Author Topic: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell  (Read 38259 times)

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Welcome spectators and skeptics alike.  Please have a chair and get comfortable as this thread should be fun if it stays on course.  In order to foster this type of atmosphere and objective, please read the following guidelines in their entirety:

·   Please follow this general set of ground rules which only pertains to this particular thread before posting ANYTHING.
·   Please do not post in this thread if you have nothing to contribute.
·   Please do not use any derogative or otherwise defamatory remarks towards anyone posting in this thread.
·   Please stay on topic.

Now that we have that out of the way, let me begin by explaining the nature of the project being showcased in this thread. 
 
This thread is dedicated to Stanley Meyer’s demo fuel cell. The same one he used to convince the reluctant United States Patent and Trademark Office that his technology was actually legitimate. It was largely because of this demo cell that the USPTO finally granted Meyer his patent(s).
« Last Edit: July 31, 2010, 08:11:15 am by mina »

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2010, 16:38:47 pm »
The reason I am making this my first project on this forum is because I believe this device (the tubular array demonstration water fuel cell or whatever you choose to call it) to be crucial in laying down a solid foundation concerning the discoveries of Stanley Meyer. If we don’t understand exactly how this device operates and how to build it, then there is really no need to dabble into more advanced concepts and related devices as this, in my humble opinion, would become just another classic example of putting the cart before the horse.
 
I believe you must be able to crawl before you can walk. Walk before you can run and run before you can fly. Until we are able to produce copious amounts of hydroxy gas, there is no need to start talking about water injectors, gas processors, plasma spark plugs or fitting our devices to internal combustion engines. This is a journey back to the basics of Stanley Meyer.
 
I’ve watched many other threads that attempted to tackle the demo cell in the past here and on other forums only to become convoluted and hijacked by experimenters trying to steer the direction of these threads away from their original purpose. I’m trying to avoid this happening in this one.
 
Let us now begin to crawl.

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2010, 17:59:21 pm »
I agree with you, that is why I started with the early systems, and studied the alternator and drew the connections between it and the VIC coil, and worked my way into a better understanding. The early systems are important to learn from. A nice demo cell will always be a nice demo cell to use for demonstrations after you have progressed.


(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v81/bigbuba/Picture38-2.png)



However, looking back now, after all the work I've done. I think a Variable Spacing Plate Cell would be more useful than a Tubular Array Cell. This is because you will be able to vary the capacitance over a large range and experiment with various coils and VICs.


Also, many have built nice tubular arrays, and failed because they didn't understand the requirements of the Control and Driver Circuit, and the VIC. The cell is ONLY one part.








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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2010, 18:48:03 pm »
Please allow me to go over some of the specific objectives of this thread. The goal of this thread is to explain how to build Meyer’s demonstration water fuel cell step by step in detail. When we are finished building the cell correctly, we will be generating copious amounts of hydroxy gas in the same manner that Stanley did. In order for our objectives to be met, our resulting water fuel cell must:
 
·   Produce hydroxy gasses well in excess of Faraday’s Law regarding input power/gas production.
·   Remain cool to the touch without excess heat after running for hours.
·   Be as simplistic as possible to build and replicate.
·   Remain ELECTROLYTE and ADDITIVE FREE.
   
In preparation for this project, I have ordered materials to begin this build well in advance of starting this thread. I have also constructed a customized lab which is a stand alone structure that is 12 feet wide by 20 feet long and is 11 feet tall from the ground up. It has a 70AMP, 240 volt service complete with overhead fluorescent lighting inside. For anyone who is interested in building such a structure of their own, I will be starting an additional thread complete with plans and assistance at a later date located in my projects section.
 
This thread will be the first time that I have ever allowed anyone (besides my close friends and family) to look inside my lab and see my setup. I will be posting many color photos of my water fuel cell build as we go.
 
I have spent thousands of dollars of my own money and countless hours pouring over hundreds of postings to get to where I am at currently. I know many of you on this site have done the same if not much, much more. I only mention these facts to you in order to convey the seriousness and determination of my efforts here. Please understand that this undertaking is NOT all about me and it’s not all about being clever. It’s about our planet. It’s about our neighbors. It’s about our children. It's about making a change before it's too late. It’s about the future generations who will inherit what we leave behind.
 
Regards,
mina

    
« Last Edit: August 01, 2010, 01:51:11 am by mina »

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2010, 18:58:24 pm »
Sounds Good, If you wish I can provide insight and drawings for how I replicated the construction of Stan's Demo Cell.


I'm just pointing out the most beautiful cell in the world is just a paper weight if you don't put the same focus and energy and money into the VIC and the Control and Driver Circuits.

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2010, 23:15:23 pm »
Sounds Good, If you wish I can provide insight and drawings for how I replicated the construction of Stan's Demo Cell.


I'm just pointing out the most beautiful cell in the world is just a paper weight if you don't put the same focus and energy and money into the VIC and the Control and Driver Circuits.

Hi Donald,
 
Yes, I would like that very much if you would post drawings on the tubal array as well as insight into construction tips in order to save time and effort in building the cell.  I respect your work and input very much as you have been a very instrumental person and key voice on this site.  Your help is deeply appreciated.
 
Anyone else who also has additional insight, experience and may have even worked with Meyer himself is also invited to share their input and expertise too.  It can only benefit the viewers of this thread and its objectives in doing so.
 
And to the rest of those reading and following this thread; feel free to ask questions.  ANY questions.  I will try to answer them to the best of my ability.  When I can not (or if I am mistaken), I’m confident that someone else more knowledgeable than I with Meyer’s demo cell will step in and address your inquiries.  You will not be slammed for your questions no matter how silly they may seem to you.  Here’s your chance to learn, share and participate. 
 
For those of you who have very little tolerance for the ignorant; I ask you to please show some restraint.  Please remember that you were one of these people at one time in your development that used to ask these very same types of questions. 

I’m confident we can all get to the finish line and complete this project.  The key is getting there together.



Sincerely,
mina
« Last Edit: August 01, 2010, 00:16:24 am by mina »

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The Reactor Assembly - The Demo Cell
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2010, 00:55:54 am »
The reactor assembly is where we might as well begin.  I have right in front of me the stainless steel tubes that I have purchased from a vendor by the name of McMaster-Carr.  The outer tubes are 0.75” in outer diameter and their wall thickness is 0.035”.  The type of stainless steel is type 304 and is seamless.  My cost was about $140.00 USD.  You could probably find a less expensive source if you shop around.  I have yet to cut the tubes to size but to the best of my knowledge, they should be 18” in length, but I am getting ready to cut them each 24” long in order to make a tab extending from the bottom that I can form into an upside down numeral “7” shape as Meyer did.
 
If these dimensions are off, feel free to say so but the drawings I have from Meyer’s patent appear to be typos.
The reactor housing I am making is constructed of cast acrylic tubing.  The tube is 6” in outer diameter and 5.5” inner diameter making it .25” wall thickness.  It is 36” in length however I believe Meyer’s housing was only 24” long.  The tube cost me about $120.00 USD from McMaster-Carr.  Again, not the cheapest source but simply more convenient for me logistically.   

I am using a longer/taller reactor housing in order to use the extra space at the top as additional hydroxy storage to act as a buffer for gas production later on.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2010, 01:58:31 am by mina »

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Re: Starting at the Genesis of Stanley Meyer's Work - The Demo Cell
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2010, 01:15:25 am »
The outer tubes were 18 inches long and inner tubes 19 inches long. My best guess is the acrylic tube was about 30 inches tall.


The mounting tabs were welded on, not formed from the tube, that method will cause you some trouble.


If you are going to drill and tap the acrylic tube to bolt on the end pieces then you would want a thicker acrylic wall, 1/4 wall will likely crack and ruin the tube.


Here is a quick drawing of the base, the main idea is to align the tubes perfectly, and sealed without leaks