Author Topic: Is this what SM was doing?  (Read 7260 times)

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 96
  • "Help people enlighten to truth"
Re: Is this what SM was doing?
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2010, 13:59:34 pm »
I tend to see similarities in this circuit to the steam resonator where he uses exactly that kind of switching circuit. Could be again the vibration stuff, I am not sure.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Sr. member
  • ***
  • Posts: 457
Re: Is this what SM was doing?
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2010, 19:01:57 pm »
THANKS Dankie, I'm learning about H-bridge circuits as I sit here, maybe Haithar has something workable to share

Are we all to bow to Meyer around here or suffer the condescention?  sheezzzz
No sorry, it didn't work. Maybe the setup wasn't as perfect as it should have been, but the water wasn't changing. I was working with pure voltage only, no current except for the displacement currents and losses. You can read it on my member subforum.
My setup didn't have anything to do with a H bridge though and i can't think of a possible setup to make use of a H bridge.  ???

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Administrator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4557
    • water structure and science
Re: Is this what SM was doing?
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2010, 12:39:26 pm »
I tripped over this page tonight

http://www.hho-generator.de/en/hho-power-supply.htm

I'd like to build an electrical crossover switching circuit to add to my mess.

any ideas and help would be welcomed   < even a light push in the right direction, I am a quick study.. 

see image from the page

Hi KB,


What would be the theory about changing powersupply's in this case?
My 2 cents on what i see, is that the flow of electrons is still the same thru the water.....

Steve




Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 184
Re: Is this what SM was doing?
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2010, 01:08:44 am »
Steve,

nothing concrete, I wanted to investigate a hunch or at least prove to myself what happens when the polarity at the plates changes.

Even four solidstate relay pucks from ebay cheap would show me somehting that perhaps I hadn't seen before. 

I wonder how hard I could push it..  slow fire, rapid, timed? maybe a pause between the crossover action, who knows?

the idea of the whole thing acting as a positive charge collector (water and arcylic) with electrode pulses of the same polarity hitting opposite plates is interesting as well...  maybe there is a push or repellent effect at that point causing stress at the molecular level, that would change things up a  bit from the standard pulse routine

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 68
Re: Is this what SM was doing?
« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2010, 02:45:33 am »
Steve,

nothing concrete, I wanted to investigate a hunch or at least prove to myself what happens when the polarity at the plates changes.

Even four solidstate relay pucks from ebay cheap would show me somehting that perhaps I hadn't seen before. 

I wonder how hard I could push it..  slow fire, rapid, timed? maybe a pause between the crossover action, who knows?

the idea of the whole thing acting as a positive charge collector (water and arcylic) with electrode pulses of the same polarity hitting opposite plates is interesting as well...  maybe there is a push or repellent effect at that point causing stress at the molecular level, that would change things up a  bit from the standard pulse routine



Offline Login to see usernames

  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1019
Re: Is this what SM was doing?
« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2010, 03:28:37 am »
what im starting to see is when a positive pulse hits theres a negative polarity building in neg and there is postive in the postive right? well stans alternator version when it swings 180 out the negative side of secondary is still interacting with the negative and is making the negative swing back towards 0.. this change in polarity is a change in the direction of which positive polarity climbs... its  interacting with the positive choke too making its polarity fall toward 0 but the positive cant discharge due to the isolation diode so it may be swing toward 0 but the choke still maintains its charge until next pulse..   so i think to make this thing work with a regular transformer u simply might need to replicate this perspective... by hitting the bilf with ac but have the diodes makeing it where the positive choke doesnt release its charge...  when they are both swinging toward 0 this allows the electrons to head back towards the negative plate since the negative potential is changing toward 0 ... i can see how this perspective can oscillate the orbital electrons...

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 68
Re: Is this what SM was doing?
« Reply #14 on: January 28, 2010, 04:26:09 am »


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standing_wave_ratio

The most common case for measuring and examining SWR is when installing and tuning transmitting antennas. When a transmitter is connected to an antenna by a feed line, the impedance of the antenna and feed line must match exactly for maximum energy transfer from the feed line to the antenna to be possible. The impedance of the antenna varies based on many factors including: the antenna's natural resonance at the frequency being transmitted, the antenna's height above the ground, and the size of the conductors used to construct the antenna.[1]

When an antenna and feedline do not have matching impedances, some of the electrical energy cannot be transferred from the feedline to the antenna.[2] Energy not transferred to the antenna is reflected back towards the transmitter.[3] It is the interaction of these reflected waves with forward waves which causes standing wave patterns.[2] Reflected power has three main implications in radio transmitters: Radio Frequency (RF) energy losses increase, distortion on transmitter due to reflected power from load[2] and damage to the transmitter can occur.[4]

Matching the impedance of the antenna to the impedance of the feed line is typically done using an antenna tuner. The tuner can be installed between the transmitter and the feed line, or between the feed line and the antenna. Both installation methods will allow the transmitter to operate at a low SWR, however if the tuner is installed at the transmitter, the feed line between the tuner and the antenna will still operate with a high SWR, causing additional RF energy to be lost through the feedline.

Many amateur radio operators believe any impedance mismatch is a serious matter.[1] However, this is not the case. Assuming the mismatch is within the operating limits of the transmitter, the radio operator needs only be concerned with the power loss in the transmission line. Power loss will increase as the SWR increases, however the increases are often less than many radio amateurs might assume. For example, a dipole antenna tuned to operate at 3.75MHz—the center of the 80 meter amateur radio band—will exhibit an SWR of about 6:1 at the edges of the band. However, if the antenna is fed with 250 feet of RG-8A coax, the loss due to standing waves is only 2.2dB.[2] Feed line loss typically increases with frequency, so VHF and above antennas must be matched closely to the feedline. The same 6:1 mismatch to 250 feet of RG-8A coax would incur 10.8dB of loss at 146MHz.[2]

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 184
Re: Is this what SM was doing?
« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2010, 04:44:28 am »
"How to Tune a Standing Wave to a Plate Gap"

by Dankie

Franklin Key in a Jar Press
All Rights Reserved -
Published 2010