Author Topic: My Thoughts on how Meyer split water  (Read 60472 times)

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Re: My Thoughts on how Meyer split water
« Reply #80 on: July 28, 2011, 04:14:16 am »
I have a VIC circuit that I'm selling at a discounted price due an imperfection on the board. I screwed up and installed a regulator backwards and while I was removing the regulator I pulled one of the traces up, but it didn't break of anything. I super glued it back down to the board and can't sale it as new, so rather than throwing it away I figured I would just sell it at a discounted price of $200 shipped. I have tested it and it works fine, just the small imperfection. If interested send me an email to tonywoodside@gmail.com  Here are some images of the section of the board.
(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/discounted-1.JPG)

(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/discounted-2.JPG)

(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/discounted-3.JPG)

(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/discounted-4.JPG)

(http://www.globalkast.com/images/tonywoodside/discounted-5.JPG)


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Re: My Thoughts on how Meyer split water
« Reply #81 on: July 28, 2011, 08:39:19 am »
 
I`m guessing that he wired the 10 small cells in series so to have the most surface area possible with the lowest capacitance value.
 



Why did SM build all the 11 VIC coils and circuits if he used 1 VIC and circuit and 10 wfc cells in series?


That`s a million dollar question Webmug!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Re: My Thoughts on how Meyer split water
« Reply #82 on: July 28, 2011, 08:47:14 am »
The best answer I can give you for this is that Stan originally had issues with the capacitance for each tube as the water temp changed from the weather. So in the end he connected all the tubes in series in order to 1) Lower the capacitance value. 2) By them being in series it would keep an almost constant capacitance value if the temp changed. The deviation of changing capacitance would be that great due to the 1/10 tube value change.

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Re: My Thoughts on how Meyer split water
« Reply #83 on: July 28, 2011, 09:18:53 am »
Hey Tony,
Do you think that it is still possible to tune into the molecule and split water with only one tube set ? or does we need a lower capacitance cell combination and different frequencies ?
 
HM

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Re: My Thoughts on how Meyer split water
« Reply #84 on: July 28, 2011, 17:22:12 pm »
yea I think we need the low capacitance in order to get this to work so that we get the right frequencies.

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Re: My Thoughts on how Meyer split water
« Reply #85 on: July 29, 2011, 16:39:43 pm »
here is a video I made that explains the process. Please read the video description. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rP7k6sG1NXQ

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Re: My Thoughts on how Meyer split water
« Reply #86 on: July 29, 2011, 18:37:54 pm »
Series Connected Capacitors.


This changed the game play a bit, so lets look at what it really changes. The charging current (ic) flowing through the capacitors is THE SAME for all capacitors as it only has one path to follow and iT = i1 = i2 = i3 etc. Then, Capacitors in Series all have the same current so each capacitor stores the same amount of charge regardless of its capacitance. This is because the charge stored by an electrode of any one capacitor must have come from the electrode of its adjacent capacitor, therefor
Quote
QT = Q1 = Q2 = Q3 .... ETC
In the following circuit, capacitors, C1, C2 and C3 are all connected together in a series branch between point A and B
Between point A and B, we have;


C1 = 0.1uF (VC1)
C2 = 0.2uF (VC2)
C3 = 0.3uF (VC3)
VAB = 12V (the over all voltage charge)


In a parallel circuit, what we thought Meyer had, the total capacitance, CT of the circuit was equal to the sum of all the individual capacitors added together. In a series connected circuit however, the total or equal capacitance CT is calculated differently. The voltage drop across each capacitor will be different depending upon the values of the individual capacitance - )we should see or measure the same if all the individual cells are made in the same manor) -  Then by adding Kirchoff's Voltage Law (KVL) to the above circuit, we get;
Quote
VAB = VC1 + VC2 + VC3 = 12V
Kirchoff's Voltage Law (KVL)
This law is also called Kirchoff's second law, Kirchoff's loop (mesh) rule. The principle of conservation of energy implies that; The direct sum of the electrical potential differences (voltage) around any closed circuit is zero OR More simply, the sum of the emfs in any closed loop is equivalent to the sum of the potential drop in that loop OR The algebraic sum of the products of the resistance of the conductors and the currents in them in a closed loop is equal to the total emf available in that loop. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirchhoff%27s_circuit_laws#Kirchhoff.27s_voltage_law_.28KVL.29
Quote
VAB = VC1 + VC2 + VC3 = 12V
VC1 = QT /C1 - VC2 = QT / C2 - VC3 = QT / C3

Since Q = CV or V = Q/C, substituting Q/C for each capacitors voltage VC in the above KVL equation gives us:
Quote
VAB = QT/CT = QT/C1 + QT/C2 + QT/C3

Dividing each term through by Q gives:
Quote

Series Capacitance Equation
CT = (1/C1) + (1/C2) + (1/C3) + ... etc

When adding together capacitors in series, the reciprocal (1/C) of the individual capacitors are all added together (just like resistors in parallel) instead of the capacitance's themselves. Then the total value for the capacitors in series equals the reciprocal of the sum of the reciprocal of the individual capacitance's.


Example;
Using Tony's number of 67nF over a single capacitor for a 10 capacitor cell:


1/CT =(1/67) = 0.014925 x 10 = 1/0,14925 = 6,7nF


So we now all of a sudden only have 1/10'th of the initial capacitance. One important point to remember about capacitors connected in series is that the total capacitance (CT) of any number of capacitors connected together in series will ALWAYS BE LESS then the value of the smallest capacitor in the series and in our case CT = 6,7nF where's one capacitor is 67nF

Adding cell's will of course lower the capacitance. If we had 20 capacitors, the number will only be 3,35nF

You can check the capacitance value for your cell's here: http://www.csgnetwork.com/seriescapacicalc.html

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Re: My Thoughts on how Meyer split water
« Reply #87 on: July 29, 2011, 22:40:03 pm »
here is a video I made that explains the process. Please read the video description. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rP7k6sG1NXQ
Thanks for sharing this video of the effect, Tony!!!  :)

I have it also running in my simulator now. The voltage is growing fast peak to peak from L1 at resonance.
How high is this voltage generated in the real L1 inductor, you said you generated about 4kV? That's enough I think.
Keep it below the max. range of the wire specs I assume.

Have you measured the frequency from your pickup coil on your scope? I was wondering how it looks like?

Great!

Br,
Webmug