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Projects by members => Projects by members => Spike => Topic started by: Spike on June 14, 2008, 22:06:00 pm

Title: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 14, 2008, 22:06:00 pm
 ;D MY New Bob Boyce Circuit  ;D

It's a challenge for me, Especially the 9 micro caps on the back. But it's been educational as well. I've improve my soldering ability.  And, I am getting a better knowledge of how things work.

At this point. I've got the circuit about built  (minus 1 cap) on the first frequency. I ordered everything for the coil, should be next week.

Here are some pics, and a video


Spike
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 15, 2008, 01:06:33 am
Nice Spike!
I like to read about your results soon! ;)

br
Steve
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 16, 2008, 01:42:18 am
Nice looking board!  Where is the doughnut?      ;)
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 16, 2008, 02:41:40 am
Spike,
Looks like your doing good work. Those tiny little capacitors next to the quarter are SMT Capacitors. SMT stands for Surface Mount Technology for those that don't know. In most cases where I can when I do SMT work I place those components on the board first because they are really hard to mount using a soldering iron. You have to be very careful or you will crack the component with too much heat. It's a good idea to inspect each one using a jewelers loop to see if any cracks are evident.  This could prevent a problem with the board later on when you're all set to try it out.

If anyone is interested I can post a great way to do these SMT components with little or no problems.

Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 16, 2008, 03:03:06 am
Dr Not

Always looking for a better way to do things. How I installed them was with a weller battery powered gun. I would set one dab of solder, Then place the cap near by. Heat the solder back up, And as soon as it would liquefy. I moved the cap into the solders edge. when I could see it bound, I removed the heat. Leaving my knife blade on the cap for a few seconds longer to absorb heat. Then remove the blade. I looked at them with a regular magnifier and checked with a meter after i was done.  But time will tell

Spike
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 16, 2008, 04:12:57 am
Spike,

First off the SMT line of solder guns are nothing but small heat blowers that are extremely overpriced. . Understanding that you can by a plastic welder from Harbor Freight, and a small aquarium pump and make your own SMT Solder Gun. I used the 30 dollar model and used a piece of copper tube to reduce the size that blows the heat out. It is very easy to use when you have only a few parts to put on a board or if you ever have to replace any SMT components.

Ok, if you have a lot of SMT components to place on a board you can put them on and the paste solder will hold them in place as you work the heat around. If you want to work a board full of SMT Components this might be better. You will need a small toaster oven, but a big oven will work if you don't have the smaller one. First you place the paste and components in place, then carefully, very carefully place the board in the toaster oven. Recheck to see if all the components are in place, and if they are close the door and turn the oven up to around 400 degrees. You really need to check what degree mark you will need to turn the oven up to in order to melt the solder paste before you do this on an actual board, but do use a junk board while checking as other material may give you false indications. Once you know what to expect you can do it for real. When doing it for real watch the board through the window and when you see all the joints are shinny give it about 3 more minutes, then carefully cut the power off and open the door. Make certain that you do not jar it around or the parts will move. Believe me they move a lot easier than you would think. Let it cool down while you have a cup of coffee or a coke.

If you go out to buy a toaster oven try to get one that has overhead heating wires or elements. They work the best because the heat is forced down onto the PC Board.

Anyway that is my 2 cents worth and I hope it helps you out. You or anyone else.
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 16, 2008, 04:20:18 am
Spike,
One last note. The way you describe that you soldered the components it sounds like you limited the heat and it should be ok when you fire it up. I sure hope so because trouble shooting a circuit is a pain. I plan on buying one of these myself real soon here because I want the multi-frequency oscillation too, and right now I just dug through my parts box and found everything to build the Lawton circuit. I'll put that one together first.

BTW which board did you buy? I am assuming that you got it from hydrogen garage. If not where did you get it?
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 16, 2008, 04:23:39 am
Dr Not

First I got the G3 board from hydrogen garage.

Second, So would it be best, to attach these first, before installing anything else. And could you show a picture of your plastic welder setup?

Thanks
Spike
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 16, 2008, 06:37:26 am
I don't have my digital camera at the moment but I think this will do. Here is the exact plastic welder I bought. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=41592 I bought a double bubbler aquarium pump at Walmart - The I picked up the plastic tube for the pump and a Y connector for the tube. Then I placed both bubbler lines from the pump on the Y so I had a single hose going to the end of the welder hose. I secured it all together with black electrical tape and shrink wrap over that. The heater is built in the welder so you need to plug in both the welder and the aquarium pump. The heater is adjustable right on the welder too. The handle you hold is large, about 1 1/2" in diameter. If anything is bad about it it would be that it would be nice if smaller. The outlet for hot ait is about 1/4" diameter and in most cases this is just fine. I have made a smaller tube that fits inside very snugly in order to concentrate the heat more for when I am removing a component from a board. This way I try not to get a bunch of components loose to cause me more work. Always use a tweezers to remove components and I find using them is easier to place components as well.

When you have SMT components mixed in with through the board components I always mount the SMT ones first. They are hardest and I like to get them out of the way first. As for other components I always resistors first, then caps, then transistors, then ICs. But sometimes in a tight area you may have to alter this.

As far as a regular soldering iron I always use a temperature regulated model with an isolated tip.  That way you don't chance a millivolt blowing your IC or transistor.  They cost more but I do a lot of work that requires it. For the once in a while guy you can use a battery or cordless soldering iron or just connect a separate ground wire on your soldering tip to keep it grounded.

The main thing to keep in mind though is that heat from soldering irons is usually around 700 degrees and this will burn a component quickly. So try to keep your iron on solder joint time under 2 seconds and everything will be fine.

Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 16, 2008, 06:43:27 am
Spike,
If you buy the welder and set it up to use in electronics just make sure you don't let it sit still on a single place if you are down close to the board. You don't have to move it a lot but move it some so the area doesn't overheat. I work the tip about 4 to 6 inches away from the board.
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 17, 2008, 04:45:11 am
Found it Spike.

Thanks Dr Not!

Flag  8)
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 17, 2008, 05:24:31 am
Yes, I found it. and the way  technology is going, We are bound to see more of these SMT circuits.

Spike
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 17, 2008, 05:30:34 am
I have seen some that are even smaller believe it or not - They are a royal pain in the you know what.....
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 17, 2008, 05:35:27 am
Talk about micro min soldering, You probable look something like a diamond cutter at your soldering station, With the big magnifying light.

Spike
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 17, 2008, 05:49:30 am
You're right! Some components that I have has to work with are so small that you can pick them up with a pointed tweezers and you're not sure you even have it untill you see it under magnification. Even with SMT equipment these are almost impossible. I don't think they are really designed for people to fix at all. Micro-mini circuits provide us with small gadgets that are really cool, but if they break you often have to buy another one......... Think they plan it that way? Just like the planned obsolescence of almost every item now on the market. Food for thought!
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 20, 2008, 03:51:28 am
 ;D COIL PARTS !!!!  ;D

Just an update, My circuit is done. Just need checked one more time. But It's time to make the dough nuts. The coil is a job all its own. It's a behemoth,  :o  Huge, 10lbs or iron powder, then add wire and tape. I'm hoping that it packs just as big of a punch.  ;D  But here is a picture of the coil, And a video link.


Spike
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 21, 2008, 03:28:35 am
Coil update

Secondary wire is complete. Here are some pictures

Spike
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 21, 2008, 06:23:02 am
Your windings look great. Hey I viewed your video and I have to ask - where in the world did you find that heat sink? I could make a dozen heat sinks from that one LOL. Where did you buy the Toroid from?
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 21, 2008, 07:21:02 am
Dr Not

The toriod core came from http://www.micrometals.com/
The heat sink, the wire, tape,and bridge rectifier, came from http://www.apexjr.com

 ;D My toriod core is done  ;D

Here are some pictures

Spike
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 21, 2008, 10:23:30 am
Well,,,, i might not have been looking,,, but i have not ever seen anyone Replicate the bob cell like spike is doing,,, he is doing such a great job!

Keep up the good work man,, you make this hobby look great!
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 22, 2008, 00:06:22 am
Go Spike go!

Its looking great Spike!

br
Steve
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 22, 2008, 00:09:17 am

 That thing is a work of art. Nice job.
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on June 22, 2008, 02:04:17 am
I've been playing with a new video program to make slide shows, Combine videos, ect
Check it out  ;D

Spike

Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 15, 2008, 05:20:55 am
I've been working on my Bob Boyce circuit
This part deals with the case for the coil, inverter, and electronics

Spike
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 15, 2008, 10:59:52 am
Your inverter has its own frequencies isn't the fields from the coil gona effect it, cant you isolate your torroid Bro?
Put ur toroid in aluminum and then beside your invert ;)
Title: Re: Spike's Bob Boyce Circuit
Post by: Login to see usernames on July 15, 2008, 23:17:26 pm
student_engineer

Thanks for the tip,  I'll try it both ways,
And let you know if there is any noticeable difference. 

Spike