Author Topic: My thoughts on the Meyers effect  (Read 15115 times)

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Re: My thoughts on the Meyers effect
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2010, 22:27:11 pm »
I don't know exactly how the voltmeters measure it.

But if you dig a hole 1000 feet deep, and then put a 1000 foot ladder in it from the bottom up, the ladder will be zero feet above the ground.

By using -1000 as your REFERENCE, and then adding 1000 to it, you will come up with zero.

If the voltmeter calculates the absolute difference, then good for it. I don't know what the voltmeter will measure.

The point is, the water fuel cell needs -voltage and +voltage that are pulsed equally, and if you do this, then you do it right.

If you try zero and +voltage then you do it wrong

It doesn't really matter how you measure it, this is all about understanding the operation so you can build it with the correct goal.

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Re: My thoughts on the Meyers effect
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2010, 22:50:42 pm »
Hi Donald,

I like your usage of a hole 1000 feet but you didn't complete it.  Add another ladder above that 1000 feet then you have a complete picture.  Anyway you look at it with reference to ground up the ladder is plus 1000 feet and down the ladder is minus 1000 feet.  Plus and minus voltage that I've seen referenced to are with respect to ac electric systems where voltage oscillates back and forth like an inverter circuit one switch opens then closes then another switch opens back and forth.  It has to do with excess electrons on one side and depletion of electrons on the other side with respect to ground which is neutral i.e. atoms with neutral charge and/or equal numbers more or less of ions and free electrons.  If plates or tubes are switching plus and minus back and forth that's like the steam resonator.  If there's an excess of electrons on one plate or tube and a depletion of electrons on another with respect to ground (in this case water) then I think that's it.  That's my understanding anyway.  Don is right I think you gotta pull the electrons out of the water.  For as long as the switch to positive is closed, switch to ground (with respect to the circuit) many times.  I think that's what Stan was doing.

Regards,
Andy

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Re: My thoughts on the Meyers effect
« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2010, 11:09:29 am »
I don't know exactly how the voltmeters measure it.

But if you dig a hole 1000 feet deep, and then put a 1000 foot ladder in it from the bottom up, the ladder will be zero feet above the ground.

By using -1000 as your REFERENCE, and then adding 1000 to it, you will come up with zero.

If the voltmeter calculates the absolute difference, then good for it. I don't know what the voltmeter will measure.

The point is, the water fuel cell needs -voltage and +voltage that are pulsed equally, and if you do this, then you do it right.

If you try zero and +voltage then you do it wrong

It doesn't really matter how you measure it, this is all about understanding the operation so you can build it with the correct goal.
Voltmeters only have two connections. One part is the reference (which is always 0V) the other connection is measuring the difference to the reference value. The -1000V is not a fixed value, only when you measure it against ground.
To use your analogy, if you have a 1000 feet deep hole, then the multimeter on the bottom of the whole would not know how deep it is, it would assume this place as the zero mark. Add the first (-1000feet) and you are at ground level (0 feet for us), add the 1000 feet ladder and you have 2000feet height for the multimeter. The ladder would not be in the hole of course.

You can use a meter with three connections where one is ground to see +1000V/-1000V but it makes no difference. The forces will be the same in magnitude. One side is positive (ground for example), the other side is negative (-2000V).

Dynodon, feel free to remove this posts or move them to another topic if they disturb the thread.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2010, 11:41:46 am by haithar »

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Re: My thoughts on the Meyers effect
« Reply #19 on: January 08, 2010, 15:45:52 pm »
I have been wondering about the readings from a volt meter myself.I have a 12 volt center tap transformer that I have tested.If you read either leg in refference to the center tap,it will indeed read the positive or negative value like everyone knows, at half the voltage,6 volts.But if you read across both legs only and not through the center tap, you get 12 volts.Now this is do to the fact that the secondary when read across the two legs acts just like a transformer without a center tap.This is do to the secondary being just one continuous wire with a point in the middle that has a connection for the center tap.So it's not reading a negative value because the normal negative leg is no longer negative.
My thoughts are that maybe some how if we could use the center tap as a refference and use both the positive and negative, it may help with our oppisite voltage zones.
Don

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Re: My thoughts on the Meyers effect
« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2010, 18:35:33 pm »
My cell is pretty basic.All I did was drill three counter sunk holes down into the base material.The center hole is 1/2 in dia. and is drilled the deepest.Then the 3/4 inch hole is next,but it's not as deep as the 1/2 inch.Then the last whole is an inch just deep enough to hold the outer tube case that you see.Then I drilled a hole from the outside so it will cut into the base where the 3/4 inch tube ends.That's the pipe plug you see in the picture.If you open the picture file,you'll be able to see the whole that is drilled down through the top beside the tube case,this cuts into the hole that was drilled through to the tube set.That is how the water gets into the tubes from the bottom.If you hook this cell up to straight DC power,you can see the water circulating.
Don
Don, I m trying to visualize the resonant cavity design. Are the positive rod and the cylinder fixed in the base where water is going into to cavity? The base is fixed with a cap on top? Cap see picture...

br,
webmug

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Re: My thoughts on the Meyers effect
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2010, 00:17:05 am »
Webmug here's a drawing to get the idea across.There was a cap that slid down over the top of both tubes.The inside tube is longer just like Stans drawing and mine beside it.Just picture the outside tube over the inside just like they are aliagned as drawn.
Don

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Re: My thoughts on the Meyers effect
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2010, 16:28:28 pm »
My last post was only meant to give everyone the basic concept of how Stan was using voltage potential to PULL the water molecule apart.Most people don't fully understand what it was he was doing.Basic attraction/repelling forces of voltage.

I will delete previous post that I feel don't follow my path of documenting my thoughts and work.So don't be affended when your post are removed.I will leave them for a while before deleting them.

Now I will go into the basic resonance cell design needed that Stan used.
This type of cell I did get to see.The file at the end of this post shows where Stan states all of this.

The resonance cell is only one set of tubes.3/4 inch ouside with a 1/2 inch inside tube, 3 inches long.Spacing was .090 inches.Stainless of course.

Now for the big surprise. The  tube set must be encased in delrin. Just the outside tube is covered. But the inside tube will be also isolated from the water bath because the whole set will be in a base that holds both tubes.I will attach a photo also to this post of my tube set,so you will get the idea.

This is in Stans tech brief that is at the bottom of this post.I have not seen anyone do this to their cell.

Now the cell I seen of Stans had 11 tube sets in it.They were all controlled be seperate VIC circuits.Each one was independent of the others.That is whats inside the white cell pictured at the beginning of the gas injector brief.

Again,this is only a disciption,and not meant to go into details of how it works.Those thoughts will follow in other post.
Well, the cavity construction is clever, because when the cavity is in resonance with the water molecules it generates high velocity gas stream through the small gap on top of the cavity due wave guide method.
(water molecules are smashed between voltage zones and water molecules, till they are pulled apart, that's how high velocities are reached)
If we want to control the gas burn rate, Stan adjusted the gas output port gap size and gas production rate by means of voltage amplitude/pulsing/gating frequency...

br,
webmug

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Re: My thoughts on the Meyers effect
« Reply #23 on: April 06, 2011, 15:56:07 pm »
hey Don,
sorry this post is so late i've just read through the topic.
any way this has to do with your secound or third post.
 
 "Now why does it need to be that way? Think about it.If you are to pull the water molecule apart,you need to apply the pulling force to both sides of the molecule at the same time and of the same force.If you have a voltage differential of 1000 volts,where as you would read with a volt meter,you have a +1000 volts on the positive plate and 0 volts on the ground.Now what's going to happen? You'll just pull the molecule toward the positive plate.Because you don't have an opposite force pulling back toward the negitve plate.The pulling force need to work from both sides at the same time of the same force"
 
If we only had voltage on the possitive side and 0 volts on the negative. the atoms would not be simply atrracted to one side, it would attract all the electrons and replel the protons which would be everything else, so it seems to me that it would do the same thing as having voltage on both sides. Not that this is what Stan did but its just my thoughts on the subject.