Author Topic: How the VIC Works - IMPORTANT!  (Read 39832 times)

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How the VIC Works - IMPORTANT!
« on: February 23, 2015, 05:30:39 am »
In a step up transformer, the power in equals the power out.  However, the power is transformed in that the increased resistance in the longer coil of the secondary induces a higher voltage.  This is because of the ratio of the resistance from the primary to the secondary coils.

Let's say we step up the voltage at a ratio of 1:5.  If we input voltage into the primary at 12 volts and step it up, we get an output of 60 volts.  Let's say our primary has a resistance of 10 ohms. That means the current on the primary will be 1.2A and transformed onto the secondary the current will be 1.2/5 =0.24A if our secondary has a resistance 5 times higher than the primary.  And this will be the driving current of our secondary circuit.

Now, if we look at the L1 and L2 coils of the VIC.  Once the primary of the VIC has received an on pulse it will initiate a current in the secondary of 0.24A.  The VIC is made of inductors.   Inductors by nature oppose changes to the flow of current.  So, once the off pulse comes, the L1 and L2 coils are going to oppose any change in their current flow.  Here is where the magic happens.  If we assume that the L1 and L2 have an inductive reactance of 60,000 ohms at resonance then L1 and L2 will have to induce a voltage of 60,000 ohm x 0.24A (V=IR) which is 14,400 V to keep the current flowing on the off pulse.

This whole system works as a DC resonant charging circuit as is shown here:
http://www.richieburnett.co.uk/dcreschg.html

TS

This topic is somewhat of an accumulation of research.  Much of it is related to and referenced in many of my past topics in my project section.  Some of it is a clarified understanding of past posts.  Throughout this topic I make regular references to the sources of my information that I have either recently discovered or previously discovered over the last 7 years.  There is also references to others research and findings contained in the attached links.  I do not wish to claim sole credit for this knowledge nor do I claim it to be complete or without error.  However, I believe I have come to recognize the operation of the VIC circuit as a whole and am explaining what I have come to understand.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2016, 15:34:08 pm by timeshell »

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2015, 10:47:37 am »
Hi TS,

All the 3 coils , 2 chokes and secondairy, are getting the first change when the primary gets charged.
By the off state of the primary, all three will discharge thru the totall resistance of the closed circuit.

I think it is a bit different then the dc resonance charging system of mr Burnett....

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2015, 12:10:58 pm »
Hi TS,

All the 3 coils , 2 chokes and secondairy, are getting the first change when the primary gets charged.
By the off state of the primary, all three will discharge thru the totall resistance of the closed circuit.

I think it is a bit different then the dc resonance charging system of mr Burnett....

Only if they are all on the same core.


I believe there are flaws in their interpretation, but they explain a new approach suggesting Meyers cores were at least in some way separate.  This also includes some direction and inspiration I received from R.Walker. 

TS
« Last Edit: March 14, 2015, 14:38:29 pm by timeshell »

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2015, 07:03:23 am »
I believe there are some fundamental flaws in Russ video in the flow of the VIC.  I am working on the premise that this coil arrangement is correct.  However, here is how I believe that it is functioning.

First off, let's look at the initial pulse on the primary core.  It will create a field on the core creating a potential difference across the L2 coil.   Now the one thing that they are not seeing is that this also creates a voltage potential across the L1 and secondary coils (which are in series) also at the same time since they are in parallel with L1.  This means that the voltage created on L2  will develop a field on the secondary core (which have L1 and the secondary connected in series) at the same time as L2 purely because of the voltage potential developing across L2.

Now, because L1 and the secondary are connected in such a way so that their current will oppose each other, the net effect will be that they cancel each other out, preventing current flow and leaving that side of the water cell with a nearly static electrical state.

However, L2 is not static.  It continues to receive a pulse from the primary and induces current opposing the static state on the opposite side of the cell creating the pulse stretching effect on the building charge of the cell; essentially, the unipolar pulse.  This is where the L2 must be variable to tune into the resonant properties occurring at the static side of the cell. Once they match, you will have a proper unipolar pulse across the cell.

When tuning the frequency, the resonant pulse will have a tuning range at resonance. I believe that it will need to be tuned in such a way while monitoring the wave form of the feedback coil so that peaks are reduced only until pulses and gate time reduce to form the side by side pulses indicated in Meyers "inductive coupling diagram".  I have done this and created this coupling effect.

EDIT:
Also, as I indicate in my past KB post TSKB00006 at http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php/topic,2409.msg22744.html#msg22744, L2, being variable, may need to be exactly tuned to the corresponding inductance value for its side of the water cell, whose capacitance is different from the opposite side due to the difference in plate area so that matching resonance occurs on both sides of the cell.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2015, 15:41:00 pm by timeshell »

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2015, 10:46:02 am »
According to Meyer him self the system must mess around with the potential of the cell and that frequency would double because of the action of the coils...

---Timeshell:  This occurs at resonance.

My idea of it is that this action arise because of the asymmetrical configuration of the cell.   

Since inside a charged sphere the electric field is zero but potential is not when the positive pulse come to the outer cylinder it raises its potential and as there is a series of cells connected there is indeed an electric field.
Meyer says that electrons are extracted from the cell such that it never comes below an arbitrary ground voltage reference.

  The pulsing can be only in a few ways...

Or the diode is conducting during pulse on or off

or if the coils should add or subtract (on the second core)

so basically 4 setups to tests.

« Last Edit: April 21, 2015, 15:42:17 pm by timeshell »

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2015, 13:54:30 pm »
According to Meyer him self the system must mess around with the potential of the cell and that frequency would double because of the action of the coils...

The frequency and voltage doubling is simply the action of the DC resonant charging circuit which is L1 with the cell.  L2 balances it to keep the charge in the cell.   Refer to the link in the first post. The VIC very closely resembles that circuit.

It's still an interesting variation of a DC resonant charging circuit.

EDIT:
Actually, the functions of L1 and L2 may be reversed of what is stated above.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2015, 10:53:17 am by timeshell »

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2015, 17:38:57 pm »
What i meant is that in asymmetrical capacitors there is a voltage that appears on the other electrode if you simply charge one electrode..   

The electric field locally will be equivalent to the potential achieved.. . 

If you charge the inner electrode there is automatically a potential difference set up between the electrodes... the charges wants to go to the outer electrode if you would short them...

on the opposite situation the charge remains in the outer electrode, and brings the potential of whats inside with it...... so if you charge the inner electrode negatively than send a positive pulse to the outer electrode during pulse off it would generate a doubling frequency.. .using potential only as a force within the circuit...

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Re: How the VIC Works - Induced DC Current Voltage
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2015, 18:12:11 pm »
In this context, I'm not even sure that is relevant.  In short, we are creating and pulsing a potential difference across an open circuit.  This is really what matters.

I think too much focus is being put on the capacitor now. While knowing the capacitance value is important to set the frequency, understanding how the rest of the VIC works is more important and will make you realize what the capacitor is doing.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2015, 19:57:58 pm by timeshell »