Author Topic: Vic Coil  (Read 32124 times)

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Re: Vic Coil
« Reply #96 on: May 05, 2009, 23:21:16 pm »
i remember now when i was rewinding the coil that it was crossed over......what a downer.

tricky tricky......but you are on point.

i am sorry for this mistake i completely forgot that you crossed the wires over yourself.

i will try the B field flow in the opposite direction though.....really running out of things here....

http://sol.sci.uop.edu/~jfalward/magneticforcesfields/magneticforcesfields.html

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Re: Vic Coil
« Reply #97 on: May 06, 2009, 20:14:17 pm »
Remember for this kind of massive coil you will need a BIG pulser and alot of amps on primary side. I believe primary resistance is about 4 Ohms and secondary total is about 21 kOhms. That means in order to get at least 3 mAmps(Stan Meyer record low resonance Amps on 2ndary side) on 2ndary side you will need at least 15-16 Amps on primary side(which means minimum 60 V primary voltage and 900 W peak input...).....  And maybe you will need abit more amps to trigger the resonance start sequence.

I have seen the Vancouver Gadgeteers big pulser that can output 200 V and at 12 V it can output max 60 amps.. Looks like it might fit...

Otherwise let´s do a smaller VIC, just decrease all turns by 90% to ease the amp draw for the hobbyist size. We will see what is the best solution.


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Re: Vic Coil
« Reply #98 on: May 06, 2009, 20:27:44 pm »
I am pretty sure this coil was designed for 3.3 amps at 12 volts = 40 watts.

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Re: Vic Coil
« Reply #99 on: May 06, 2009, 22:54:03 pm »
I am pretty sure this coil was designed for 3.3 amps at 12 volts = 40 watts.

^ yep ^


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Re: Vic Coil
« Reply #100 on: May 07, 2009, 20:13:27 pm »
Well my maths tell me at 12 V you get 3 Amps primary side and 3/5 mAmps on secondary side. Sorry but I never heard anyone achieve resonance with those numbers. Correct me if I am wrong. The VIC was designed to run an engine and 900 Watts peak input at 42.8 kHz, gives at let´s say 40 pulses with burst freq of 1/3 Hz as many good experimenters have used, that makes very little(single digit watt or rather less(ca 0.3 Watts) - where is my calculator??!) input anyway.. But the peak input is massive. I don´t believe anyone will get bubbles at peak input of 40 Watts. That is if they don´t use spark gaps or more exotic stuff. Since Stan mentioned 3 mAmps as record low I am inclined to believe him, that makes kind of sense to me after some experiments with low amps experiment.

Prove me wrong please but at the moment I am inclined to go with this. The hobbyists that use 3 Amps primary side use coils with like 500 turns 2ndary side copper(AWG30 or less) and no SS430FR. That is a different story and has no resistance.

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Re: Vic Coil
« Reply #101 on: May 07, 2009, 20:23:01 pm »
Yea... but this coil is designed to process 7.4 micro liters of water at a time, that is a tiny drop of water the size of a pin head.

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Re: Vic Coil
« Reply #102 on: May 08, 2009, 01:34:58 am »
Well my maths tell me at 12 V you get 3 Amps primary side and 3/5 mAmps on secondary side. Sorry but I never heard anyone achieve resonance with those numbers. Correct me if I am wrong. The VIC was designed to run an engine and 900 Watts peak input at 42.8 kHz, gives at let´s say 40 pulses with burst freq of 1/3 Hz as many good experimenters have used, that makes very little(single digit watt or rather less(ca 0.3 Watts) - where is my calculator??!) input anyway.. But the peak input is massive. I don´t believe anyone will get bubbles at peak input of 40 Watts. That is if they don´t use spark gaps or more exotic stuff. Since Stan mentioned 3 mAmps as record low I am inclined to believe him, that makes kind of sense to me after some experiments with low amps experiment.

Prove me wrong please but at the moment I am inclined to go with this. The hobbyists that use 3 Amps primary side use coils with like 500 turns 2ndary side copper(AWG30 or less) and no SS430FR. That is a different story and has no resistance.

actually the vic cannot run an engine.

it needs an air ionizer to accomplish this.

and at lc resonance current through the inductor is at a maximum therefore energy stored in the magnetic field is at a maximum.

please read the tech brief.

there is more going on here then a simple stepup transformer ratio equation.

read and prove yourself wrong.

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Re: Vic Coil
« Reply #103 on: May 08, 2009, 12:40:09 pm »
@Kinesis, that WFC letter is no news to me, many people read it and many differ on the conclusions.... What I meant was that the VIC actually was used to pulse and ionize ambient air and water mist in the end. And if used for the WFC it is less than 1 Watts still  that means you need massive amps during each burst. Try to grasp the difference between the WFC and the Taylor cone solution with water mist. ALL experimenters I have seen with a good video has 2ndary side amps more than 3 mAmps. And if you use a continuous pulser with many bursts per second(typical Lawton type or equivalent)  you will short the cell and the resonance will swing wildly as the water heats up and the capacitance changes. Burst frequency that is where 95% of all experimenters get lost. There should NOT be continuos bursts to the WFC or else you short and heat it up, 1/3 Hz burst freq is just fine as mentioned by many people who actually got it right. For the dry cell there is a different story.

@ Donald, yes I agree and that still corresponds to 0.3 Watts input and still you will need many amps when using the correct burst freq.

Anyway, in case you have experimental proof pls show them and tell us which burst freq you use. A small advice, check out the big pulser from Vancouver gadgeteers with 60 Amps input  at 12 V and a max V of 200 V out from the pulser.....  That actually sounds like well built to me.

Anyway, testing will tell the whole story, and WFC is just a toy compared to the dry cell.