Author Topic: increasing voltage across the cells  (Read 3763 times)

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increasing voltage across the cells
« on: January 04, 2016, 19:29:49 pm »
I've enjoyed the recent discussions about voltage across the cells.  During tests and observations I've found that a neon bulb put in series with the cells increases the voltage a bit..  Then I tried another one and then another one until I had ten attached in a row.  They cut the amps right down and increase the voltage for each one added.  I was at 650 volts at 12 volts in with ten neons.  The amps went way down and I had to remove a few or change frequency to get some amps.  btw, I use two MOTs with layered 8XA chokes and ten 3", 3/4, 1/2 tube cells.

sadly no more gas yet now I can play with lower amps to find best gas output...

kickback emf

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2016, 22:34:14 pm »
Nice One =)

i used resistors

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2016, 02:57:17 am »
My mistake, what I was looking for was someone to help me understand how a cold cathode neon bulb when put in series with my tubes increases voltage and decreases amperage in my circuit?  These observations came from common analog meters.

????????  Kb

juntian

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2016, 04:01:47 am »
ive noticed when your resonant circuit set up like:   pulsing electrons out of a capacitor,,,  into opposingly wired dual coil inductor,, and into ground,,  then choke will restrict amp flow

higher inductance henries value seems to further oppose currant .

 when you insert the neon tube before the ground then look on oscilliscope and see even higher voltage at point of beginning of choke.

so when you have 2 coils of wire ie. like on a transformer  you can connect the 2 windings 2 different ways. one way give higher henries.


do you know the inductive value of you chokes kickbackemf ? i have a few small plug in wall transformers which range from about 1 - 3 henries when they are wired correctly

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2016, 06:26:31 am »
Nice One =)

i used resistors

I didn't quite catch your explanation of why increasing resistance causes the voltage to increase.  Could you run through that again?  Remember, I'm a highly skilled commercial/industrial electrician but I haven't had any general EE type training.

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2016, 07:01:15 am »
Nice One =)

i used resistors

I didn't quite catch your explanation of why increasing resistance causes the voltage to increase.  Could you run through that again?  Remember, I'm a highly skilled commercial/industrial electrician but I haven't had any general EE type training.

V = √(P x R) is the formula that goes with what he is doing. So, from the formula we can see if you increase resistance you increase the voltage. So, any way you can find to increase the systems resistance while keeping the power factor up will increase the voltage being applied to the load. The hard part is to do so while keeping the power factor up as most totally forget about the power factor and build transformers that are simply too weak to drive the load. I've built many VIC's that would lose practically all it's voltage when connected to the load and through trial and error I am learning how to build them better.
(http://i1025.photobucket.com/albums/y320/h2opower/work%20done%20on%20sept%2018%202012%20002_zpsbfc70e5e.jpg)

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2016, 07:27:38 am »
V = √(P x R) is the formula that goes with what he is doing. So, from the formula we can see if you increase resistance you increase the voltage. So, any way you can find to increase the systems resistance while keeping the power factor up will increase the voltage being applied to the load. The hard part is to do so while keeping the power factor up as most totally forget about the power factor and build transformers that are simply too weak to drive the load.

Thanks.  That seems clear enough.  In my line of work transformer sizing is always done by the engineer who draws up the blue print and is something I haven't had to delve into.  This equation certainly opens some interesting concepts.

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Re: increasing voltage across the cells
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2016, 08:40:53 am »