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vic voltage sync-pulse circuit

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outlawstc:
this circuit has bothered me for quiet sometime.. i have came up with good reasoning for it..
the inductor applied to center of secondary step up coil allows for more electrons to be sucked into the coil coming from 0volt ground..  my reasoning is that excess electrons is the only thing that will allow a neagative polarity... a diode is a deflection device allowing elctrons into the system but doesnt allow them to flow back out.. i think its induction and resistance should match secondary divided by 2

outlawstc

Dankie:
That drawing has confused me alot , would be great to see an answer from everybody here .

The secondary is a "bifilar coil" .... Strange. I believe the amp inhibiting coil is indeed center tapped on both wire stands of the secondary .  Its purpose is too have a "non-voltage shift"

Ground level in the water bath , no more isolated ground after the negative coil .



outlawstc:
The full-wave, center-tap rectifier
A much better scheme for changing ac to dc is to use both halves of the ac cycle. Suppose
you want to convert an ac wave to dc with positive polarity. Then you can allow the
positive half of the ac cycle to pass unchanged, and flip the negative portion of the wave
upside-down, making it positive instead. This is the principle behind full-wave
rectification.
One common full-wave circuit uses a transformer with a center-tapped secondary,
as shown in Fig. 21-5A. The center tap, a wire coming out of the exact middle of the secondary
winding, is connected to common ground. This produces out-of-phase waves at
the ends of the winding. These two waves can be individually half-wave rectified, cutting
off the negative half of the cycle. Because the waves are 180 degrees (half a cycle)
out of phase, the output of the circuit has positive pulses for both halves of the cycle
(Fig. 21-5B).
In this rectifier circuit, the average dc output voltage is about 90 percent of the rms
ac input voltage. The PIV across the diodes can be as much as 2.8 times the rms input
voltage. Therefore, the diodes should have a PIV rating of at least 4.2 times the rms ac
input.
Compare Fig. 21-5B with Fig. 20-1B . Can you see that the
waveform of the full-wave rectifier ought to be easier to smooth out? In addition to this
advantage, the full-wave, center-tap rectifier is kinder to the transformer and diodes
than a half-wave circuit. Furthermore, if a load is applied to the output of the full-wave
circuit, the voltage will drop much less than it would with a half-wave supply, because
the output has more “substance.”


outlawstc

outlawstc:
i beleave i have the answer to the sync pulse circuit..

during the positve pulse to positive choke it is hitting both positve and negative
during the negative cycle the secondary is ina dead short condition.. not taking on charge but falling to neutral because the diode is letting positve in from ground canceling its charge until it hits positve again

remember ground is neutral.. meaning it contains equal negative and positive charges

your ground allows only positive charges in.. during positve pulse it is gettin its positve energy from ground while the other negative half has the opourtunity to form a pulse as well..

i am makeing a video to explaing and show a visual image of what im mean..

outlawstc

Dankie:

--- Quote from: outlawstc on February 23, 2009, 19:49:36 pm ---i beleave i have the answer to the sync pulse circuit..

during the positve pulse to positive choke it is hitting both positve and negative
during the negative cycle the secondary is ina dead short condition.. not taking on charge but falling to neutral because the diode is letting positve in from ground canceling its charge until it hits positve again

remember ground is neutral.. meaning it contains equal negative and positive charges

your ground allows only positive charges in.. during positve pulse it is gettin its positve energy from ground while the other negative half has the opourtunity to form a pulse as well..

i am makeing a video to explaing and show a visual image of what im mean..

outlawstc

--- End quote ---

The story of this is that its frikkin illogical , the negative voltage amplitude tells tells that there is voltage going in opposite direction to another voltage @ the same time ,  just like absolutely perfect 12 volts battery concted + to and - to -  cancelling out eachother .

Lets say each choke was 100% identical and both signals 100% identical , I dont believe the amp inhibiting coil was needed , but since this is not physically possible we will need this coil to balance both and keep the middle tap @ 0 level



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