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Sebosfato / Re: Capacitors work like magnets?
« Last post by Hidden on August 14, 2017, 18:04:23 pm »
I guess what i was trying to say is that a magnet needs a closed circuit to increase the field force

so a capacitor too would have a force aplied into a electrostatic medium amplified in comparison with the capacitors without a closed circuit

the difference is that capacitors discharge thru this path so energy is consumed but the fields are there anyway

the higher the resistance the lower will be the current closing the circuit so a very high resistance would allow the fields to get strong but the discharge rate will also be very small consuming small power
 
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Sebosfato / Capacitors work like magnets?
« Last post by Hidden on August 11, 2017, 08:57:51 am »
Hello guys I was trying to work over Meyer  theories and tried to address the fact that he tells that he uses energy and uses potential  energy too

Well I know the electric field ouside a capacitor is essentially zero although as Meyer said it consumed energy is started to wonder what if we charge the capacitor but discharge it at a small rate just to let the electric field get transmitted just like iron transmit a magnetic field:

I found from that reasoning that a resistor will always try to zero the potential in a circuit loop balancing with a current flow... but basically there is always going to be a loss so the capacitor is always discharging thru a resistor for keeping the force directed to the water.

Meyers says the secret suppose to be restrict the amps and allow the voltage to make work in a dead short condition

Well the higher is the capacitance and higher the voltage the greater will be the electric force a capacitor will have

So The idea is two capacitors connected in series between them being in parallel with the water cell so each can be charged with high voltage

The cell must have a dielectric barrier to allow the electrodes to charge to high voltage and each electrode must be in a different chemical environment the positive at the basic side and negative at the acid side... the dielectric and the electrode must be stable on both environments

The higher is the dielectric strength and constant the greater will be charge involved and therefore reaction products

The main idea consists in exceeding the covalent force of water such that the molecule will be rearranged accordingly with current flow on resonance and since the resonance is betweeen charged capacitors the voltage on the capacitors oscillate 180 dregrees apart so it should not consume power in a conventional manner

The system must be charged tô enough high voltage and the resonance must develop enough current to get reaction products

Water capacitance and the input capacitors must be balanced to maximize resonance
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Steve / Re: My Horvath replication project by Steve
« Last post by Hidden on August 10, 2017, 17:29:25 pm »
When we add water to the koh it get extremely hot, I was wandering if this heat could be useful on splitting the molecules.

I imagine a way to add water to a koh solid having electrodes arranged to pass a current thru it

Unfortunately it's not too much as to be more than required for the reaction to be spontaneous...
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Steve / Re: My Horvath replication project by Steve
« Last post by Hidden on August 09, 2017, 23:42:04 pm »
When we add water to the koh solid flakes what happen?

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Steve / Re: My Horvath replication project by Steve
« Last post by Hidden on August 09, 2017, 15:07:06 pm »
I believe you are on the right track Steve! Basically koh disrupt the equilibrium of the molecules giving up one electron to the water molecules and remaining as a positive potassium ion equally distributed over the solution. The result as you say is molecules that are not the classical they will have much less attraction between the hydrogen and oxygen since the last have 9 electrons and share one electron with a hydrogen molecule...  for its not only partially sharing this 9th electron the one forming the oh ion will be much less strongly glued
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Steve / Re: My Horvath replication project by Steve
« Last post by Hidden on July 28, 2017, 12:09:38 pm »
Why KOH|?

A base is a substance that accepts hydrogen ions. When a base is dissolved in water, the balance between hydrogen ions and hydroxide ions shifts the opposite way. Because the base "soaks up" hydrogen ions, the result is a solution with more hydroxide ions than hydrogen ions. This kind of solution is alkaline.

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J. Miller / Re: Stanley Meyer Environmental Tape "Full" released!
« Last post by Hidden on July 19, 2017, 20:38:17 pm »
??????
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Sebosfato / Re: Electrode resisitivity
« Last post by Hidden on July 17, 2017, 04:51:52 am »
That kind of voltage distribution might be advantageous when using the lengthwise resonance. Or even accelerating ions.

It's doubtful that rod resistance would be suitable for use as the choke's current limiting resister.  That resistance slows the choke capacitor's discharge to 20 percent remaining by the next charging pulse.  Each pulse from the choke will then be 20 percent higher than its prior pulse.  So the value of the choke resister must be carefully calculated, or determined experimentally.
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J. Miller / Re: Stanley Meyer Environmental Tape "Full" released!
« Last post by Hidden on July 14, 2017, 22:20:45 pm »








I saw that this tape was posted by dan donatelli on russ gries' site!
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Sebosfato / Electrode resisitivity
« Last post by Hidden on July 10, 2017, 20:25:58 pm »
Hello I just thought about the resistivity of our electrode and how it will influence the electric force and current distribution at the cell

Check the drawing

Basically having a long electrode and applying the power at one side only will cause a voltage drop over its length... if we get a second electrode where the ground is applied

Now having a third electrode would cause the resistive electrode to cause a second current to flow

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