Author Topic: Sequential high voltage distriuter  (Read 1957 times)

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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #32 on: July 27, 2020, 22:23:16 pm »
Today I got 100x 100kohm 3w 5% metal film resistors
This are non inductive..  it lead me to think one thing

The plan is to arrangement them in series and parallel to have high power dissipation

Use 40 for 1Mohm 120w but I plan to put up to 40ma
This would be 1600w

So I will probably try to make it very powerful


Could it be that stan was talking about resistors when he talk about his resistive wire coils?

His drawings resembles to me non inductive resistor wirewound resistor..

Also I took a look at magnetoresustance and when the materia is ferromagnetic the electrons can split between up or down spin along the line.. 

So good to feel interested again..
« Last Edit: July 28, 2020, 08:32:50 am by sebosfato »

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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #34 on: July 28, 2020, 08:29:05 am »
Hey steve thanks for the link
 I took a look at it but you seem to be talking about very slow signals.. what exactly you mean with charging with 30 amps and get it to charge the rotor back?

And I didnt really understood how is you cell holding 2.5v what electrolyte you used? On the oscilloscope it show same value?


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Why we didnt figured it out yet
« Reply #35 on: July 28, 2020, 10:41:14 am »
I think most of us went in the wrong way unfortunately mislead by trying to just copy and hope it could work.. I guess millions of dollar were spend until now.

However there are some very simple things I have seeing nobody test yet. not even the most experienced guys..

I can talk for myself and even if I have done so many study around the subject i think I didn't succeed making the correct setup for testing. Only now after so many years things are getting clear for myself.

10ma flow at 10kv involve a 100w transformer capable of sustaining such power..
20kv capable of 20ma is 400w.. 

Only in the last few years I started to notice how far from the number stan talk about we are sometimes.

So first step I'm taking is making this dummy load of very very high impedance. With this 100 100k resistors I plan to make a 2.5megaohm resistor with 300 watts hope is enough to prove my idea.

In the Colorado meeting stan talk about using voltage to induce oscillation instead of current.

My guess like I described in this thread is that when we reach a certain electric field inside the cell the dielectric value will be disturbed and equidistant separation among ions will be affected.. if we oscillate at the resonant frequency it will simply fall apart and so water capacitor will exhibit a high voltage across it but this voltage is going to be of course much lower than the voltage applied.. I believe for 20kv only 500v will be impressed upon the electrode if we reach resonance..

Here is something new I think the gate may have a special function for

The cell may need to be shorted periodically to be able to generate power from it... I think for this a scr in parallel with the cell with a resistor to protect the scr from over current.. for example we have 500v on the cell and we discharge into a 10ohm load it will give 50 amps peak.. or maybe even a diode in parallel with the cell.. it will depend of what kind of signal the cell will give back when we achieve such resonance.. 

A p type material supposedly have a conduction of holes not of electrons.. so what would happen if we short the cell with a source of holes? Would it make a difference?


The resistors I got are non inductive..  I'm thinking if meyer waveform could be that way because of inductive properties of resistors.. somewhere he says that the wave shape may prevent a spark like or something like this.. he also mentioned  a out of resonant condition..

The q factor of this resonance may be very very high so only very close to the resonant frequency will have any signal change... and may be only around 50v or even less without the pll... 

The probe dp30k will be used for measure this voltage across the cell.. but the precision is not so great.. I'm afraid we need some different or better way to detect the resonance..

Perhaps adding a magnetic field around the cell will make the ions in cell to have a circular motion so perhaps could be easier to get a signal like MRI... all is needed is a coil around the cell and a choke in series with it... than simply measure ac across the choke applying dc to the inductor coil.

This method of detection may be easier and more accessible..  a step up secondary on the choke may help increase sensibility while isolate decouple from the dc signal... another way is to use a capacitor but will not increase sensibility.

If we limit the current to 10ma the signal will only be able to peak at resonance if the ions are really getting shaked by the potential electric field applied in the cell..
« Last Edit: July 28, 2020, 14:43:42 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #36 on: July 29, 2020, 00:15:03 am »
Today the 100x  resistors arrived.. however the guy delivered 74 of metal film and 30 of wire wound.. all 3watts rated..

The nice thing is that I can test having some more inductance... too... maybe compare.. maybe even try with magnetic field...

I was thinking about and maybe the best way to get this high voltage required is by using a resonance tank

On the final device The primary may be arranged with a capacitor to match the resonant frequency to that of water.. and so if we have 1000 v in resonance on the primary a 1:30 step will make high voltage on secondary side... all that is needed is to push power into it...

That's why I say is so hard we tried to find a needle deep in ocean.. 

First to test we must need a real high voltage transformer with power enough to .maintain the minimum current needed to stimulate or kick in resonance.. 

Ideally a 800 watts 40kv transformer shoukd do it.. 

If working from 100 volts it would need 8 amps
It could sustain 40kv at 20ma... with a 2 mega ohm resistance...





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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #37 on: July 29, 2020, 20:21:42 pm »
Hey steve thanks for the link
 I took a look at it but you seem to be talking about very slow signals.. what exactly you mean with charging with 30 amps and get it to charge the rotor back?

And I didnt really understood how is you cell holding 2.5v what electrolyte you used? On the oscilloscope it show same value?

It means that the power from the cell was fed into the rotor (thru a mosfet)

I did not use any electrolyte.....scope also showed 2.5v

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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #38 on: July 30, 2020, 04:00:48 am »
Do u have a diagrams of it? How you got 30 Amps at only 1.5 v? And the voltage was peaking after turn off?

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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #39 on: July 30, 2020, 10:04:19 am »
Do u have a diagrams of it? How you got 30 Amps at only 1.5 v? And the voltage was peaking after turn off?

Fabio, the leftover voltage is heavely depending on how much voltage you put in.

My alternator was unregulated. So it hit the wfc with 36v pulses.
So when you pulse the rotor and because of that also the power to the wfc, there is a short periode where the wfc acts as a capacitor.
Normally, you out max 5v to the rotor...
The charge of the wfc was after charging, enough for charging the rotor...