Author Topic: Electrode Potential..  (Read 6623 times)

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2010, 19:28:02 pm »
The Website Scrood my above post up and lost it!! Yikes


What makes Zinc, or even carbon important in an AA battery? Why is Lead   important in an wet cell battery??? Please Look into this for yourself.   

("What Electrodes does a AA Rechargeable battery use??") "I Bet you can not answer that for yourself!"

 Why where those electrodes selected for the rechargeable AA battery?  (Describe Why)

Have A Read Here http://www.howstuffworks.com/battery.htm/printable

With this, you have Full understandings. Without, you have nothing.



Just saying...

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2010, 20:11:07 pm »
Hardkrome, if you charge the cell, then drain the water, will it still have, say, 6 volts across the tubes?
what can you say about the water being charged compared to the ss being charged?

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2010, 03:08:18 am »
Here is a Better Link. http://www.mpoweruk.com/chemistries.htm

There you can read on zinc being better than copper just to the side of the photo,, Etc,,... Allot of information will not be found on the internet. Much like the Definitions on the internet, Dads 30+ year old webster dictionary has way more in it that can be found on the net, Just as some old books have information on them that you will not find on the net.

The internet is not the thing, You have to just "Come Across" the real information that's out there. I happen to have came across the importance of the electrodes, and wanted to share it.

You would be surprised what is NOT on the internet!!!

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2010, 03:14:35 am »
i read through them i think you have read way to far into electrochemical interactions that create current..
 
  you are reading how alloys chemically interact to create a potential.. (a source/battery)
 
  these battery processes are based on chemical reactions of metals with acids or bases
 
  Stan says verbally on videos the the stainless steel is chemically inert to the process..
  chemically inert means NOT chemically reactive.. 
  Stans exciters have a decomposition rate of like .0001 per year.. last up to 10 thousand years..
 
  Stan was not removing electrons in the fuel cell taking them into the circuit but on a minute level..
  so there is no need for the exciter to take on electrons or pump them   out of a solution.. it needs to pluck them and let them recombine then   they exit and pass though a positive field and oxygen's are ionized. This is when electrons enter the circuit..    Only time electrons are being removed are when the water is already   changed into a fuel gas state..
 
  I try to look at the charging action being due to some perpetuating application of force.. (voltage)
  I dont see the water holding a constant charge like a battery
  I see it being dissipated just as water is to boil under a high heat potential..
  but maybe it just might hold a voltage potential while under pressure   conditions.. kinda how water does when being heated under pressure.
 

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2010, 03:23:41 am »
I couldn't help from posting..

If you view the last above link, When you Strip electrons from the Cathode, And Apply them at the Anode, How is it they do not seem to be where you put them when you go to Certify the attempted process just applied?? Why does it seem as if the electrons Just got away?

I'm referring to charging a fuel cell.


The electrons Striped from the cathode and applied at the anode, as you imagine it,,, They get gone, electrons are lost and oxidation occurs because of electron loss..

1. What is Causing this?
2. How can you prevent it?
« Last Edit: November 25, 2010, 04:11:21 am by Warp »

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2010, 04:19:21 am »
Well if i were to strip from the cathode and apply to the anode it would be done through the circuit not the water..  and if my circuit is built correctly the energy will be stored in the charging inductor not the water..

I think the secret is in the multilayer coil as ancient mist was speaking about.. with the applications of frequency matching the acoustical properties of the cylinder.

Think of it like this. the fuel cell is not charging to where it is holding a static state of equilibrium.. it is being oscillated and that oscillation during off time will dissipate.. stans charging choke is acting like a capacitor and holding the storage of the charge.

He said he can turn power on for something like 10 seconds and produce gas for 90 somthing seconds on the off time.. To me this sounds like a resonant oscillation that slowly dims (dissipates)


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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2010, 06:54:05 am »
Tubes have to be in the water, The voltage across the cell is during run time and is in the cavity.  I happend to notice that after I was pulsing it for a couple of minutes, that the metal was retaining some charge because it is aligning the the water molecules.

The production dosen't start picking up at a fast rate until you hit about 50V across the cell stepping to 100v. The electrostatic bond that holds them together has to be broken.  It surely does not work well with conductive water.

I work with SS everyday at work. As soon as any city water hits it, I get calcium on it. I have chiseled out calcium deposits 2" thick in SS pipes that had warm or hot water going through them. This process can not have any heat at all.

Now having a negative voltage on the negative tube and a positive on the positive tube will keep both tubes clean.





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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2010, 15:18:16 pm »
If your electrodes have a natural voltage difference your stagnant unused cell will slowly produce gas. also all metals used in batteries corrode, SS304 is not chemically reactive with hydrogen, oxygen or water and any deposits are not from the electrodes but from the impurities in the water. So the problems overcome by your theory to use already aligned materials as electrodes has issues that are overcome with SS.
1. your electrodes will corrode rapidly - yet another thing that will need replacing.
2. your electrodes can start production autonomusly.
3. your process is not reversable (lead and leadoxide electrodes would not be counted here)
4. to regain your origninal materials would cost more energy than what you make. (unless you invent a really effficient way to reverse the oxidization process too)
5. Some of your proposed materials are autoreactive in water.
 
If the blend of SS304 stan used had high percentages of Zinc then it might be helpful but i would think that this would corrode over time, and not the time frame Stan talks off.