Author Topic: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell  (Read 40714 times)

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Re: Meyer’s Preliminary Stages Part 2 (CONTINUED)
« Reply #72 on: February 27, 2011, 18:03:30 pm »
Meyer’s Preliminary Stages Part 2 (CONTINUED):
 
I updated the reply #71 photo which now indentifies the gauges as well.  Here is a frame extracted from the news coverage video which shows the 120VAC capacitor start motor driving the alternator (just like he did on his lab bench) with a fan belt...
 
(TO BE CONTINUED)
« Last Edit: March 17, 2011, 03:31:00 am by mina »

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Meyer’s Preliminary Stages Part 2 (CONTINUED):
« Reply #73 on: February 28, 2011, 00:25:24 am »
Meyer’s Preliminary Stages Part 2 (CONTINUED):
 
Now many of you have seen some of these pictures before but I wanted to group them all together in this thread for those who haven’t seen them.  Some things I’m presenting are new (like the toggle switch/multiple tube set controller theory) and some things are only new to new arrivals.
 
Here’s a shot of the GIANT cell where Stan combines them all in this huge flanged container...
 
(TO BE CONTINUED)

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Re: Meyer’s Preliminary Stages Part 2 (CONTINUED)
« Reply #74 on: March 02, 2011, 06:22:31 am »
Meyer’s Preliminary Stages Part 2 (CONTINUED):
 
The dune buggy ended up fitted with everything from his lab/shop bench, only scaled up to enable the WFC system to fuel a 4 cylinder internal combustion engine.  This was his former WFC system and not the later “injection” style system that can be seen in the 1992 interview video.
 
Now two parts of the system required 120VAC in order to operate.  These were the single phase capacitor start 120VAC motor and the variable transformer.  To power these items, he would obviously need an onboard AC power supply so Stan also installed such a system called a Redi-line electric generator.  It requires 12VDC input and delivers 120VAC @15 amps output.
 
Some have speculated over the years that Stan could NOT have used an inverter because of the efficiency problems but many believe Stan chose the Redi-line alternative in order to insure smooth sine wave AC as the inverters often tend to put out flat square wave AC in contrast.
 
The redi-line electric generator was mounted at the rear of the vehicle on the passenger side as shown in the snapshot below... 

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #75 on: March 02, 2011, 10:37:23 am »
Hi mina you mean that he had a motor, an alternator and also a generator in the buggy?


I think the combination motor and generator is the easier way to have a controlled frequency source... So you can have a given coil and capacitance and tune to it..






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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #76 on: March 02, 2011, 16:36:15 pm »
the rediline generator is a rotary-converter that turns 12VDC from the battery/conventional alternator into 60 Hz AC to run the Constant Speed AC Motor, which drives the Alternator which is also fed with rectified and pulsed AC into the field windings

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #77 on: March 03, 2011, 01:25:34 am »
Hi mina you mean that he had a motor, an alternator and also a generator in the buggy?


I think the combination motor and generator is the easier way to have a controlled frequency source... So you can have a given coil and capacitance and tune to it..

 @Sebosfato:
Yes, you can see all three components in the previous snapshots I’ve posted recently in this thread.  The Redi-line is also in the snapshot of (Reply #71) the giant control panel.  It’s on the left hand side of this control panel and is partially cut off.

It’s just as Donaldwfc stated in his last posting.  Stan opted for the Redi-line as his preferred way to convert 12VDC into 120VAC.  I’ve seen these Redi-line units hooked up to RVs before and they work beautifully.  They do not engage until they are loaded.  This is built into the unit’s design.

Regards,
mina
« Last Edit: March 03, 2011, 02:02:17 am by mina »

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #78 on: March 03, 2011, 05:00:58 am »
Nice thanks,


I wish i could put my hands on it to try understanding whats happening.


But if this is true. Why the alternator and the other electric motor ?


Or you mean that he used only for the electric pumps...?


Regards
Fabio

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #79 on: March 03, 2011, 07:38:32 am »
Nice thanks,


I wish i could put my hands on it to try understanding whats happening.


But if this is true. Why the alternator and the other electric motor ?


Or you mean that he used only for the electric pumps...?


Regards
Fabio

@Sebosfato:
If you look closely at the documentary “It Runs on Water”, you will see the same 120VAC motor driving an alternator which in turn powers the electronics that pulse the cell.  So all Meyer really did was to move the same AC motor and the same alternator (which is driven by a fan belt) onto the back of his dune buggy.  There is no pump.

If you watch the news clip where Meyer drives down the highway in the dune buggy, pay close attention to the very beginning.  The video shows Meyer filling the cell with water.  If a pump were involved, he would be filling a water tank that was separate from the cell and a pump would automatically keep the cell full of water (float switch or level indicator). 

The pressure build up in the cell was the force that delivered the gas (hydroxy) to the carburetor.  No pumps of any kind were used.  He may have added pumps after the video but you can see they weren’t there at the time the news crew shot the piece.

Regards,
mina