Author Topic: Stan's Resonant Frequency  (Read 36442 times)

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Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
« Reply #64 on: January 06, 2011, 01:42:58 am »
well the voltage are going to be 180 degrees out of phase, this gives the voltage the pulling attraction that Stan talks about. Ive come to learn you can't go why the waves that Stan has illustrated, most are misleading....for example look at the signal that Stan shows for the 8XA circuit, the real signal looks nothing like that and the way he has it displayed its actually the way it looks with a 20 Hz pulse.

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Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
« Reply #65 on: January 06, 2011, 02:05:04 am »
Just wondering it seems to me that:

Standing waves don't form under just any circumstances.
They require that energy be fed into a system at an appropriate frequency.
That is, when the driving frequency applied to a system equals its natural frequency(water?).
This condition is known as resonance. (believe we are making a resonant based on the frequency of water that why it doesn't matter what type of water)
Standing waves are always associated with resonance. (this is why even your tubes should be tuned to a harmonic of the water)
Resonance can be identified by a dramatic increase in amplitude of the resultant vibrations. (It's all about efficiency)
 
  • shouldn't the resonant frequency of water be used as a reference when building your circuit
  • if your going to have a feed back circuit shouldn't it reflect the changing resonance of the water due to temperature, particulates, pressure....etc.
  • sensors and feed back for the PLL should follow the harmonics of the water with small adjustments to your electronics
  • after the parameters have been sought out on simpler model, chase the holly grail to produce your required output at over unity by perfecting the circuits for performance / efficiency.
  • No reason I can see that a voltage based system at the given frequency can't be built, find what works, then perfect the circuit.

    Others have gone this route before and it seems alot of the information out there confirms that it should be do able this. Ultrasonics, lasers, pressure and waveforms and the resultant vacuum along with other disciplines all seem to point to the same thing we don't know jack.

    One of Stan first patent shows him playing with a point source to produce required gas output, this system would be alot simpler to understand and would give you immediate feed back as to amount of gas  produced, voltages, and the frequencies required for a production model.

    For further reading:

    http://physics.info/waves-standing/

    http://www.waterfuelcarengine.com/stanley-meyers-molecular-dissociation-of-water.html

    http://www.keelynet.com/energy/docx.htm
    « Last Edit: January 06, 2011, 18:29:31 pm by IronWorker »

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    Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
    « Reply #66 on: January 06, 2011, 14:05:29 pm »
    This is one of  the biggest misconception in the process it that people keep trying to find the frequency of water. Forget that water is even in the equation, just think of the cell as a capacitor in a LC circuit. Determine the cells capacitance and the inductance of the inductors and from that find the resonant frequency for that combination. The more voltage at resonance, the more gas you will get.

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    Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
    « Reply #67 on: January 06, 2011, 15:17:05 pm »
    This is one of  the biggest misconception in the process it that people keep trying to find the frequency of water. Forget that water is even in the equation, just think of the cell as a capacitor in a LC circuit. Determine the cells capacitance and the inductance of the inductors and from that find the resonant frequency for that combination. The more voltage at resonance, the more gas you will get.

    I agree on the frequency of water issue here.
    Tony, water is in your setup acting as resistance, is it? So, you get LCRCL..........

    Steve

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    Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
    « Reply #68 on: January 06, 2011, 15:37:23 pm »
    Yes Steve thats correct,  the water has a capacitance and a resistance. Ive noticed at resonance the water does hold a charge, I can take an AC light and hold one lead and touch the other lead to the surface of the water and it will light up. Also I can take my finger and touch the surface of the water and it will give me a nice little shock like a capacitor will.
    SDC10553

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    Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
    « Reply #69 on: January 06, 2011, 15:48:09 pm »
    Have you turned up the variac to higher voltages, yet?
    Why do you stay at 10vdc?

    Steve

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    Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
    « Reply #70 on: January 06, 2011, 16:19:07 pm »
    well its kind of strange, I can turn the variac to almost its half way point before I lose resonance. As I turn the variac up the voltage gets to around 10vdc and wont increase anymore than that, but the voltage in the cell does increase as I turn the variac up.

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    Re: Stan's Resonant Frequency
    « Reply #71 on: January 06, 2011, 18:06:11 pm »
    Yeh, i seen such behaviour here as well, with coils.
    Well, good to know that you tried to raise the voltage.
    Now, its up to find the borders of your setup and find out what you have to change to get over 1500vac at least...