Author Topic: AMA analysis of Cramton and Replication  (Read 18852 times)

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Re: AMA analysis of Cramton and Replication
« Reply #24 on: November 13, 2011, 02:57:43 am »
What does the IR do to the HHO? Why not test the idea of increasing the energy output of the HHO with the IR and a secondary set of dry voltage zones? If you increase the energy yield of the HHO, then there is no need for an increase in gas production by a more efficient method of electrolysis or otherwise.

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Re: AMA analysis of Cramton and Replication
« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2011, 16:35:09 pm »
Hello Ste,

Did you tried varying the lamp voltage? From what i understood it would emit a different specific wave length for a given different temperature... hotter shorter...

sebs

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Re: AMA analysis of Cramton and Replication
« Reply #26 on: November 14, 2011, 10:33:28 am »
Hello Ste,

Did you tried varying the lamp voltage? From what i understood it would emit a different specific wave length for a given different temperature... hotter shorter...

sebs

No, i havent tried that.
When i am back home, i will try it.

Steve

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Re: AMA analysis of Cramton and Replication
« Reply #27 on: November 16, 2011, 19:42:40 pm »
Wave length should be 2-14 um, also your cell should be insulated from ambient light. The photons emitted from the lamp must be contained within the cell only. Just as with Dr. Wey's paper, the photons will not penetrate any metal structure, rubber is the best material we have found to date, this does take time for the rubber to become saturated to sustain larger effects on gas production

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Re: AMA analysis of Cramton and Replication
« Reply #28 on: November 16, 2011, 20:22:52 pm »
Test lamps

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Re: AMA analysis of Cramton and Replication
« Reply #29 on: July 22, 2012, 18:56:56 pm »
For those of you that would like to continue this work.
1. Identify the wave length of absorption of liquid water
2. Calculate the Rife sub harmonic of the above frequency
3. Apply that sub harmonic frequency with your PWM

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Re: AMA analysis of Cramton and Replication
« Reply #30 on: July 22, 2012, 22:19:26 pm »
For those of you that would like to continue this work.
1. Identify the wave length of absorption of liquid water
2. Calculate the Rife sub harmonic of the above frequency
3. Apply that sub harmonic frequency with your PWM

Hi Scott,

I am still interested in this work  :)
Ill try to follow you and will write here what you try to tell.
Please correct me if i am wrong.

1. Water owes its intrinsic blueness to selective absorption in the red part of its visible spectrum. The absorbed photons promote transitions to high overtone and combination states of the nuclear motions of the molecule, i.e. to highly excited vibrations. To our knowledge the intrinsic blueness of water is the only example from nature in which color originates from vibrational transitions.
Frequency range between 600nm till 800nm. Probably 698nm.
2. 214751044,42 herz (214,8mhz) is the rife sub harmonic for 698nm...according to this website and attached files..
http://www.rifetechnologies.com/calcul.html
3. What should now happen if i apply this to a PWM? Can you please be more specific?
Appreciated!

Steve




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Re: AMA analysis of Cramton and Replication
« Reply #31 on: July 24, 2012, 17:08:16 pm »
Steve

You are correct that the absorption of liquid water with photons of the correct wave length or combination thereof and energy level will promote transitions of the nuclear motions of the molecule. A colleague in Europe just attempted a replication of our experiment using a 2-8um bulb, but as you found saw very little difference in gas production. The bulb that we are using is 2-14um, so there may in fact be a difference.  Try the frequency's in the attached document with the Rife "Light" calculator