Author Topic: Physics  (Read 1773 times)

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Physics
« on: August 02, 2009, 02:21:00 am »
Donald says:
http://video.yahoo.com/watch/5280876
*~Tory ~* says:
this is cool!
Donald says:
he seems to think an atomic laser is a big deal
*~Tory ~* says:
seems to
Donald says:
Stan invented one 20 years ago
*~Tory ~* says:
hahahaha
*~Tory ~* says:
so in other words, this guy is a wee bit behind...
Donald says:
a Hydrogen Laser, or EASER as he calls it
*~Tory ~* says:
cool
Donald says:
http://waterpoweredcar.com/pdf.files/smeyer4.pdf
*~Tory ~* says:
oh wow
*~Tory ~* says:
that is a lot of info!
Donald says:
i think he has another section on it too
*~Tory ~* says:
wow
Donald says:
i've learned a lot about (hmm, a little) about quantum mechanics, string theory and other various physics topics today, but even more than i've learned, i've made connections to thing i've already known
*~Tory ~* says:
that is good, it helps when you can connect it all together
Donald says:
for example, we have classical physics, which 'holds true' at a life size scale, but breaks down at the atomic scale
Donald says:
there you need quantum mechanics
*~Tory ~* says:
right
Donald says:
and in quantum mechanics, things like energy conservation and the laws of thermodynamics to not apply
Donald says:
you can have particles in two places at once, you can have them travel back in time
*~Tory ~* says:
wow
Donald says:
they can do back flips and stuff
Donald says:
but what is the difference between the classical world and the quantum world?
Donald says:
where some laws apply and some dont?
Donald says:
it's the same nature out there
*~Tory ~* says:
hhmmmm
Donald says:
so then as Michio Kaku just mentioned
Donald says:
about Bose-Einstein Condensates
*~Tory ~* says:
yeah
Donald says:
it's like having one large atom... so you can use quantum laws at a classical scale
Donald says:
he talks about getting the atoms to vibrate in unison
*~Tory ~* says:
yeah
Donald says:
the problem is, as far as he knows, you have to go as close as you can to Absolute zero
Donald says:
but he's missing something
Donald says:
can you guess what it is
*~Tory ~* says:
well, they haven't obtained absolute zero yet have they....?
Donald says:
no, and you don't need to
Donald says:
water is a dipole, put it between two voltage zones of opposite polarity, and all the molecules line up in accordance with opposite electrical attraction of charges
Donald says:
pulse that voltage field and you have all the atoms vibrating in unison
*~Tory ~* says:
interesting
Donald says:
based on what he said in that video
Donald says:
that lets you play with the quantum rules at a classical scale

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Re: Physics
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2009, 02:58:56 am »
lol what is this crap?

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Re: Physics
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2009, 05:36:58 am »
I don't know if you have read into Quantum Mechanics at all, but basically there are a handful of different theories in Physics, each works well in it's own domain but all of them break down in certain areas. Classical/Newtonian Physics is one theory that works well with everyday objects that we interact with, but it breaks down at the atomic level, Quantum Mechanics is another theory that works well with atomic and subatomic particles, and String Theory is another theory that has to do with subatomic vibrations and up to 10 or 11 dimensions.

In this video he's talking about using Bose-Einstein Condensates to perform Quantum mechanics experiments at a macroscopic scale. That means performing atomic sized experiments on life sized objects.

Bose-Einstein Condensates are Atoms cooled down to nearly Absolute Zero, this causes the Atoms to condense, or collapse, and then they are collectively responsive as if the collection of Atoms was a single Atom. They all vibrate and resonate together as one.

Because performing experiments on a single Atom is extremely difficult, this enables you to perform the same experiments, and get the same results, on something that is physically much larger... so you can see it with your own eyes, and this makes it useful.

How this relates to Stan is that he is creating the same effect as they get from a Bose-Einstein Condensate at room temperature, by using voltage to line up the water molecules and pulsing them to get them to all resonate at the same time.

In this video he also mentions an atomic laser, as being a great goal desired to be accomplished, something Stan did 20 years ago, without using absolute zero temperatures. Stan really is way ahead of everyone.

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Re: Physics
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2009, 07:17:53 am »
Silicon is not going away anytime soon .

Itll take millenia to teach people about this .

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Re: Physics
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2009, 10:19:19 am »
I agree it'll take some people longer to grasp things than others, but there's not much we can do about that, no matter how simple the explanations are, there are always fools blind to logic.

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Re: Physics
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2009, 16:47:04 pm »
yeah its sad that people are so ignorant to the truth.. whats even more sad is a lot of intellect can fall in this category as well .. sometimes i think ignorance is more of habitual hopelessness.. people that have been conned one to many times follow the saying if it seems to good to be tru then it most likey is..  i think if you could find away to project hope such as a workinging unit and had away to hit a lot of people publicly with it.. concert or somthin.. then you may strike hope and reignite the curiousity to the blind.