Author Topic: Ultrasonic Nebulizer Array 3000mL per hour Cold Fog Generator WATER BURNS  (Read 79771 times)

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Maybe this is Stan's True secret of the LC Series Circuit?(http://procoent.com/forum/Smileys/yarex2/huh.gif)

Example
If   we measure the ac voltages across L and C, we find vL = 43v and vC =   33v. Yet our source voltage is still just 10v. What's going on here? How   can we get 76v across two components in series across a 10v source?

The   Vectors
The vectors in a series LC circuit.

The answer is   clear when we look at the voltage vectors in this circuit. They are   shown to the right.

Since this is a series circuit, the current   is the same throughout the circuit. With no circuit resistance, there is   no resistive voltage, so we simply show the current vector in red, at   the reference phase angle of 0°.

We know that voltage leads   current in an inductance, so we show vL at a phase angle of +90°. We   also know that voltage lags current in a capacitance, so we show vC at   -90°. And this gives us our first clue as to what is happening in this   circuit and how we can get both vL and vC to be higher than the source   voltage: they oppose each other, and at least partially cancel each   other out. It is the difference between these two voltages that must   match the source voltage, and sure enough, 43v - 33v = 10v.

RE:   Hydrogen Fracturing Process Memo WFC 420
_________________________________________________ ____________________________
Stanley   A. Meyer 1 - 3
LC Voltage
The voltage across the inductor (C) or capacitor (ER) is   greater than the applied voltage (H). At
frequency close to   resonance, the voltage across the individual components is higher than   the applied
voltage
(H), and, at resonant frequency, the   voltage VT across both the inductor and the c:apacitor are
theoretically   infinite. However, physical constraints of components and circuit   interaction prevents the
voltage from reaching infinity.

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Sure enough that is the case , its absolutely essential to understand those vectors and the resultant impedance of a given load .

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    • water structure and science
Maybe this is Stan's True secret of the LC Series Circuit?(http://procoent.com/forum/Smileys/yarex2/huh.gif)

Example
If   we measure the ac voltages across L and C, we find vL = 43v and vC =   33v. Yet our source voltage is still just 10v. What's going on here? How   can we get 76v across two components in series across a 10v source?

The   Vectors
The vectors in a series LC circuit.

The answer is   clear when we look at the voltage vectors in this circuit. They are   shown to the right.

Since this is a series circuit, the current   is the same throughout the circuit. With no circuit resistance, there is   no resistive voltage, so we simply show the current vector in red, at   the reference phase angle of 0°.

We know that voltage leads   current in an inductance, so we show vL at a phase angle of +90°. We   also know that voltage lags current in a capacitance, so we show vC at   -90°. And this gives us our first clue as to what is happening in this   circuit and how we can get both vL and vC to be higher than the source   voltage: they oppose each other, and at least partially cancel each   other out. It is the difference between these two voltages that must   match the source voltage, and sure enough, 43v - 33v = 10v.

RE:   Hydrogen Fracturing Process Memo WFC 420
_________________________________________________ ____________________________
Stanley   A. Meyer 1 - 3
LC Voltage
The voltage across the inductor (C) or capacitor (ER) is   greater than the applied voltage (H). At
frequency close to   resonance, the voltage across the individual components is higher than   the applied
voltage
(H), and, at resonant frequency, the   voltage VT across both the inductor and the c:apacitor are
theoretically   infinite. However, physical constraints of components and circuit   interaction prevents the
voltage from reaching infinity.
Very good fastimport,

Phase difference is the most logical step on the road to get zero amps and high voltage. Stan seems to cut off power to the resonant circuit after the voltage peak and before the current peak came in.

Steve

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Yes, voltage step-up only helps if the water molecule disassociation happened by electrostatic force, which would be making use of reactive power. With normal electrolysis even a parallel resonant circuit wouldn't help (normally steps-up current) because in a plate capacitor with water in between the current-leakage through the water can be modelled as a ohmic resistor in parallel.

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And thats the big question, is it......
Does a voltage field split the water molecule or not.
 
The only fenomenon with water and volts is that with higher volts, higher amps flow thru it.
 
 
Steve

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Excellent Electrical Reference Site
www.play-hookey.com

Also the secret to more then just the fuel cell seems to be in reactive power.
This is a quote from one of my dads engineering books.

"Side BC of triangle is equal to EI sin 0 and is lagging the voltage by 90 degrees.
This power is generally referred to as reactive power, reactive power component or reactive load. In practical power applications this component should be made as small as possible, because while doing no useful work it causes additional heating of windings and conductors through which it circulates."


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            (http://www.tpub.com/content/doe/h1011v1/img/h1011v1_29_1.jpg)    (http://www.tpub.com/content/doe/h1011v1/img/h1011v1_29_2.jpg)          (http://www.tpub.com/content/doe/h1011v1/img/h1011v1_29_3.jpg)        Basic Electrical Theory   ATOM AND ITS FORCES  The strength of the attraction or of the repulsion force depends upon two factors:  (1) the amount  of charge on each object, and (2) the distance between the objects.   The greater the charge on  the objects, the greater the electrostatic field.   The greater the distance between the objects, the  weaker  the  electrostatic  field  between  them,  and  vice  versa.    This  leads  us  to  the  law  of  electrostatic attraction, commonly referred to as Coulomb’s Law of electrostatic charges, which  states that the force of electrostatic attraction, or repulsion, is directly proportional to the product  of  the  two  charges  and  inversely  proportional  to  the  square  of  the  distance  between  them  as  shown in Equation 1-1.  (1-1)  F  K  q1  q2  d2  where  F   = force of electrostatic attraction or prepulsion (Newtons)  K   = constant of proportionality (Coulomb2/N-m2)  q1  = charge of first particle (Coulombs)  q2  = charge of second particle (Coulombs)  d   = distance between two particles (Meters)  If  q1   and  q2   are  both  either  Figure 7    Potential Difference Between Two Charged Objects  positively   or   negatively  charged, the force is repulsive.  If    q1    and    q2    are    opposite  polarity or charge, the force is  attractive.  Potential Difference  Potential difference is the term  used to describe how large the  electrostatic  force  is  between  two   charged   objects.   If   a  charged   body   is   placed  between   two   objects   with   a  potential   difference,   the  charged body will try to move  in   one   direction,   depending  upon the polarity of the object.   If an electron is placed between a negatively-charged body and  a positively-charged body, the action due to the potential difference is to push the electron toward  the positively-charged object.   The electron, being negatively charged, will be repelled from the  negatively-charged object and attracted by the positively-charged object, as shown in Figure 7. 



   

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                    (http://www.tpub.com/content/doe/h1011v1/img/h1011v1_30_1.jpg)        ATOM AND ITS FORCES   Basic Electrical Theory  Due to the force of its electrostatic field, these electrical charges have the ability to do work by  moving another charged particle by attraction and/or repulsion.  This ability to do work is called  "potential";  therefore,  if  one  charge  is  different  from  another,  there  is  a  potential  difference  between them.   The sum of the potential differences of all charged particles in the electrostatic  field is referred to as electromotive force (EMF).  The  basic  unit  of  measure  of  potential  difference  is  the  "volt."    The  symbol  for  potential  difference is "V," indicating the ability to do the work of forcing electrons to move.   Because  the volt unit is used, potential difference is also called "voltage."   The unit volt will be covered  in greater detail in the next chapter.  Free Electrons  Electrons are in rapid motion around the nucleus.   While the electrostatic force is trying to pull  the nucleus and the electron together, the electron is in motion and trying to pull away.   These  two  effects  balance,  keeping  the  electron  in  orbit.   The  electrons  in  an  atom  exist  in  different  energy levels.   The energy level of an electron is proportional to its distance from the nucleus.  Higher energy level electrons exist in orbits, or shells, that are farther away from the nucleus.  These shells nest inside one another and surround the nucleus.   The nucleus is the center of all  the shells.   The shells are lettered beginning with the shell nearest the nucleus:   K, L, M, N, O,  P, and Q.  Each shell has a maximum number of electrons it can hold.  For example, the K shell  will hold a maximum of two electrons and the L shell will hold a maximum of eight electrons.  As  shown  in  Figure 8,  each  shell  has  a  specific  number  of  electrons  that  it  will  hold  for  a  particular atom.  Figure 8    Energy Shells and Electron Quota