Author Topic: Ultrasonic Nebulizer Array 3000mL per hour Cold Fog Generator WATER BURNS  (Read 79773 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 152
Re: Ultrasonic Nebulizer Array 3000mL per hour Cold Fog Generator WATER BURNS
« Reply #80 on: September 15, 2011, 11:13:36 am »
 Here is the next best piece of info I just found I think everyone will like.
 
 Here are a few words from it.
 
 CHARGING MECHANISMS 43
 a back-emf is built up that cancels the original field of the contact
 potential across the plates, at which point the flow of ions ceases. A
 potential equal to the contact potential will now appear across the
 switch and a situation such as shown in Fig. 21b will be reached.
 The presence of ions between two electrodes of dissimilar materials
 and their ability to generate a steady current is nothing less than a
 galvanic cell. The primary source of energy is the ionization agency
 which might be radioactivity or cosmic rays as in the case of our
 ionized atmosphere. Ions are also produced in liquids where one or
 both electrode materials might slowly go into solution in the form of
 ions. The dissolved ions supply the energy that drives galvanic
 currents through circuits and usually at the cost of the lower work
 function material itself. A typical example is the flashlight battery or
 dry cell. Most charging processes involving ions are electrochemical 

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 152
Re: Ultrasonic Nebulizer Array 3000mL per hour Cold Fog Generator WATER BURNS
« Reply #81 on: September 28, 2011, 08:31:27 am »
(http://peswiki.com/images/1/1b/Radiant_energy_antenna_system_01.JPG)
 Electron Extraction Circuit
 http://peswiki.com/index.php/OS:Radiant_...nna_System

 
 
 This looks to be a good electron extraction circuit... Something tells me Stans Drawings aren't always right , but close enough to see how it works.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2011, 21:10:23 pm by fastimports3 »

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 270
Re: Ultrasonic Nebulizer Array 3000mL per hour Cold Fog Generator WATER BURNS
« Reply #82 on: September 28, 2011, 13:35:57 pm »
Cool article! I have been researching over the summer with electroculture which uses devices exactly like these. They say Tesla ultimately was the true inventor of this type of device, but, I have documentation that shows the almost exact same circuits were used for hundreds of years before him.


(http://www.rexresearch.com/christofleau/elcult1.jpg)


(http://www.rexresearch.com/christofleau/elcult4.jpg)

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 152
Re: Ultrasonic Nebulizer Array 3000mL per hour Cold Fog Generator WATER BURNS
« Reply #83 on: September 28, 2011, 21:15:09 pm »
I'm planning to pair this with antenna extract to try and strip the electrons

Lord Kelvin's Thunderstorm Gen
http://youtu.be/hQmAIo6JWMU

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 85
Re: Ultrasonic Nebulizer Array 3000mL per hour Cold Fog Generator WATER BURNS
« Reply #84 on: September 29, 2011, 00:37:38 am »
A thought:
in making the gas processor? with the ..led's and mesh for the electron extraction, might it be useful to look at existing airflow meters as something already available in a common inlet duct sizing, which also has a s/s mesh that could be used at the electron gathering part ofthe system? its possible by making a series of led holder that can be secured to the airflow meter body. On the air flow meter bodies that use the hotwire - that assembly can be removed in its entirety. That might be a simple place to start? What Im unsure about, by looking at the pictures of stans gas processor and also by looking at H20Powers manufactured GP is where does the exciter coil/plates go? just a thought.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 152
Re: Ultrasonic Nebulizer Array 3000mL per hour Cold Fog Generator WATER BURNS
« Reply #85 on: September 29, 2011, 23:34:25 pm »
Here's today's experiments on the extraction circuit. Will do more once I get sum super fine mesh SS screen.


Offline Login to see usernames

  • Administrator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4441
    • water structure and science
Re: Ultrasonic Nebulizer Array 3000mL per hour Cold Fog Generator WATER BURNS
« Reply #86 on: September 29, 2011, 23:59:05 pm »
Here's today's experiments on the extraction circuit. Will do more once I get sum super fine mesh SS screen.


Hi Fi3,

I am fascinated by your video. Can you explain a bit more about yr setup?
As far as i understand it, you create steam, ad uv light and then you measure 15ac?
Are you also ionizing the fog first?

Wel done!

Steve

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 152
Re: Ultrasonic Nebulizer Array 3000mL per hour Cold Fog Generator WATER BURNS
« Reply #87 on: September 30, 2011, 05:20:08 am »
 Electrostatic Charge Generation in Liquid Systems
  Electrostatic charge is generated in a number of ways whenever there is friction between two bodies moving relative to one another. Charge generation occurs in liquid systems on the molecular level at the interface of any two unlike materials, so a static charge will be generated in any moving fluid, with positive or negative charges moving from the fluid onto the bounding surface. The causes of electrostatic charging include the following examples:
 
  •   Friction caused by fluid flowing in pipes
  •   High fluid velocities
  •   Fluids flowing in ungrounded pipes and hoses
  •   Passage of fluids through filter elements or other microporous structures
  •   Generated by turbulence in the liquids and by pumping elements, especially centrifugal pumps
  •   Fluid discharging on to the free surface of the reservoir
  •   When free air is present in the liquid, for example, in bearing and paper machine return lines
  •   Imparted into the liquid when component surfaces sliding is relative to one another
  •   Fluid acquires a charge when it flows through a pipe or microporous structure, and when this charge is carried downstream, it’s called a streaming current (Figure 1).
    (http://media.noria.com/sites/archive_images/Backup_200511_tech-electro-fig1.jpg)
     Figure 1. Streaming Current
    In pipeline flow, the streaming current will be discharged back to the pipe walls, reservoir or component surfaces, and the discharge rate is controlled by the characteristics of the fluid and its additives. This charge relaxation is described by the equations below:
     (http://media.noria.com/sites/archive_images/Backup_200511_tech-electro-fig1.gif)
     where:
     Qt = charge at time t
     Qo = initial charge
     t = charge relaxation time constant (representing 37 percent charge decay)
     E = dielectric constant of liquid (approximately 2 for oils)
     E0 = absolute dielectric constant of a vacuum (8.854 x 10 - 12 F/m)
     K = fluid rest conductivity (pS/m)
     If the component walls are conductive, then a charge will be induced on the walls, which is of opposite polarity to the fluid. If the exterior surface is grounded, the net charge will be zero. If not, the charge will accumulate to eventually discharge. This will generate an electrostatic discharge where the charge discharges to a surface at lower voltage. In doing so, it can generate a high-energy spark. If the discharge occurs in air, the results can be both spectacular and potentially harmful (Figure 2).
     Electrostatic discharge usually manifests itself as a clicking sound as charge repeatedly increases and discharges to surfaces of lower voltage (usually earth or ground) through sparking. The clicking frequency depends on the charging rate. Clearly, if the discharge occurs in a flammable atmosphere the effect can be serious, but these instances are rare. A discharge within the system is usually short-lived and extinguished by the hydraulic fluid. This can result in etching of the discharged surface, perhaps removing microscopic particles and leaving carbon deposits on the surface. There is also evidence that localized discharge can result from lubricated surfaces, especially in geared and bearing systems with a high air content. This can contribute to pitting of surfaces.