Author Topic: Electrode comparison  (Read 2661 times)

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Re: Electrode comparison
« Reply #16 on: November 27, 2018, 00:18:25 am »
i was wandering if the concentric tubes were correlated to the water geometry;;; 


i would propose an experiment you could try to charge first the big electrode than connect the thinner and see were the bubbles go after the connection... if i´m right somehow the smaller electrode is charging up before the big for some reason.


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Thomson effect
« Reply #17 on: November 27, 2018, 00:58:42 am »
2. Thomson effect. In a wire in which the temperature varies from point to point (as for example in one whose ends are maintained at different temperatures), the free electron density varies from point to point with the temperature (the free electron density is highest at points where the temperature is lowest). As a consequence of this, differences of potential may be observed along the wire corresponding to the varying free electron density. Each infinitesimal element of a wire of nonuniform temperature is thus a seat of emf, a discovery made by Sir William Thomson (Lord Kelvin). When a current is maintained in a wire of nonuniform temperature, heat is liberated or absorbed at all points of the wire. This heat, called Thomson heat, is proportional to the quantity of electricity passing the section of wire and to the temperature difference between the ends of the section.

 

Def. Thomson emf, σAdt. If an infinitesimal length of wire A has a temperature difference dt (i.e. dt is temperature difference between the beginning and end of the section), the number of joules of heat absorbed or liberated in this length of wire per coulomb of electricity transferred is called the Thomson emf, σAdt

 
The total Thomson emf in a wire whose ends are at temperatures t1 and t2 is

The coefficient σA is sometimes called the “specific heat of electricity”.

http://www.solitaryroad.com/c1045.html

https://www.chemguide.co.uk/physical/redoxeqia/introduction.html

2. Polarization. As a voltaic cell operates, the positive electrode tends to become coated with an accumulation of tiny bubbles of hydrogen gas. Thus an electrode of hydrogen has been effectively substituted for the carbon electrode we started with. The result is a gradual drop in voltage as the cell operates. The phenomenon is called polarization. To overcome this defect, manufacturers add a depolarizer such as potassium dichromate to the cell. The depolarizer unites chemically with the hydrogen and removes it from the carbon.

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Re: Electrode comparison
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2018, 09:53:37 am »
i was wandering if the concentric tubes were correlated to the water geometry;;; 


i would propose an experiment you could try to charge first the big electrode than connect the thinner and see were the bubbles go after the connection... if i´m right somehow the smaller electrode is charging up before the big for some reason.

how can that be...? The water molecules are so tiny
Normally, hydrogen bonds with hydrogen to H2 which is also tiny
O bonds with O and becomes O2 ...... still tiny
The only effect i ever seen that might have some influence is pulse width DC modulation.
The higher the frequency, the smaller the collected bubbles of gas....


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Re: Electrode comparison
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2018, 11:08:24 am »
bigger electrode means:
Gravitational Potential is bigger?

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Re: Electrode comparison
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2018, 14:11:53 pm »
i was thinking mor about the oxygen being 8 times heavier than the hydrogen side so the gravity would pull it down more strongly i guess...

thinking of that i actually was thinking of using that ac to create a short circuit perhaps forcing the hydrogen potential to zero.. this could let us proceed with electrolysis at 100mv or lower

in my opinion this is the main problem with electrolysis... when hydrogen forms on the electrode it develops a potential that like a capacitor will require more energy per electron to make thru and complete the conversion...

if we find a way to take the hydrogen out the process should improve a lot, if could zero up the potential we can generate 1000 times more hydrogen than we expend energy for example if the potential is reduced to 1,24 mV

thats because if we apply 1,24 v it will consume 1,24 watts per amp you use disconsidering resistance losses etc if it was 1,24mV you apply 1,24 miliwatts per amp used...  if we apply 1,24v and this situation happen the only limiting factor will be resistance.. for example if it had 1 ohm resistance it would consume 1watt or so for the same amp.. but if we increase the voltage the power increase squarely...

if the resistance is kept small like 0.1 ohms 

1,24 volts would give 12 amps so it would be like 144 watts

no efficient at all

for it to be tremendous efficient it will require amps being generated at low voltages like the faraday disk or something like

meyer created some especial generators we maybe should get a look at that..

i´m not sure but perhaps a step down transformer with active rectification could solve the trick if the field is allowed to collapse and we get low enough resistance on the system..

ideally we should calculate the resistance per cm2 of the electrode and design from that..

« Last Edit: November 27, 2018, 14:30:08 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: Electrode comparison
« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2018, 14:52:41 pm »
I think we overlook what Newguy was trying here.
Look at his electrode setup.....

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Re: Electrode comparison
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2018, 15:31:36 pm »
interesting! were those coils being pulsed?

i´m dont really believe that magnetic fields could do something... but lets see with or without comparisons so far its already done...

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Re: Electrode comparison
« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2018, 16:57:29 pm »
Herman spoke about a frequency of 7.5hz in his system.
Thats a nice frequency for pulsing electromagnets, from my perspective