Author Topic: Electrode Potential..  (Read 6622 times)

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Electrode Potential..
« on: November 22, 2010, 06:29:39 am »
Electrode Potential... What is it? What could this be?




Carbon, Atomic Number 6, Has 4 electrons orbiting its valence shell.
Zinc, Atomic number 30, Has 2 electrons orbiting its Valence shell.
Nickel Atomic number 28, Has also 2 electrons orbiting its Valence shell.


Basic Battery Operations, Positive Carbon Pole with a Zinc negative Termial. Electrons Freely travel due to the Choice of Electrodes.

Within batterys the electrodes must not be the same. This way with a carbon Pole having only 4 electrons in its valence shell, and the zinc 2, the charged electrons in the past wants to travel from the carbon to the zinc (BECAUSE OF THE CHOICE OF ELECTRODES.)

Zinc, What does it look like? Take a NONE rechargeable batteries wrapper off, Scrap clean. That's what Zinc looks like! Excluding 9 volt batteries. Those of you that knew Herman Anderson. His electrod of choice was Nickel. His electrode was about 13.5 inches in diameter and Nickel Plated. The other Electrode is unknown to me.

Meyer, SS Electrode Vs SS electrode. Wast of time. (There is NO "ELECTRODE POTENTIAL" There.)

Google = (Electrode Potential) and Include in your Brain, Electrons in Valence Shells.

Potassium Hydroxide = Electrolyte..

HOWSTUFFWORKS.COM = Battery, (Have A Read On Electrodes.)

Good Day...

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2010, 15:38:57 pm »
Quote
Electrode Potential... What is it? What could this be?




Carbon, Atomic Number 6, Has 4 electrons orbiting its valence shell.
Zinc, Atomic number 30, Has 2 electrons orbiting its Valence shell.
Nickel Atomic number 28, Has also 2 electrons orbiting its Valence shell.


Basic   Battery Operations, Positive Carbon Pole with a Zinc negative Termial.   Electrons Freely travel due to the Choice of Electrodes.

Within   batterys the electrodes must not be the same. This way with a carbon   Pole having only 4 electrons in its valence shell, and the zinc 2, the   charged electrons in the past wants to travel from the carbon to the   zinc (BECAUSE OF THE CHOICE OF ELECTRODES.)

Zinc, What does it   look like? Take a NONE rechargeable batteries wrapper off, Scrap clean.   That's what Zinc looks like! Excluding 9 volt batteries. Those of you   that knew Herman Anderson. His electrod of choice was Nickel. His   electrode was about 13.5 inches in diameter and Nickel Plated. The other   Electrode is unknown to me.

Meyer, SS Electrode Vs SS electrode. Wast of time. (There is NO "ELECTRODE POTENTIAL" There.)

Google = (Electrode Potential) and Include in your Brain, Electrons in Valence Shells.

Potassium Hydroxide = Electrolyte..

HOWSTUFFWORKS.COM = Battery, (Have A Read On Electrodes.)

Good Day...





nice observation warp,

I can see where your coming from when it comes to the electrodes gaining a potential... The question is do the electrodes need to gain a quantitative representation of potential or do they need a jolting change of statel to step charge water?

All in all what im saying is you can look at voltage as static or as dynamic..
During dynamic states the force is progressively changing at a rate that is determined by amps and resistance.. that resistance is a back pressure to current flow..  how much current is flowing multiplied by the resistive back pressure force = voltage being applied

To find the voltage of a circuit you do V=IR current flow rate times the resistance tells you the voltage within a circuit..   
Higher current flow to any resistance will be higher voltage. if the resistive element cannot handle the higher current it gets hot and expands (takes on energy) to a state of less resistance...
What im trying to get at is voltage can be seen as a static potential where all the valence electrons are removed and is justified to be voltage potential..
Or it can be see as a dynamic force which is  them going into transit. the speed of their transit while working against the back pressure that restricts them...   so the speed at which the valence electrons can be removed from the electrode may justify electromagnetic force that yields a higher potential of voltage due to velocity of transit in a given second..

I feel we are trying to perpetuate higher states of potential in water and i don't think the electrodes need a quantitative static charge to do so..

Stan refers to them as excitors in the tech brief not once did he refer to them as electrodes

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2010, 21:20:58 pm »
One 304 S.S. tube Will become positive charged and the other 304 S.S. tube will Become Negative Charged. Just like he says, he did not stretch the truth on that. 

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2010, 07:53:58 am »
One 304 S.S. tube Will become positive charged and the other 304 S.S. tube will Become Negative Charged. Just like he says, he did not stretch the truth on that.

You can Take A Zinc Electrode and an Carbon electrode and Place it into water. The Carbon Carrying 4 electrons in its valence shell will be positively charged as it (Takes In) the electrons in the water Paste (From the "Charged" zinc) carrying only 2 electrons in its valence shell. It is Clear why the carbon here in this case took on the Positive charge! At least it should be, If it is not clear, Stop your work and take up chemistry for a couple of months to help, (Open your mind.)

HOWEVER, Carbon Becomes the Positive electrode because of its valence shells behavior and the zincs behaviour, There Exist a Mystery alloy (Found in NiMh Rechargeables) Wiki, And once this metal Replaces the Carbon The Zinc then becomes the Positive Lead, A very Abnormal behavour and yet (All proven in tap water.)

Take A rechargeable battery apart, Disassemble its TOP with a Tube Cutter. (Remove its Positive anode Arm.) See Just how important the Laughable alloy is for allowing electrons to exit its liquid. You'll quickly see the AA battery become Useless when removing the arm witch Dips into the past. Try Bypassing it with a simple Prob needle from a Multimeter with No Effect!!!

There's a reason Your Fuel cells are oxidizing on its terminal. Can not you understand that by this the electrode potential is None equal (As It Virginly was!) De virginized electrodes with the oxidization only creats a very small electrode potential. IF Both were equal, Electrons wouldn't flow. This can be Tuned with this knowledge. However, Oxidization accures and theres electrolysis.

1 304, Placed Near 1 316L electrode is Better than --- 2 304 electrodes, or even 2 316 electrodes.


if you're wondering what zinc looks like, Check out the tubes in stans video. As you can see when thought to be Stainless steel while viewing the famous youtube video clearly it doesn't look to be ss as the tubes appear dark, or dull. Zinc carries a very similar look, there is also zinc coating, Allthough herman used Nickel.

As your quote stated, (Will Become.) Right you are! But, with a WISE selection, it (Already Is/(Fixed).) The Electrons "in any Paste/Electrolyte" are looking for somewhere to go, It is the Choice of electrode Potential that will determine their electron ejections direction and ionic cation movements!!!!!

Just a Thought I once again shared.

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2010, 20:11:13 pm »
The difference is like a 0.1v per tube. Thats a gain, but not very much.
For a tubecell it does matter.
Not sure how to use this in drycells....



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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2010, 01:52:23 am »
Well I am far enough along to know what I am seeing, as I have it in front of me.

The SS will charge up and hold a charge, aligning the water molecules   between them. (without the circuit attached)  I have had in upwards of   6v difference between the tubes after its shut off, 2v after 24hrs.  The higher the water charges up, the higher the potential between the tubes is. At a ratio of course. He says they hold enough of their charge during gating (T3) to keep the cell from discharging. That means the tubes maintain the charge at full rate during that time.
 
  The 304 Stainless tubes do this because pulsing brings on atomic   particle alignment in the metal. Positives on outside, negatives on the   inside, depending on which tube it is.  (it forms its own anode and cathode on each tube)

No current, no chemicals.  Its electrostatic.

The tubes stay Clean. No white stuff, since there is no current.


 

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2010, 09:46:05 am »
Well I am far enough along to know what I am seeing, as I have it in front of me.

The SS will charge up and hold a charge, aligning the water molecules   between them. (without the circuit attached)  I have had in upwards of   6v difference between the tubes after its shut off, 2v after 24hrs.  The higher the water charges up, the higher the potential between the tubes is. At a ratio of course. He says they hold enough of their charge during gating (T3) to keep the cell from discharging. That means the tubes maintain the charge at full rate during that time.
 
  The 304 Stainless tubes do this because pulsing brings on atomic   particle alignment in the metal. Positives on outside, negatives on the   inside, depending on which tube it is.  (it forms its own anode and cathode on each tube)

No current, no chemicals.  Its electrostatic.

The tubes stay Clean. No white stuff, since there is no current.


 


Does the gasproduction continue on the same level as with strait dc, Hardkrome?
With strait dc, i also see lots a charge in the water.
With my drycell, i can light a bulb on it after shutting down the power, but gasproduction really is half, when pulsing a 50% squarewave....

steve

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Re: Electrode Potential..
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2010, 19:10:41 pm »
What makes Zinc, or even carbon important in an AA battery? Why is Lead   important in an wet cell battery??? Please Look into this for yourself. 

("What Electrodes does an AA Rechargeable battery use?? & WHY") "I Bet you can not answer that for yourself!"

 Why where those electrodes selected for the rechargeable AA battery?  (Describe Why)

What must the ATOM look like in SS 304, How many electrons in its valence shell? How about 316?

Have you found the Perodic chart for electrodes? Did you see SS on the list?
 
Great Read http://www.howstuffworks.com/battery.htm/printable

http://www.corrosion-doctors.org/Corrosion-Thermodynamics/Standard-potential.htm


http://www.google.com/#hl=en&&sa=X&ei=9lbtTI7dFISClAfuxrn_AQ&ved=0CBcQvwUoAQ&q=standard+electrode+potential+table&spell=1&fp=b69933d19f024e3b

With this, you have Full understandings. Without, you have nothing.

Just saying...