Author Topic: Longitudinal waves, the secret?  (Read 14818 times)

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Re: Longitudinal waves, the secret?
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2009, 17:03:14 pm »
i could picture a longitudinal wave inside the water gap, a push pull wave traveling though the aligned water molecules, Stan says the voltage never drops to zero in between the pulses, and the water maintains a voltage, this means the water stays aligned in the water gap, so with each pulse, it is an attraction force pulling on the water, then pulse off, it lets go, so it is a longitudinal wave of electrical stress.

its like if you have a rubber band and you keep pulling directly outwards on the ends, back and forth, you are creating a compression/expansion wave in the longitudinal direction. same thing happens on the water molecules.

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Re: Longitudinal waves, the secret?
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2009, 17:15:15 pm »
from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longitudinal_wave

Maxwell's equations do lead to the appearance of longitudinal waves under some circumstances in either plasma waves or guided waves. Basically distinct from the "free-space" waves, such as those studied by Hertz in his UHF experiments, are Zenneck waves.[5] The longitudinal mode of a resonant cavity is a particular standing wave pattern formed by waves confined in a cavity. The longitudinal modes correspond to the wavelengths of the wave which are reinforced by constructive interference after many reflections from the cavity's reflecting surfaces. Recently, Haifeng Wang et al. proposed a method that can generate longitudinal electromagnetic (light) wave in free space, and this wave can propagate without divergence for a few wavelengths.[6]


there ya go, absolutely no doubt that there are longitudinal standing waves in the resonant cavity's water gap :)

not a secret anymore

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Re: Longitudinal waves, the secret?
« Reply #10 on: April 07, 2009, 17:19:16 pm »
check this out


from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonant_cavity

Mechanical

Mechanical resonators are used in electronic circuits to generate signals of a precise frequency. These are called piezoelectric resonators, the most common of which is the quartz crystal. They are made of a thin plate of quartz with metal plates attached to each side, or in low frequency clock applications a tuning fork shape. The quartz material performs two functions. Its high dimensional stability and low temperature coefficient makes it a good resonator, keeping the resonant frequency constant. Second, the quartz's piezoelectric property converts the mechanical vibrations into an oscillating voltage, which is picked up by the plates on its surface, which are electrically attached to the circuit. These crystal oscillators are used in quartz clocks and watches, to create the clock signal that runs computers, and to stabilize the output signal from radio transmitters


Stan says you can use QUARTZ in between the  electrodes in the water fuel cell injector

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Re: Longitudinal waves, the secret?
« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2009, 17:24:14 pm »
just keeps getting better

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_spin_resonance

Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) or electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a technique for studying chemical species that have one or more unpaired electrons, such as organic and inorganic free radicals or inorganic complexes possessing a transition metal ion. The basic physical concepts of EPR are analogous to those of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), but it is electron spins that are excited instead of spins of atomic nuclei. Because most stable molecules have all their electrons paired, the EPR technique is less widely used than NMR. However, this limitation to paramagnetic species also means that the EPR technique is one of great specificity, since ordinary chemical solvents and matrices do not give rise to EPR spectra.

OXYGEN is paramagnetic, and/because it has unpaired electrons!



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Re: Longitudinal waves, the secret?
« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2009, 17:45:23 pm »
there ya go, absolutely no doubt that there are longitudinal standing waves in the resonant cavity's water gap :)

not a secret anymore
;D
rubberbanding effect  :P
BUT
can't get a full or half wave in the resonant cavity at low kHz frequencies, do the math: wavelength (=length waveguide) = C/F = 3E8  / 1E4 = 3E4 meter resonant cavity needed for a single standing wave.
At high MHz/GHz it might be possible and do-able.

You can get the 'tail' or the end node of the wave as a standing wave in the cavity, the coilwire would contain the rest of the wave. Google frolov
wait, here ya go:
http://www.alternativkanalen.com/work.html
(nah, not sure yet myself)

I posted this a while ago in my cute little spam thread:
Quote
This [dielectric] breakdown is usually caused by stationary voltage spikes or "nodes" which are caused by standing waves. Standing waves are stationary and occur when part of the energy traveling down the line is reflected by an impedance mismatch with the load [Xl > Xc]. The voltage potential of the standing waves at the points of greatest magnitude can become large enough to break down the insulation between transmission line conductors.
The dielectric in waveguides is air, which has a much lower dielectric loss than conventional insulating materials. However, waveguides are also subject to dielectric breakdown caused by standing waves. Standing waves in waveguides cause arcing [which doesnt happen in the wfc, we have chokes] which decreases the efficiency of energy transfer and can severely damage the waveguide. Also since the electromagnetic fields are completely contained within the waveguide, radiation losses are kept very low.

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Re: Longitudinal waves, the secret?
« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2009, 18:06:26 pm »
i do believe the resonant frequency is a standing wave also.....regardless where the nodes and anti nodes are it's the fact that the potential field is not moving.....it is static in motion....why else would stanley show the resonant frequency equation in the beginning of the tech brief???...that equation is for a standing wave.

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Re: Longitudinal waves, the secret?
« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2009, 18:17:22 pm »
i think the standing wave resonance in the Resonant Cavity is a different wavelength than the pulsing frequency

sure, the compression/expansion of the water is pulsed at the same frequency the electronics provide, but the electrical wavelength is like you say meters long, but the actual molecular compressions and expansions are caused only by the electrical attraction force, and the amplitude of the electrical attraction force determines the amount of stretching on the water molecule, so the compression/expansion of the water would have it's own wavelength that is really small, in the units of Ångström's 


it's like every 1 second i pull on the rubber band, but with every pull i only stretch it 1 inch

the wavelength of the frequency 1 Hz is different than the wavelength of the actual stretching in my rubber band

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Re: Longitudinal waves, the secret?
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2009, 18:25:09 pm »
tell me what you think of this..  could those long waves mess with television broadcasted waves? you think it might have a little to do with why they switched from analog to digital.. because they knew this was gonna be getting on the market?