Author Topic: VIC controller  (Read 20897 times)

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2010, 17:28:20 pm »
This whole circuit was made up of two seperate units.The one I posted earlier of the scanning cards is one panel.It was mounted in the right rear corner of the buggy by the engine.The other one is the GMS controller that was mounted on the dash panel by the windshield.

I will try to locate the pics for these two units and add them here.

Thats it for now
Don

Hey Don, are this pictures different from the ones you already posted?

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2010, 22:23:42 pm »
I don't have a picture of that panel,but I think It is in my first videos or it's in a news letter.Maybe in one of Stans videos,the one where he puts a tape in the vcr before starting his lecture.
Don

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2010, 22:27:08 pm »
I spent a little bit of time looking into how to make a frequency sweep

what i gathered is you can use a saw tooth wave, into a VCO, voltage controlled oscillator, to make the frequency change, does anyone have experience with this? there must be other ways to do it too...

it will be a keep part of making this circuit to do the scanning

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2010, 22:53:16 pm »
Hey Donald,
Here's a PDF file that explains the 4046 PLL IC in really good detail...it should be very useful http://www.globalkast.com/docs/4046_PLL_Chip_With_Voltage_Control.pdf

Also on the pickup coil circuit, the one i made is set to activate once it senses 1kv or more at the cell, this voltage range can be changed by changing the resistor values or # of pickup coil turns.

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2011, 19:34:27 pm »
I use this schematic for my VIC PLL controller, only needs a gate pulser attached.
Has a transistor driver, but I am using a MOSFET driver now. See my thread.

R1 R2 connected at 4046 chip regulates the resonance frequency bandwidth I use trimmers for all resistors.
UP DOWN is a sawtooth generator for scanner. The lock-in circuit is off chip. PHILIPS had a chip with lock-in build in. When locked-in the chip switches are flipped to hold the signal into the PLL.

Open for discussion....

br,
webmug

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2011, 13:09:38 pm »
I use this schematic for my VIC PLL controller, only needs a gate pulser attached.
Has a transistor driver, but I am using a MOSFET driver now. See my thread.

R1 R2 connected at 4046 chip regulates the resonance frequency bandwidth I use trimmers for all resistors.
UP DOWN is a sawtooth generator for scanner. The lock-in circuit is off chip. PHILIPS had a chip with lock-in build in. When locked-in the chip switches are flipped to hold the signal into the PLL.

Open for discussion....

br,
webmug


Looks great, Webmug!
Have you tested it already?

Steve

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2011, 13:52:56 pm »
I use this schematic for my VIC PLL controller, only needs a gate pulser attached.
Has a transistor driver, but I am using a MOSFET driver now. See my thread.

R1 R2 connected at 4046 chip regulates the resonance frequency bandwidth I use trimmers for all resistors.
UP DOWN is a sawtooth generator for scanner. The lock-in circuit is off chip. PHILIPS had a chip with lock-in build in. When locked-in the chip switches are flipped to hold the signal into the PLL.

Open for discussion....

br,
webmug


Looks great, Webmug!
Have you tested it already?

Steve
Yes, I have tested parts of the circuit I build shown in the pdf.

-Triangle (sawtooth) generator for PLL VCO
-PLL pulse generator and filter part
-pickup coil circuit pulse converter for input PLL
-TTL chip switches for switching scanner to filter part control

Now the main part are the VIC coils, core and MOSFET configurations 8)
Thing is when the coils PRIM and SEC are connected the PLL PULSE frequency must be altered for resonance from the PLL PULSE.
To do this a capacitor C1 C2 is replaced. When the chokes and cell are added the resonance frequency is changed so capacitor has to be altered too (when out of bandwidth R1=fmin R2=fmax) Testing resonance is the tricky part, core and coil size is variable. Takes a lot of time to test this.

All help is appreciated!

br,
Webmug

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Re: VIC controller
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2011, 11:25:12 am »
I just saw now, your interesting threads in here, Don. Thank you very much for them.
To clarify about the + and - voltages. In the present view of physics, there's absolutely no difference if you plug +1000V at one electrode and -1000V at the other, or if you plug +2000V at one electrode and "earth" at the other. Why? Because there doesn't exist an absolute potential level. Only differences in potential are seen (electric fields). An example. If you just go up in the air by 3 feet the potential will usually increase by about 200 Volts! So you see, there's no absolute potential. Even the "earth" potential is different in different locations.
But and here now comes the difference. The water itself also has a potential relative to the environment. E.g. if you take a glass of water and stick a HV DC wire in it, it will for a short while make some sparks until the water has charged to a certain level. One usually says, it has become electrostatically charged. Strictly speaking it's a one terminal capacitor to the environment. If you now stick your finger in the water you will get a small spark, like when you walked on the carpet and then touch a doorknob (the same principle).
So if applying +1000V and -1000V does make a difference in the cell, compared to +2000V and "earth", then only because the water itself had a certain potential relative to them before.
So in this view, it could actually make a difference if you apply +1000/-1000V.


In this relation it is IMHO important to know, that a tubular WFC, like Stan used, does behave differently in relation to charges than 2 plates. Why? Because of the "faraday-cup" effect (inside a conductor the E-Field is zero). This means, if the water has any charge in relation to it's environment, it will give this charge to the outer cylinder and become neutral. This could be the reason, why the outer tube has to be isolated in Delrin. Otherwise it would again give it's charge back to the water around it...


Maybe this could be important. Maybe not...


Ah BTW:

If the upper fact is important, then it would be quite important, that you go again in the inside of the inner tube, before the water (gas) goes out of the tube, and have a delrin cap on top.  If you do it like that, the outflow always becomes neutralized before leaving the WFC.
The same for the input plug for the water to the WFC...

 
« Last Edit: February 28, 2011, 13:16:21 pm by Kali_ma_Amar »