Author Topic: HHO "Quenching Tube" info  (Read 2438 times)

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HHO "Quenching Tube" info
« on: May 13, 2011, 04:40:27 am »
The tubing is known as Multi Lumen Tubing and can be custom made (extruded)
 
 The diameter we need to shoot for is .015" maximum per passage
 
 here is a link                 http://www.dukeextrusion.com/capabilities.html
 
 stan used this multipassage tubing to deliver the Hydroxy gases safely throughout the vehicle
 
 modern technology can produce a more capable delivery tube with better flow than his original as shown in the photo attached
 
 remember the compression fitting ferrule must squeeze down on the tubing and thats why his tubing was configured the way it was
 
 there should be a way maybe multiple tubings in parallel to get more gases to the desired location
 post your drawings or ideas here and any price quotes or contact info for other companies !

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Re: HHO "Quenching Tube" info
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2011, 01:30:57 am »
Very interesting,
 
The one question I would have is what kind of material was Meyer's tube made from?
I know he states in a video and the Tech Brief that the quenching discs are made from alumina ceramic.
Was the tube full of tiny alumina discs to make it flexible? Or was the entire tube the same material?

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Re: HHO "Quenching Tube" info
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2011, 03:05:16 am »
The tubing is known as Multi Lumen Tubing and can be custom made (extruded)
 
 The diameter we need to shoot for is .015" maximum per passage
 
 here is a link                 http://www.dukeextrusion.com/capabilities.html
 
 stan used this multipassage tubing to deliver the Hydroxy gases safely throughout the vehicle
 
 modern technology can produce a more capable delivery tube with better flow than his original as shown in the photo attached
 
 remember the compression fitting ferrule must squeeze down on the tubing and thats why his tubing was configured the way it was
 
 there should be a way maybe multiple tubings in parallel to get more gases to the desired location
 post your drawings or ideas here and any price quotes or contact info for other companies !

@Ali:

Very good idea!  There is a way to run these supply lines in parallel.  You connect the main supply line with multiple (Multi Lumen Tubing) quenching tubes via a manifold.   Then you can run as many lines as necessary until you achieve desired flow/volume. 

Regards,
mina
 

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Re: HHO "Quenching Tube" info
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2011, 22:21:08 pm »
Very interesting,
 
The one question I would have is what kind of material was Meyer's tube made from?
I know he states in a video and the Tech Brief that the quenching discs are made from alumina ceramic.
Was the tube full of tiny alumina discs to make it flexible? Or was the entire tube the same material?

The alumina ceramic disc is only used where a open flame is required, like in a stove for cooking , it has qualities that allow little or no heat retention and also the flame is pushed out away from the disc as it burns so the disc stays somewhat cool...a good material for a welding torch tip insert !

the tubing was some sort of plastic extruded... these guys can add various powdered materials to the plastic to improve flow ( less friction for liquid materials) but in our case the gasses simply need to be filtered at the entry of each tube

15 thousandths is a very small diameter and there were 7 passages times 5 groups... a total of 35 passages in a 3/8 inch dia tube


the reason they were grouped in a star configuration is so that when the ferrule was clamped down at the fitting the tube passages wouldnt collapse.