Author Topic: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit  (Read 11891 times)

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Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
« on: June 14, 2008, 22:06:00 pm »
 ;D MY New Bob Boyce Circuit  ;D

It's a challenge for me, Especially the 9 micro caps on the back. But it's been educational as well. I've improve my soldering ability.  And, I am getting a better knowledge of how things work.

At this point. I've got the circuit about built  (minus 1 cap) on the first frequency. I ordered everything for the coil, should be next week.

Here are some pics, and a video


Spike

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Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2008, 01:06:33 am »
Nice Spike!
I like to read about your results soon! ;)

br
Steve

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Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2008, 01:42:18 am »
Nice looking board!  Where is the doughnut?      ;)

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Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2008, 02:41:40 am »
Spike,
Looks like your doing good work. Those tiny little capacitors next to the quarter are SMT Capacitors. SMT stands for Surface Mount Technology for those that don't know. In most cases where I can when I do SMT work I place those components on the board first because they are really hard to mount using a soldering iron. You have to be very careful or you will crack the component with too much heat. It's a good idea to inspect each one using a jewelers loop to see if any cracks are evident.  This could prevent a problem with the board later on when you're all set to try it out.

If anyone is interested I can post a great way to do these SMT components with little or no problems.


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Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2008, 03:03:06 am »
Dr Not

Always looking for a better way to do things. How I installed them was with a weller battery powered gun. I would set one dab of solder, Then place the cap near by. Heat the solder back up, And as soon as it would liquefy. I moved the cap into the solders edge. when I could see it bound, I removed the heat. Leaving my knife blade on the cap for a few seconds longer to absorb heat. Then remove the blade. I looked at them with a regular magnifier and checked with a meter after i was done.  But time will tell

Spike

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Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2008, 04:12:57 am »
Spike,

First off the SMT line of solder guns are nothing but small heat blowers that are extremely overpriced. . Understanding that you can by a plastic welder from Harbor Freight, and a small aquarium pump and make your own SMT Solder Gun. I used the 30 dollar model and used a piece of copper tube to reduce the size that blows the heat out. It is very easy to use when you have only a few parts to put on a board or if you ever have to replace any SMT components.

Ok, if you have a lot of SMT components to place on a board you can put them on and the paste solder will hold them in place as you work the heat around. If you want to work a board full of SMT Components this might be better. You will need a small toaster oven, but a big oven will work if you don't have the smaller one. First you place the paste and components in place, then carefully, very carefully place the board in the toaster oven. Recheck to see if all the components are in place, and if they are close the door and turn the oven up to around 400 degrees. You really need to check what degree mark you will need to turn the oven up to in order to melt the solder paste before you do this on an actual board, but do use a junk board while checking as other material may give you false indications. Once you know what to expect you can do it for real. When doing it for real watch the board through the window and when you see all the joints are shinny give it about 3 more minutes, then carefully cut the power off and open the door. Make certain that you do not jar it around or the parts will move. Believe me they move a lot easier than you would think. Let it cool down while you have a cup of coffee or a coke.

If you go out to buy a toaster oven try to get one that has overhead heating wires or elements. They work the best because the heat is forced down onto the PC Board.

Anyway that is my 2 cents worth and I hope it helps you out. You or anyone else.

bigjgarr

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Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2008, 04:20:18 am »
Spike,
One last note. The way you describe that you soldered the components it sounds like you limited the heat and it should be ok when you fire it up. I sure hope so because trouble shooting a circuit is a pain. I plan on buying one of these myself real soon here because I want the multi-frequency oscillation too, and right now I just dug through my parts box and found everything to build the Lawton circuit. I'll put that one together first.

BTW which board did you buy? I am assuming that you got it from hydrogen garage. If not where did you get it?

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Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2008, 04:23:39 am »
Dr Not

First I got the G3 board from hydrogen garage.

Second, So would it be best, to attach these first, before installing anything else. And could you show a picture of your plastic welder setup?

Thanks
Spike