Author Topic: Aussepom goes magnetic  (Read 18555 times)

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2010, 04:18:03 am »
Hi there
                  While many of dive into the wonders of the magnetic motor and or alternator, I also as you see have been travelling down that path. I have been looking into why some have not got any further than a demonstration model, or doing what Bedini is doing, making money from ‘demonstration’, or experimental machines.
The calling of his machines by a particular name, in my opinion gets him around a number of laws that are in many countries, prohibiting the claim of ‘perpetual motion machines’ the US is one of them. The US company that set up over here CME the ‘Cycclone motor’ made some terrible mistakes with the Australian laws, that was the main reason for forcing them into liquidation. Not having a Australian Financial Services Licence, was one of the main things, and unregistered company was another. Here in Australia while it is not against the law to claim perpetual motion, proving that you can do it is another thing.   
My unit while it would I hope have enough the cover the power used in the ‘assisted pulsed’ power for the unit, will have enough power to drive a separate alternator that will have enough output to recharge the battery bank that would supply all the power for the load and for the mag system.
Just some thoughts.
aussepom   

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #17 on: February 16, 2010, 06:07:16 am »
I wouldn't consider a permanent magnet motor a perpetual motion machine anyway, the magnets will only last 100 years...

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2010, 06:48:48 am »
Hi there yes I agree but,
                  There is an argument that seems is not used with the sceptics, A coil is a storage device, of energy, and as is a capacitor, all man made, capacitors many years ago it was thought that a 1 farad capacitor would be so large that it could or would be to big to be practical, now they are used in computers in place of batteries.
Magnets have been around for eons, they to are a storage device, a storage of magnetic energy,  and as the years have go by these too have got better and stronger, they will ‘wear out’, loose there magnetism, high heat will affect them. So why do not the ‘normal’ engineers see this, if magnets can be arranged to give us motion, it may seem to be ‘perpetual motion’ but it is not, eventually it will loose it’s ‘stored magnetism’, just like the soft iron core of a coil will. I know that I may be preaching to the already converted.     
Just some thoughts.
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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #19 on: February 16, 2010, 06:53:50 am »
Hi again
                  some info that I can tell you at the moment, it will have 116, magnets, and 48 coils, I will not know any more until i have done some tests on the setup.
aussepom

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2010, 07:40:38 am »
Cool, can't wait to hear about your results.

I would rather tell people... it's powered by the magnets, if you start saying perpetual motion and free energy then you'll just get more headaches than you need, it would be fair enough to say "i'm extracting energy from the magnets...", because if you say free energy then a bunch of bafoons are going to jump down your throat...

it may be free energy... but hey, magnets are expensive! say you have 116 magnets and depending on what size... say $10 each, then you have over $1000 of magnets, so to get $1000 of electricity you need 10,000 kWh (at 10 cents/ kWh) ... or you'd need to power your house for about 10 years to pay it off...


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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2010, 10:03:34 am »
Hi DonaldWfc

                             I do not think that it would work on $10 mags, here in Australia that would be around $A20, list for these is $A64, but when you buy more the price drops dramatically.  I have to buy two slabs of alum, 1200x1200mm one at 40mm and the other at 6mm, so you see this is not some toy, it is a commercial project, if my tests work out. This is why I will not be able to explain the really nitty gritty stuff, if the 'client' goes for the design after tests and I am happy, then I will as you may understand have to keep quiet about most of it, but it does not stop me from telling you of the progress and giving out hints.
I hope you will understand. To me it is a magnet motor/alternator I will not be claiming perpetual motion. The biggest worry of my design at the moment is stopping it I have several option because of the design, I will know better when I get the sample coils wound.
There is a limit to the size that you can go to, in my own opinion, mostly a practical one.
I think that the maximum that I would be able to get to would be around the 25kw, at 240v that’s 104amps, or at 110v a wopping 227amps. To me this  could be the max, but if there was an extra mag unit on it, then it could possible go higher.  For me the 12 to 16kW unit is about the right size to market. May be a 6kW unit as well
Who know I may bomb out like the rest, but I do not work on any thing that does not have at least an 80% chance of working, that is why pre testing is important.
aussepom


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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #22 on: February 16, 2010, 14:35:41 pm »
Nice, do you have a target price for your device once it is finished?

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Re: Aussepom goes magnetic
« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2010, 00:54:24 am »
Hi Donaldwfc
                          No not as yet, as you will understand if things go ok, the a production unit would be a lot lower price than the prototype. how ever the material cost may not get much cheaper, you can only get so much off the price of a slab of alum, and again the magnet the same deal, the  control systems would be lower.
even so if for a fully reliable unit in the 6,12,25kW it would be worth it, and there is a plan for the car, it would be a maggenset provining power to a set of batteries, but you would only be looking at around a 48v sytem, and you would not need a masive amper/hour ones either, drive iwould be all wheel disk.drum motors on each wheel, so the cars that already have this would be easily converted, but that is along way down the track. first we have to tackle the power companies.
aussepom