Author Topic: What is WATER?  (Read 7386 times)

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Re: What is WATER?
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2008, 23:02:59 pm »
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Rubbing two nonconductive objects generates a great amount of static electricity.

Usually insulators, e.g., substances that do not conduct electricity, are good at both generating, and holding, a surface charge. Some examples of these substances are rubber, plastic, glass, and pith.

Note that the presence of electric current does not detract from the electrostatic forces nor from the sparking, from the corona discharge, or other phenomena. Both phenomena can exist simultaneously in the same system.


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Re: What is WATER?
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2008, 23:08:10 pm »
Nice!

A similar charging mechanism can occur within low conductivity fluids flowing through pipelines - a process called flow electrification. Fluids which have low electrical conductivity (below 50 pico siemens/cm, where pico siemens/cm is a measure of electrical conductivity), are called accumulators. Fluids having conductivities above 50 pico siemens/cm are called non-accumulators. In non-accumulators, charges recombine as fast as they are separated and hence electrostatic charge generation is not significant. In the petrochemical industry, 50 pico siemens/cm is the recommended minimum value of electrical conductivity for adequate removal of charge from a fluid.

An important concept for insulating fluids is the static relaxation time. This is similar to the time constant (tau) within an RC circuit. For insulating materials, it is the ratio of the static dielectric constant divided by the electrical conductivity of the material. For hydrocarbon fluids, this is sometimes approximated by dividing the number 18 by the electrical conductivity of the fluid. Thus a fluid that has an electrical conductivity of 1 pico siemens /cm will have an estimated relaxation time of about 18 seconds. The excess charge within a fluid will be almost completely dissipated after 4 to 5 times the relaxation time, or 90 seconds for the fluid in the above example.

Charge generation increases at higher fluid velocities and larger pipe diameters, becoming quite significant in pipes 8 inches (200 mm) or larger. Static charge generation in these systems is best controlled by limiting fluid velocity. The British standard BS PD CLC/TR 50404:2003 (formerly BS-5958-Part 2) Code of Practice for Control of Undesirable Static Electricity prescribes velocity limits. Because of its large impact on dielectric constant, the recommended velocity for hydrocarbon fluids containing water should be limited to 1 m/s.


So it seems that when we put water in an accelerator tube which is circulair, you can charge the water just by speed!

Steve

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Re: What is WATER?
« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2008, 18:05:47 pm »
Very interesting stuff indeed.

Looking at stan's resonant cavity WFC picture I can see why it's made of delrin. As a plastic it is very good at holding electrostatic charges.

During HV expirements at resonance I was able to charge the water with a  strong electrostatic field, after removing the HV source I could feel a huge static charge on the plastic container the water was in, and after touching the water I was shocked as the charge grounded through me.

Electrostatic fields are something of great interest to me. They are a good sign of the progress in our work. We are getting close! Very Close!

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Re: What is WATER?
« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2008, 20:07:42 pm »
Well,

I still having trouble understanding what the 90 / 10%  is.
If you look at the watermolecule with 2 hydrogens attached to it in a convalent bond, then i count just 2 other hydrogens left for the static part. So were does the 90/10 fit in..?

br
steve

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Re: What is WATER?
« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2008, 00:18:39 am »

 Does this have anything to do with breaking that covalent Bond of water ???

Quote
I am also curious about efficiency on the new sound wave
water to hydrogen technology, versus electrolysis. Instantly
vaporizes water, or can also immediately convert water into
thermo explosive energy

  I just read this at another site. Anyone know anything about this sound wave technology ??  Could this be usable info ??

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Re: What is WATER?
« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2008, 04:11:40 am »

 I have no idea. I just read that on another site ??  No way to try to duplicate that stuff down here !!

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Re: What is WATER?
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2008, 16:26:27 pm »
 This is probably way off topic, but, there is a guy at  THIS  link, with an action shot of a lightning strike. It shows pretty vivid detail ???

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Re: What is WATER?
« Reply #15 on: September 20, 2008, 11:58:28 am »
More comments on water:

The H2O molecule is a neat little thing; it is comprised of two H atoms and one O atom. The little thing holding them together is the electron. The electron is the only bonding force, however try pulling three magnets apart, not very hard is it, now take a swimming pool and fill it with magnets and try pulling one of them out, it becomes a lot harder because the force is increased over the entire surface area, and they are all bonded together. That is water in its natural state. But what makes this situation interesting is that it is not a simple electromagnetic bond, it is an electrostatic bond called the covalent bond. Scuffing your feet loads you up with electro-static energy, and touching something conductive discharges that energy. That means that if the electrostatic charge on an electron can be discharged, it will cease to bond.

ESD!

br
steve