Author Topic: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift  (Read 10912 times)

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2012, 14:01:55 pm »
If you get two batteries and connect their negative sides together and try to measure the voltage across the positive leads, you get 0 volts if both batteries had the exact same voltage...

While this may be true for a battery, the battery is generating the power.  An inductor is not a battery and does not function the same way.  An inductor opposes a change in current direction. If the rest of the circuit has current going in a specific direction, the inductor must follow it, regardless of its orientation.  Although it may change the phase, it cannot change the direction of the electron flow and potential and the inductor still has a charge and must discharge somwhere.  That somewhere must be in the same direction as the rest of the circuit.  It would simply introduce resistance to current flow.

TS

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2012, 14:16:57 pm »
A choke is a coil normally not a too big value, that serves to choke off or filter high frequency signals from the line of interest.

A choke with a capacitor in parallel become a resonant choke, because of resonance the impedance at that frequency become immense dozens of times greater than with the choke alone. 

A choke connected in series with a diode being subjected or coupled in a transformer become a charge pump if connected in boost mode.. i don't know if connected in bucking mode... A charge pump mean that it won't have limitation of potential difference, the secondary voltage grows up to the limit. for example a 100v secondary with a diode and a small choke will charge a capacitor up to 3kv...  Thats why is so called a charging choke...

If the same situation of last example but the choke not coupled... the voltage only doubles at the resonant frequency...

So what i mean is that a choke don't choke whatever current off it only creates a high impedance path for ac signals...

You are right when you say the higher the current the voltage decreases, because the higher will be the voltage across the coil so it acts reducing the potential applied... hwr its accumulating it on the coil ok--- 

Ts

Voltage is Voltage... If the inductor is a secondary in a transformer is the same thing as a battery is simply has AC instead of DC... Voltages still add or subtract... If you want to understand is up to you...

Just clearing a secondary of a transformer is a battery with alternating polarity that follow a sine function... and has an impedance due to the frequency and its inductance, also other limitations from core limited size, whatever ... A battery also has an analogous impedance the internal resistance...

Any other inductor coupled to the same transformer, has only two options or add or subtract the voltage if connected in series...

« Last Edit: May 19, 2012, 14:50:26 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2012, 15:01:06 pm »
If you had a choke with its XL 100 ohms and with 100ohms ohmic resistance, than you apply whatever voltage to it, at this specific frequency... The voltage across the coil will aways be? Zero assuming the inductance is constant because the inductive voltage exactly opposes the resistive voltage since V= I*XL=I*R

Is that correct?


To completely understand how the phase angle works read this link with attention... Really good information... http://www.intmath.com/complex-numbers/9-impedance-phase-angle.php

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2012, 15:10:23 pm »
I understand the equation, what's the point?

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2012, 15:13:33 pm »
If the resistance is = the inductive reactance the voltage leads current by 45°

I was wondering what would mean to have 0 volts across the coil... maybe i'm wrong... Completely wrong.. In this case the voltage lead current by 45° so the resistive voltage is not in the same phase as the inductive voltage...
« Last Edit: May 19, 2012, 15:51:13 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #21 on: May 19, 2012, 16:11:19 pm »
sebs, when Stan did his speech in New Zealand, he was asked the frequency used with his devices and he replied, "Typically 0-50Khz". What does his reply mean to you? Why would he say "0hz" implying that a signal is not needed?

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #22 on: May 19, 2012, 16:28:09 pm »
I believe he was taking about the gate... when said this 0 hz... I also think that this is the range he looked into not what he used specifically...

I mean... he created a kind of particle accelerator that works with charge...

This is an example of ionic conduction... The ball is like the ion that capture the electron on one side and deliver at the other side... http://video.mit.edu/watch/conducting-ping-pong-ball-between-capacitor-plates-3280/

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Re: Example of Stan's VIC Transformer with 180* Phase Shift
« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2012, 18:46:30 pm »

Voltage is Voltage... If the inductor is a secondary in a transformer is the same thing as a battery is simply has AC instead of DC... Voltages still add or subtract... If you want to understand is up to you...

Just clearing a secondary of a transformer is a battery with alternating polarity that follow a sine function... and has an impedance due to the frequency and its inductance, also other limitations from core limited size, whatever ... A battery also has an analogous impedance the internal resistance...

Any other inductor coupled to the same transformer, has only two options or add or subtract the voltage if connected in series...

EXCEPT in THIS circuit there is a blocking diode forcing the AC to DC.  As such the inductors currents are being influenced dominantly in one direction.  Where you will still have some resonant action between the coils and the capacitor, the predominant disposition of ALL the coils can only be to flow in one direction.

TS