Author Topic: Water vs. human body measurements  (Read 1469 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Login to see usernames

  • Administrator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4547
    • water structure and science
Water vs. human body measurements
« on: March 05, 2009, 13:58:49 pm »
Hi,

I think it is a good thing if we compare the human body with water.
What counts for measering the humanbody also counts for water.
For sure, we know that mr. Puharich was doing it.
Water is the main component of the human body where it represents 58 to 62%, of the body weight. In
many pathological cases this quantity varies.

A biological tissue is an ionic conductor: it is known that electrical conduction in a material
occurs through charge carriers, which may be electrons, such as is the case for metals; or free ions in
suspension in solutions, as is the case for biological tissues.
If a direct current is passed through an ionized solution, the well-known phenomenon of polarization
occurs, i.e. very rapidly at the level of each electrode a double layer of ions is deposited which acts as
an insulator and prevents the current from passing. Therefore, a direct current cannot be used to
measure the resistance of such a conductor.

Because it is a heterogeneous conductor: i.e. it is composed of both resistive elements and [noref]
capacitive elements diversely associated. Whereas the resistive elements allow the alternating current
to pass whatever its frequency, the capacitive elements allow the alternating current to pass only
if it has a high frequency.


Please read attached document and tell me what you think of this compared to our research.

br
Steve

Online Login to see usernames

  • Administrator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4547
    • water structure and science
Re: Water vs. human body measurements
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2009, 14:08:30 pm »
Hi,

If you read this document, you can make a conclusion that a frequency of 1mhz is the best frequency for penetrating the watermolecules.

br
Steve