Author Topic: My Copper and Stainless cell Project. Major Failure.  (Read 11308 times)

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My Copper and Stainless cell Project. Major Failure.
« on: March 10, 2009, 15:53:04 pm »
Don't even bother with this... all the solder points disolved with the KOH!!!



I have been testing using copper for the negative electrode and stainless for the positive with good results.

My only reason to test copper is because it is cheeper and easier to use than SS.

So far I have ran a copper cell for 72 hours and still no indication of copper breakdown on top of that the water stays clean. I like my water clean.

Since Stevie noticed better production when the outer tube is negative, next going to  use copper as the outer tube.

« Last Edit: May 08, 2009, 17:48:05 pm by electrojolt »

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Re: My Copper and Stainless cell Project.
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2009, 15:04:55 pm »
The water is conducting. there is no problem there.

I was going to get some 3/4 copper pipe to test using copper for the outer tube, but I just realized I have about 8 feet of 1/4" SS tube. I also have some 1/2 copper pipe.

So I will be testing using what I have. Going to make as many cells as I can using these materials.

In this economy can't waste money...

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Re: My Copper and Stainless cell Project.
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2009, 03:24:57 am »
Yes, I'm pulsing using my stable PWM and it is working ok. I added another section to the circuit to extract power from the cell during the gating and it looks like it is causing the current to drop almost 400 miliamps. Still trying to confirm this.

I just finished cutting the pipes for the next copper cell experiment.

18  outer copper 1/2" tubes, 4 inch long.

18 inner SS 1/4" tubes, 5 inch long.




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Re: My Copper and Stainless cell Project.
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2009, 03:52:45 am »
So far using the copper as the nagative electrode works just fine with no effect on the copper at all. and I ran 5 AMPS into the 3 little tube cells, with the copper as negative, water stayed clean.

I also ran the cell for over 72 hours between 1 and 2 AMPS. Same thing, water very clean and nothing wrong with the copper.

the only time I saw a problem with copper is when using copper for the positive, or when the water gets very hot. burning hot.

I know, every one says not to use copper because it makes the water green, and the copper corrodes, but I think that is because they used copper for both positive and negative.

Actually when using copper as negative, it gets a white protective coating, I think that is some SS from the positive electrode.

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Re: My Copper and Stainless cell Project.
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2009, 09:55:41 am »
Yes, I'm pulsing using my stable PWM and it is working ok. I added another section to the circuit to extract power from the cell during the gating and it looks like it is causing the current to drop almost 400 miliamps. Still trying to confirm this.

I just finished cutting the pipes for the next copper cell experiment.

18  outer copper 1/2" tubes, 4 inch long.

18 inner SS 1/4" tubes, 5 inch long.


Electrojolt is going to write history with his coppertubecell!

br
Steve

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Re: My Copper and Stainless cell Project.
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2009, 15:31:55 pm »
Since we are looking at Brute force method here, I would like to suggest the current draw be kept between 0.25A and 0.5A/sq. in of the surface area of the smallest electrode. Meaning, the current draw for 0.5" inner tube, 4" long, should be:
pi*0.5"*4"=6.28 sq. in, divided by 4 = 1.57A min, divided by 2 = 3.14A max. The copper cathode's significantly lower resistance than SS, should produce much more gas at these current levels than using a SS cathode.

Also, the optimum voltage per cell should be 1.8V-2.5V. A series configuration will be best and efficiency goes very high when the voltage across the series cell is more than 24V.

Hope this helps.

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Re: My Copper and Stainless cell Project.
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2009, 16:41:15 pm »
Thanks CowboyRX....

yes it does help.

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Re: My Copper and Stainless cell Project.
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2009, 01:59:29 am »
I just ran a quick test, 3 of these tubes in parallel use 3 AMPS at 2.5 volts.