Author Topic: Alternator setup  (Read 4464 times)

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Alternator setup
« on: April 17, 2009, 18:44:55 pm »
Hi everyone,

I like to share my alternator setup which is a work in progress but has some results.

The screenshot below shows a 55Amps alternator and a washing machine motor specs: 220V/3Amps (max 2750rpms) an oldie.

(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=995.0;attach=3737;image)

I have a problem with the pulley ratio because I cannot get the thing of the motor, is there anyone who knows how to get it off?

(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=995.0;attach=3739;image)

Below is the setup wired, because the alternator has a Delta connection, changed it to a Wye connection, removed the internal regulator and pulled out the rectifier bridge.

(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=995.0;attach=3741;image)

Below the setup complete with scope, power source and Lawton circuit connected.

(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=995.0;attach=3743;image)

Below screenshot shows the used schematic pulsed with the Lawton circuit, currently only one tube is used.

(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=995.0;attach=3745;image)

When running we can adjust the gating signal to form the shown waveforms, don’t know if its good but it’s producing some stuff.

(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=995.0;attach=3747;image)

Also here is a video and picture of the results with 0.5Amps 12,6Volts onto the rotor and the motor running on 200Volts. Don’t know the Amps yet, still need an amp meter.
I used rain water, so I don't get the brown yellow stuff fast.

http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=995.0;attach=3750

(http://www.ionizationx.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=995.0;attach=3749;image)

The motor I’m currently using is getting hot and is to weak for the harmonics setup and needs a larger pulley to get to it higher.

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Re: Alternator setup
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2009, 19:47:02 pm »
that waveform just looks how it should look! where do you measure the blue line? at the tube?

on picture IMG2315.JPG, is the box a transformer? are the two coils bifilar?

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Re: Alternator setup
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2009, 20:18:17 pm »
that waveform just looks how it should look! where do you measure the blue line? at the tube?

on picture IMG2315.JPG, is the box a transformer? are the two coils bifilar?

The yellow one is the Lawton pulse with gating on, and the blue one is over the cell.

Yes the two coils are biffs, but they are not connected and a DC-DC transformer.

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Re: Alternator setup
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2009, 20:20:29 pm »
that waveform just looks how it should look! where do you measure the blue line? at the tube?

on picture IMG2315.JPG, is the box a transformer? are the two coils bifilar?

The yellow one is the Lawton pulse with gating on, and the blue one is over the cell.

then  the waveform is exactly as it should. the only thing important is the power consumption of the whole system.
anyway, good work!

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Re: Alternator setup
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2009, 20:49:37 pm »

 If that motor pulling the Alternator is getting hot, a bigger pulley will do WORSE. You need a bigger HP motor.

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Re: Alternator setup
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2009, 21:10:50 pm »
very nice project page webmug.. i was thinking and when we are experimenting with these alternator set ups.. if we want to do it with accurate testing.. we need to find a electric motor that is capable of 5 hp and variable rpms..  can you regulate ac voltage to a electric motor to slow it down? what happens with rpm is as they go up the alternators frequency is climbing to.. higher frequencys create more current.. so in a resonant circuit more current creates stronger displacements..  so volts must go up at higher rpms? and current doesnt occur because they climb in unison due to there balanced chokes.

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Re: Alternator setup
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2009, 21:30:58 pm »
The Horse Power you need is determined by your cell. First of all the resonate waveform is "Perfect" square waves, and on the very top of these square waves is rectified 3 phase harmonics. To get this wave form you must pull power from the stator and insert it into its rotor, The left over power is what powers the fuel cell Aka "Resonating Capacitor." Since you have a very small motor then you must have small capacitance, About 2 or 3 Tube cells will give you the capacitance needed to gain resonance giving your weak motor. Higher resonance can be seen with more cells.

The more tubes you have in parallel the more your Capacitance will be, However with higher capacitance comes greater demands for electrical power. In All, or Most cases resonance is achieved at 1.6 Pulsing Lopped amps to the rotor at a very low voltage, No External voltage source will allow you this waveform meaning to get a "Pure" wave you must use the stator as the Main power source to the rotor. If you used anything more than a simple 9 volt MA battery to hit resonance with then you do not understand the process nor how it works. You will max out a 3 HP motor with 12 tubes. When you Hit resonance you will Notice the Current Draw from your Driver Motor DROP. Example, Remove your motors Belt, Turn it on.

How much power does it consume? Now apply Pressure to the shaft of your motor.. You thought current flow would go UP instead of down didn't you But you whitinessthed it to go down when you applied pressure to the shaft. When the alternator is in resonance with any given cell it is tuned with the driver motor.

When you use only 1 tube cell with this setup, you have Lower resistance and lower capacitance. The more cells in parallel the lower your resistance will become. If you add a cell your resistance isn't effected that much however the capacitance is. There is a certain amount of tubes, size to be used with each setup. In your case givin your type of motor its not suprizing to see resonance at 4 or so very small tubes, 2 inches tall. Your setup is not for 6 bigger tubes, a 3 quarter horse is needed for that, any more than a 3 quarter horse on 6 tubes and you have flawed your circuit and passed resonance up, Meaning you are trying to get more gas from the tubes out of resonance then they're capable of dilivering during resonance. Resonance will show you the third power, Dont expect anything more from this small, Neat Bench science Learning lab setup.

I would like to also add, I have not seen 1 person Properly hit resonance other than master stevie all because they fail to perform the loop. 1 tube cell will take as much as 60 volts and consume as much as 20 amps if you let it. During resonance it is not possible for voltage to go so high when the proper conditions are met. If you play with this setup and if you put effort into it,, you will hit resonance if you perform this loop. But again the gas measured only proves efficiency and what can be done, its a learning lab for the ones that do not understand how the third power works, Harmonics is not needed to gain the third power but in this particular setup harmonics must be established. With 6 fuel cells resonance was recorded at 8 volts across the cell, with large electrical fields also applied, it is not possible to gain resonance with 12 tubes using a 3 HP motor because the resistance is lower than 0.7 OHMS. To be sure I have not to badly confused you, You are running 1 tube cell and it doesn't contain a great deal of capacitance, nor resistance. This means that when you power on your cell voltage "is allowed" to go up. Where each tube you add you control the amount of applied voltage. The deregulated alternator will drop in voltage according to your resistance of your parallel cells. There is alot to this setup but its actually very simple to understand once you get the hang of it.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2009, 22:01:16 pm by Brian Coats »

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Re: Alternator setup
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2009, 17:32:39 pm »
I like delta, cant stand wye. Wye is in stans patents i know, Threw all my test i was uncomfortable with it, The loop likes delta.

You can perform one simple test, remove all electronics and fuel cells from your setup, Leave the diodes in tact. If you manage to spin your rotor at 3k rpm's you can take the 2 wires from your rotor and connect them directly to the stator, Hold for 6 seconds. You will see an nasty arc. The polarity of the rotor must be connected according to the polarity of your stator, "guess at it." If you got no ark then charge your rotor with a 12 volt battery for about 3 seconds. This will give you a permanent magnetic on the rotor and will always be available when you kickstart using a freq. When you see this arc then you must learn to control it during the loop. The fuel cell goes across the stator and a capacitor is needed across the rotor to help regulations. The resistance of the fet needed to do this is FQA30N40 which is not ment to be used for a Pulsing resistor but will work and survive when the other irf etc'ss die. Also contact stevie to ask him what other chips may work. I believe he used an irf threw some of his test but I never had any luck outta them.

When you start getting this arc you need to place a fet regulator as i have mentioned between the arc zone, This regulates the power from the stator into the rotor, it both restricts current, "resist's" and does so at a frequency. And the resistance i have found to work was of the FQA fet. The fet will regulate all the way down to the milliamps or up to the bigger amps. when 2 amps is flowing from the stator to the rotor threw this resistor they usually pop which is why I also recommend the FQA. If you was to put "Points" between the arc point, and a resistor across these points you could start the setup, arc the points for 6 seconds and let go. The dc light in parallel with the points would probably shine or shoot depending on the lights resistance, which is why you can see the resistance of the fet to be crucial for this setup. 
« Last Edit: April 18, 2009, 18:12:33 pm by Brian Coats »