Author Topic: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell  (Read 38353 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 270
Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #24 on: August 07, 2010, 04:53:21 am »
Now the idea is to build the cell as close as possible to Stan’s but since I’m missing information (such as the clipped on wire) I can only get so close to his.  Then I will be building his circuits (such as the VIC from his patents) and using them first simply as benchmarks.  When the initial stages of testing is completed, I don’t expect the results to far exceed that of the typical results achieved by most.  Keep in mind that I will only be using these results as benchmarks.

I can see that nobody knows (or wants to speculate on) what that wire was that was clipped onto the cell plate so I’ll leave that out until I get past my initial testing.  The other different components and combinations of components that I intend to implement will be experimented with at the conclusion of my initial testing.

Regards,
mina

mina, any materials that are used inside the cell has to be stainless steel and preferably all pieces need to be of the same grade. Even using two different grades of stainless steel in close proximity to each other can cause a galvanic corrosion effect. With my setup, I used stainless steel quilting clips which are very much like money clips but alot cheaper. I did not weld them or attach them to the outer electrode(anode) since they are simply pressure clips. It also allows for slight adjustments.
"Pals Binding Clips"
(http://www.clotilde.com/images/products/closeups/5366.jpg)
These little gems are cheap, easy to drill, bend or make just about any shape and still retain a good amount of spring to them for the non-solderable clip attachment much like how batteries click into things. You could weld them on too or even use silver epoxy.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 125
Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2010, 21:09:21 pm »
Hi everybody,

To everyone who is contributing to this thread, I must say that I am very impressed!  I thank you for your input.  I assure you that your investments (your knowledge, time and effort) are not being wasted and are not only appreciated, but they will also lead to better returns for everyone who can benefit from Stanley Meyer’s technology.  Your input allows us all to make a collective effort towards the goal of this thread.  Two minds are better than one but a thousand minds are better still! We will all reap the rewards of this concerted effort.  It’s sort of like having you all beside me in my shop assisting me ;D

@Steve:
If you could please post a link or a source where I might find this document where this third wire is mentioned, I will study this schematic for further clues.  Great input!
 
@Bubz:
I will be searching for a local source that I can purchase some of these clips from to experiment with.  They appear to be very useful for lots of different purposes.  Thank you.  By-the-way, I believe I did see the video that you made of your cell that was powered by an alternator.  I am also looking to purchase the same variable transformer and full wave bridge rectifier that you used in your setup.  Would you be able to point me in the right direction for locating these items as well?

@Everyone:
The results I will be posting during various stages of this build will be as follows:

•   Gas production in LPM per watt of input.
•   Temperature of the water bath at room temperature (in degrees Fahrenheit).
•   Temperature of the water bath after various increments of run time.
•   Cell capacitance (in microfarads).
•   Wave forms being generated (oscilloscope shots).
•   Cell pressure being developed in real time (PSI). 
•   Resistance across the cell in OHMs.
•   Voltage readings at key locations from within and outside of the cell.

If you would like to see other parameters posted in the testing phase, please feel free to suggest additional ones to be included.  I’ll do my best to disseminate these as well.
 
Anyone who would like to contribute to this thread but is reluctant for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER can private message me here at this site.  I will keep ALL private messages and their contents in strict confidence.

Regards,
mina
« Last Edit: August 08, 2010, 22:45:36 pm by mina »

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Administrator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4533
    • water structure and science
Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #26 on: August 07, 2010, 23:16:06 pm »
Mina,
 
Here is your third wire....
 
Page 178 of pdf reader in Stans waterfuelcell technical brief

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 125
Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #27 on: August 08, 2010, 07:15:11 am »
@Steve:
Yes, I believe you are correct!  If the line drawn from the plate gap area/zone was intended as a description or reference notation, it would have been drawn as a diagonal or slanted straight line, thus it is indeed a conductor path reference.

I noticed that the line has its own slanted reference line drawn from it in reference (for one) to “85” which is the water bath reference number used throughout the brief.

It also gives reference to a negative ground however this can not be a chassis ground.  It can not be the cell ground either (which in this case is an isolated ground) or it would simply be drawn to connect to the cell’s negative inner electrode.  I believe it connects to one side of the alternator’s field winding (primary winding) and possibly to the other side of the “amp inhibiting coil” as well located on this same drawing.

If this line of thinking is correct, then that would mean that the clip would have to be insulated on the side that clips to (makes contact with) the cell’s positive electrode to prevent it from conducting thus giving us a very good possible explanation for the mysterious third wire! 

Very nice find Steve!!!

Regards,
mina

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Administrator
  • Hero member
  • ****
  • Posts: 4533
    • water structure and science
Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #28 on: August 08, 2010, 10:13:30 am »
Your welcome!  ;)
 
 

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 61
Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #29 on: August 08, 2010, 15:57:50 pm »
The 0v marking on the primary winding should be marked as ground.

I'm pretty sure the 0v marking on the cell is connected to the water inlet(isolated from the cell's positive and negative plates or tubes).

That connection sets the incoming water to a neutral charge, referenced to the center tap of the resonant charging choke.

This will allow the neg and pos plates/tubes to pull equally on the water molecule since the waveform will be 180 degrees out of phase because of the water being referenced to the center tap.

Page 177 of the tech brief is the same setup using a center tapped transformer instead of an alternator.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 270
Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #30 on: August 08, 2010, 16:51:13 pm »
Oh! I see now! What you are referring to in this case is usually called a "Voltage Divider" in classical electrical terms. It's quite commonly found on computer power supplies, although the current ratings are different for each polarity. Take a look at the markings on the power supply and it will most times list the power ratings for each wire.

I had tested this design some years ago and found nothing out of the ordinary or any increase in efficiency. I believe it's just another way of doing it and it was listed to deter working around the patents. No secrets to reveal, no hidden treasures... Just another way to skin the cat. What I do like about this particular design is the fact that his secondaries are bifilar. It's as if the chokes and secondaries are the same. Is there any other inventions or devices in the world that utilize a bifilar secondary? I have never seen one yet except in Stan's drawings.

Offline Login to see usernames

  • 50+
  • *
  • Posts: 61
Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #31 on: August 08, 2010, 18:10:35 pm »
Oh! I see now! What you are referring to in this case is usually called a "Voltage Divider" in classical electrical terms. It's quite commonly found on computer power supplies, although the current ratings are different for each polarity. Take a look at the markings on the power supply and it will most times list the power ratings for each wire.
Close.

A voltage divider is a network of resistors. 
In this case it's just a tap off the secondary of a transformer.  Center tap in this case.  To get different voltages, the tap is placed wherever the ratio of windings give the desired outputs.
 
I had tested this design some years ago and found nothing out of the ordinary or any increase in efficiency. I believe it's just another way of doing it and it was listed to deter working around the patents. No secrets to reveal, no hidden treasures... Just another way to skin the cat. What I do like about this particular design is the fact that his secondaries are bifilar. It's as if the chokes and secondaries are the same. Is there any other inventions or devices in the world that utilize a bifilar secondary? I have never seen one yet except in Stan's drawings.

In 24 yrs of work experience with electronics, the only time I have seen a bifilar secondary is on a very small RF toroid.

The most intriguing aspect of Meyer's technology is voltage with no current, and that is the basis for his method.  Otherwise current flows and it's everyday electrolysis.

The only K.I.S.S method that I know of to do this is a parallel LC circuit, and imagine that, it's right there with the bifilar coil. 
There is capacitance between the pair of wires that make up the choke.  That is the major reason for him writing spiral wrapped, to keep the capacitance consistent.

Twisting the wire also raises the capacitance, I've tested it with a pair of 10ft length 36AWG magnet wires.  The capacitance went from 186pf/10ft untwisted(held tightly  together with thread wrapped around both wires), to 272pf/10ft with the wires twisted together at about 5 turns/inch.  Same 2 wires each test.

Anyway, hope this helps and Mena doesn't think this is cluttering up the thread.

Mike