Author Topic: Back to Basics  (Read 3125 times)

0 Members and 6 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Administrator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4567
    • water structure and science
Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2022, 11:27:49 am »
but maybe we are all wrong here and we should listen to good old Bob Boyce and setup a pulsing system that collects power from the aether

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Jr. member
  • *
  • Posts: 15
Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2022, 17:31:00 pm »
Well, I made this test over and over. From DC to 1GHz, it acts as a resistor, with voltage in the cell beign Rcell x Icell. No voltage/current returning when switching off signal, only resistance (voltage and current are linear functions). The cell can hold aprox. 1,5[V] before electrolysis begin and thats all.

As Stan said:
Quote
Water now becomes part of the Voltage Intensifier Circuit in the form of "resistance" between electrical ground and pulsefrequency positive-potential ... helping to prevent electron flow within the pulsing circuit (AA) of Figure 1-1.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 287
Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2022, 12:38:12 pm »
Hello uziao.

We can see the cell behaving like a capacitor below the 2V.
Get a milliamp meter, and an good precision adjustable power supply.

Rise the voltage like 0,25 or 0.5 at a time, you will see the milliamps climb up as you rise the voltage and come down again, until you reach the 2v marks.

Also, if you use a signal generator and an oscilloscope across the cell, you can observe one thing:
You will get a pure dc voltage below 2v threshold, above that, you will have the signal you put in (eg. square wave) and it behaves like a resistor.

If we want to get further on this technology we need to forget about the patents and other stuff and learn by experimenting and observation, Meyer did not gave everything in a silver plate to everybody out there, and don't assume everything he says as the full truth, he was not that stupid to give his work for free.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Jr. member
  • *
  • Posts: 15
Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2022, 02:18:14 am »
Yeah, if you do not have enough voltage to start electrolysis, you have no current flowing, whats the point? How does this relate to high voltage water dissociation? All my tests were made with high voltage and the cell behaves always like a resistor. If you restrict the current, using inductors, you`ll have less voltage in the cell, and therefore less gas, because as I said, Vcell = Rcell X Icell.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 287
Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2022, 12:26:17 pm »
The point is to prove that water behave as dielectric, but under that threshold voltage.
We are on this for years over this forum.
I dont know how many knowledge do yo have about Meyer, but if you are new to this, I suggest you to read the http://www.globalkast.com/docs/International-Independent-Test-Evaluation-Report.pdf and do some math about the production and power.

As a lot of people had seen, there is a lot of bad figures on Meyer numbers, even in this document.

My intention is only save people some time and frustration about this, but everybody has the legitime right to desagree, but the numbers don't lie.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 287
Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #13 on: September 12, 2022, 12:35:16 pm »
Quote
Yeah, if you do not have enough voltage to start electrolysis, you have no current flowing

You do have current flow without electrolysis,  until the "capacitor" charges up.

You can try it with a big cell and you can observe it easily.  ;)

If it looks to you irrelevant, it is up to you, but there is more interesting things happening in the cell that some people do not talk about or is just ignoring.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Jr. member
  • *
  • Posts: 15
Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2022, 15:35:15 pm »
Quote
Yeah, if you do not have enough voltage to start electrolysis, you have no current flowing

You do have current flow without electrolysis,  until the "capacitor" charges up.

You can try it with a big cell and you can observe it easily.  ;)

If it looks to you irrelevant, it is up to you, but there is more interesting things happening in the cell that some people do not talk about or is just ignoring.

Is called displacement current, it is the charge that builds up before the conduction current kicks in.

I'm really confused right now, are we trying to replicate Meyers high voltage, high frequency aparatus, or are we trying to prove some low voltage stuff that has nothing to do with meyer? If you make your cell bigger, you'll have less resistance between the plates and more current will flow for the same voltage. Thats why he moved to the high resistance injectors, he even needed stainless steel enameled wire with high resistance in order to match the transformer to the injectors. What im trying to say, is that the only way to achieve high voltage, with low current in a water bath, is to make the electrodes very small. The cells impedance will never change, even when in resonance, because above 2v, it is a resistor. You cant restrict current in a resistor, you cant violate ohms law, you cant make voltage go up and amps go down in a resistor, the only way is if you make the resistance high enough, making it small enough.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 287
Re: Back to Basics
« Reply #15 on: September 12, 2022, 17:08:23 pm »
Uziao , I agree to desagree...

If you want to know this technology, you should understand any aspect of it.
The point I made about the capacitor under 2V was found experimenting.
About the impedance of the cell never change, it is not completely true.
If you really want to know more about this, search over this forum, or do your homework...  :-\
Cheers.