyer info, BUT
« on: February 05, 2011, 14:07:42 pm »

 Read this today, on another forum, and thought it may have some bearing on using "light" to help the Fuel cell production.

 Don't have a link, but, someone in the States can surely find the info, to see if it will help.

 
Quote
The artificial photosynthesis is what that link is about and the guy on the show is also involved from Cal-Tech. Light was used to separate the hydrogen in a glass flask. Turned the switch on (light) and the hydrogen was rising to the top in bubbles.

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Re: Not Exactly Stan Meyer info, BUT
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2011, 17:06:03 pm »
Hello,

I'm just a new member on this forum and very much interested in HHO. In fact I registered in another website but I they seem to not interested in Stan Meyer's work.

I am also interested in inventing but unfortunately have no patent granted yet. I came across Stan Meyer's invention in youtube and I think he's right on high voltage. I also looked into photolysis but the process is low voltage. My idea is between photolysis and Meyer's. It's high voltage but moderately high current.

Photolysis needs flow of electron for every molecule of water. If you apply Meyer's high voltage, it would be a lot easier for water dissociation. This is what I experienced.  I even tried magnetic resonance and combination of a lot of things.

I discovered a non-conventional reactor to lower the water's resistivity. I used deionized water with a resistivity of more than 10 Megaohms and the amperage at 30 volts is zero with no gas production. However, at 220 volts, the resistance went down to about 150 ohms and good gas production. I have not yet set it up to measure the output. When I used purified water, the resistance was 60 ohms. I want to compare my numbers with the replica of Meyer's and make sure that I'm on the right track.

I might need a partner to pursue this because I got laid off.


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Re: Not Exactly Stan Meyer info, BUT
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2011, 18:20:06 pm »
Hello,

I'm just a new member on this forum and very much interested in HHO. In fact I registered in another website but I they seem to not interested in Stan Meyer's work.

I am also interested in inventing but unfortunately have no patent granted yet. I came across Stan Meyer's invention in youtube and I think he's right on high voltage. I also looked into photolysis but the process is low voltage. My idea is between photolysis and Meyer's. It's high voltage but moderately high current.

Photolysis needs flow of electron for every molecule of water. If you apply Meyer's high voltage, it would be a lot easier for water dissociation. This is what I experienced.  I even tried magnetic resonance and combination of a lot of things.

I discovered a non-conventional reactor to lower the water's resistivity. I used deionized water with a resistivity of more than 10 Megaohms and the amperage at 30 volts is zero with no gas production. However, at 220 volts, the resistance went down to about 150 ohms and good gas production. I have not yet set it up to measure the output. When I used purified water, the resistance was 60 ohms. I want to compare my numbers with the replica of Meyer's and make sure that I'm on the right track.

I might need a partner to pursue this because I got laid off.

Welcome to this forum!
Interesting tests you did.
At the end, ill gues, you had basic electrolysis, i think.
Production would have been the same with 2v and the same amps.
Stan talks about KV's.... Thats hard to do.
But its good to have another builder here on the forum!

Steve




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Re: Not Exactly Stan Meyer info, BUT
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2011, 18:54:45 pm »


Welcome to this forum!
Interesting tests you did.
At the end, ill gues, you had basic electrolysis, i think.
Production would have been the same with 2v and the same amps.
Stan talks about KV's.... Thats hard to do.
But its good to have another builder here on the forum!

Steve

 Thanks Steve.
 
 I tried lower volts at the same amps but that would mean adding electrolytes. My goal is not to use electrolytes and I guess It could really be done but at higher voltage. Of course, the temperature would rise and consequently the amperage and thus further lowering the resistance. HHO is feasible I think using a batch process or a continuous process with temperature or current control.
 
 I also used million volts but in the end, I need to have current.  My reactor seems to have a preferential polarity for good gas production. I'm not sure if VIC will work on this reactor.
 
 

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Re: Not Exactly Stan Meyer info, BUT
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2011, 21:26:40 pm »
Another thing I found out based on my experience is that flat plates are inefficient.  Stan Meyer must have found it out also.
 
 The practical metal for electrolysis as of this time is stainless steel. Copper and aluminum corrodes faster but they're good when a magnetic field is used.
 
 A high voltage seems to accelerate dissociation of water.
 

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Re: Not Exactly Stan Meyer info, BUT
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2011, 14:51:50 pm »
Anybody want to contribute their ideas, experiences, findings, data,.....?

If no one wants to, this would be another forum that I have to skip.

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Re: Not Exactly Stan Meyer info, BUT
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2011, 02:28:46 am »
high voltage accelerates electroysis because with more volts your force in more amps.
If you want to see peoples finding look under their project sections.

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Re: Not Exactly Stan Meyer info, BUT
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2011, 02:47:27 am »
high voltage accelerates electroysis because with more volts your force in more amps.
If you want to see peoples finding look under their project sections.

Thanks Dave.

I observed my reactor by applying different voltages and amperages. At a fixed amperage and different voltages, the one with the higher voltage has more aggressive gas production. I don't think it's just about forcing the amps. Just my opinion. Water's dielectric breakdown is about voltage not amps.

I looked at the different projects and have found some interesting ones but most of them are about Meyer's work. I only agree on Meyer's high voltage and VIC which is similar to MOT with current limiter.