Author Topic: Winding method  (Read 13488 times)

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Re: Winding method
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2009, 23:11:21 pm »
Is anybody selling the VIC bobbin yet?

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Re: Winding method
« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2009, 02:28:33 am »
ask donaldwfc

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Re: Winding method
« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2013, 09:09:38 am »
I just finished my design for coil spinner assembly and began printing to solid body printer. Ever try to find a service provider for twisting film coated electrical wire as thin as your hair? If you want the job done you have to build the tools yourself.

 the benefits of bifilar wire vary depending on direction of induced current flow but for my purpose raise the capacitance of opposing current flows against the capacitance of the load like this, pulse pulse pulse pulse charge1 charge2+charge1 charge2+charge3 charge3+charge4 collapse extract electrons from dielectric with least constant and repeat cycle. So, here is the machine needed for the needed bifilar capability.

I like the pancake coil theory because it matches one of stans latest drawings found in the tech brief.  note also that he described his bifilar windings as axially spiraled pair.  That is my goal and to make this machine an open source project because I need help financially to complete the first prototype and build for those who make contribution - how is the best way to structure it so I could focus on the fabrication environment instead of the administrative function?

Here is the video for the new spool spinner machine, give us your feedback:  http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/805268116/1810618606?token=539571d1
« Last Edit: November 01, 2013, 16:06:08 pm by urizan »

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Re: Winding method
« Reply #19 on: October 30, 2013, 09:28:24 am »
Is anybody selling the VIC bobbin yet?

Unfortunately, yes.  they're expensive though.  it takes me about a week to make from better than derlin material and I estimate charging 600 for one, 800 for two, 1000 for 3, 1200 for 4 of them.

Here is a photo of mine below but right now I am trying to ask for help with a spool spinner design I'm building to give capability of producing axially spiraled 430 f/fr film coated stainless wire 38AWG.  If anybody knows where to buy more of the wire I need some.  I need help from someone who could handle contributions and for an open source project to build the first in house wire spinner and we could pay them back with the machine after they're working.

Notice I haven't wound any wire on vic bobbin core yet because that would not be following the tech brief instructions without a spool spinner machine to twist the wire together first.

Here is the video for the new spool spinner machine, http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/805268116/1810618606?token=539571d1
« Last Edit: November 01, 2013, 14:27:10 pm by Steve »

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Re: Winding method
« Reply #20 on: October 31, 2013, 21:59:01 pm »

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Re: Winding method
« Reply #21 on: October 31, 2013, 23:37:56 pm »
It took 3 months to make the winder. I had to do a lot of prototyping to see what worked. Especially the trolley.
 
The winder is a prototype. It works well.  There are some improvements that I'll put into the next one I make.
 
The counter came from allelectronics, I hand made the box it is in along with the buttons. The board is in the top section of the winder.
 
The main drive is out of an inkjet printer.
 
The wire tensioner was also made twice before I got that right.

Thats pretty impressive work you did.  I was an electronics engineer fresh out of school and straight into the computer garage era back when Apple hadn't even come out yet.  Intel representative noticed we were purchasing certain chips from them and came to our house in Los Angeles holding Apples first computer and told us we have competition!  Now that I'm up in years I'm in Stan Meyers garage looking around and thinking we need to take action on some capabilities we're missing for the moment.

In order to follow the tech. brief for 38awg 430 f/31 wire to be twisted thousands of feet at a time without breaking I came up with a new prototype I think will work.

I hope you will leave feedback for the idea and let me know if any of you think we could make this happen:  http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/805268116/1810618606?token=539571d1

Thanks.  Ron.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2013, 14:29:09 pm by Steve »