Author Topic: Incrementation Basic..  (Read 5162 times)

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Incrementation Basic..
« on: September 24, 2010, 07:38:17 am »
ZiArc 9-10

At Sea level pressure"s" Liquid water can only exist at 212°F, Any added heat above 212°F contributes to Liquid to vapor conversion. The rate at which the liquid converts to vapor is dependent upon quantity of heat added after the 212°F mark. The steam created remains at 212°F and doesn't increase in temperature.

The amount of heat/energy required to convert liquid water into steam at 212°F is great. The heat energy absorbed by the water to make the conversion does not increase the water or steams temperature, It is heat that was introduced to the properties, But appears to go nowhere since it doesn't increase the water or steams temperature, it is LATENT.

If you add heat to steam, it can rise above 212°F. The temperature of the steam subtracted from its liquid boiling point reveals its superheat value.

Water in a pressurized vessel will not boil at its normal boiling temperature. Due to being under pressure the waters boiling point Raises. The more pressure you put on the water, The higher its Boiling point. ("If water starts to boil you can Stop the boiling by just adding pressure.) Water can remain in the liquid state at raised boiling points.

If the boiling point of water was raised to 225°F by adding pressure, it would have a superheat of 13°F. Rapidly Bringing the water down to its (Normal) sea level pressure would cause the water to rapidly Boil into steam, (Violently.)

PROPANE EXPANDS -- Propane liquid will expand 270 times as it changes from a liquid state to vapor state. For example, 1 gallon of liquid stored under pressure in a container will expand to approximately 270 gallons of vapor if released to the atmosphere. Consequently, a small amount of liquid propane has the potential to create a serious hazard. This rapid expansion ratio of 270:1 makes propane an effective refrigerant. Enough said for now..

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Re: Incrementation Basic..
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2010, 09:09:19 am »
wow very very insightful....

so now i am trying to fully relate it.. are you saying that higher and higher voltage can be applied and as it builds pressure and it will restrict amps better to take on higher charge... then pulsing it will create repetitious burst of production due to the adding a physical bounce to the cell (pressure being gated = physical expanding and collapsing bounce)???? it makes sense to resonate its expansion  i guess.. please go further

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Re: Incrementation Basic..
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2010, 19:55:45 pm »
So i guess we can say there is 2 different potentials being applied to the water to create the effects of stans design..  One is of electrical pressure the other is of a density pressure (the pressure being caused by the contained expanding gasses)

Water under a vacuum will boil without heat.. When working on and repairing ac units.. before refilling with freon they must hook the system up to a vacuum. This is done to remove whatever moister remains in the system from being exposed to a outside environment...  So we can say that it is possible to vaporize water into a cold steam by applying a vacuum (a adverse change from sea level atmospheric pressure) concluding that waters exterior status (pressure or vacuum) can and will influence waters ability to  remain in a liquid density or to expand in a vapor density..when usually other effects such as heat and possibly voltage would cause a expansion they do not... as Warp said above when you bring water back down to sea level pressure, after being raised in pressure and heated to above normal boiling temps it is possible to release a higher energy content of steam. Not only that but as pressure continues to fall it will become more violent (more productive in release)
« Last Edit: September 24, 2010, 23:26:38 pm by outlawstc »

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Re: Incrementation Basic..
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2010, 02:24:13 am »
Now I'm thinking about Stans fuel injectors. They allowed a compression state to develop in the liquid to gas stage as its being forced out of a narrowing outlet during expansion from applied voltage... on its way out the the injector it will experience a a state higher pressure due to it expanding from applied voltage and will enter a state of another status...  maybe this allows more energy to be taken on exactly how brains saying you can do with boiling water..   as it exits the injector nozzle it is the state of going from more pressure falling rapidly back to what ever the state of the cylinder is.. You would think since Stan was restricting air intake this would intensify the expanding effect of the fuel gas since the intake stoke of the motor will create more of a vacuum potential in the cylinder .. somthing else stan was doing.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2010, 08:57:39 am by outlawstc »

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Re: Incrementation Basic..
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2010, 21:15:58 pm »
 :)
« Last Edit: September 26, 2010, 17:07:27 pm by Warp »

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Re: Incrementation Basic..
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2010, 03:43:34 am »
Now i am thinking of the other things that relate in to the topic.. We know amps go up with heat and they must fall with cold.. The maximum density  of water occurs at 3.98 °C (39.16 °F).  this is info from wiki.. now with the new knowledge can we say this dense  point varies with pressure as well?

 

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Re: Incrementation Basic..
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2010, 06:28:43 am »

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