Author Topic: :)  (Read 2291 times)

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:)
« on: May 26, 2009, 04:56:06 am »
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Re: :)
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2009, 12:53:24 pm »
cool, what did you destroy to get that :)

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Re: :)
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2009, 14:32:23 pm »
It's a flyback out of a big old tv, looks mighty like a VIC doesn't it

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Re: :)
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2009, 17:22:44 pm »
Interesting. A very uncanny resemblance to the VIC. How old was the TV?

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Re: :)
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2009, 17:24:52 pm »
Hydro said it months ago, the VIC uses leakage inductance.
Dynodon said it months ago the VIC resembles a flyback.

The VIC has bobbin cavities... and separate bobbins. This does a few things, the duly noted theory is to increase distributed capacitance, we all see this, but there is also distributed inductance and as Stan shows the inductive coupling it might not be obvious unless you are looking for it, but this is designed to have poor coupling, meaning there is stray flux, leakage flux, throughout the space occupied by the Delrin bobbins. If you wanted a transformer with 'unity' coupling then you would wind the primary and secondary as closely and tightly as possible. That is not what stan is doing, he designed this transformer with LOTS of space in between the coils. There is not only leakage flux, but as we know, a series of capacitors formed by the bobbin sections. So effectively this is designed to store BOTH magnetic and electric fields / flux. Now with the leakage flux you can design it to limit current without losing energy, and the energy is sent back into the input. THIS IS THE MAGNETIC FIELD THAT STAN USES TO RESTRICT THE AMPS. you could do some simple math and figure it out, but at a guess the VIC is probably 70% Delrin and 30% wire by volume, which leaves plenty of room for the storage of magnetic flux which will perform the job of restricting amps and letting voltage take over.

IRT yaro, I do not know, it was a junk tv.

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Re: :)
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2009, 18:11:54 pm »
do you know the make of the TV?
maybe I can find one at city dump

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Re: :)
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2009, 18:49:02 pm »
No sorry, I was taking the engine out a ford f-150 with my father yesterday at a scrap yard and came across this large old tv, and quickly smashed it open with a hammer and cut the cords with visegrips to take out the circuit board that holds the flyback and another board that had some large heat sinks on it. Didn't have much time to get the rest and didn't want to take the whole thing home. I suggest finding older tvs, the older the higher quality and simpler the parts seem to be, and the bigger, the bigger the flyback transformer. Be careful of high voltages, but I assume after sitting out for several days the stored voltage will bleed off, otherwise be sure to ground the high voltage wire from the flyback that connects to the CRT before getting intimate.

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Re: :)
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2009, 19:08:09 pm »
lol ok thanks, gonna look for a huge wannabe-futuristic looking tv