Author Topic: Sequential high voltage distriuter  (Read 1997 times)

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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #24 on: July 24, 2020, 10:26:16 am »
We played in the past with that double cell setup and a lc tank.....
In tour schematic, the secondairy must have a higher resistance then the cells with coils....
I think that your setup deals better with the freed electrons and the bemf from the coils.
So it might be another way that works.
The question is on how efficient it will be and what type of isotopes it creates...



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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #25 on: July 24, 2020, 13:54:57 pm »
Steve i think the idea would be to reach the megayield gas production... somehow I believe if we match the real water resonance with the electrical resonance the dielectric will not be able to keep the ions equidistant.. they will start to oscillate and when the reach a certain separation strange things may happen..

I'm not really sure what is going to be the mechanism that will lead to water split with no current flow... but my guess will be what tayhehan describe or the fracture cell... a high field will make the molecules to form atoms and than form diatonic molecules generating heat.

As you noticed I worried about leaving a free path for the ions to go.. I agree we made tests close to this in the past but I didnt had the knowledge or the ideas I have today about how to match the frequency and so on.

I'm starting to feel like it makes sense to get high resistance to water for making tests...

Things we know resonant frequency of water changes with concentration and type of electrolyte.. with this our chances would be already better

But if we manage to test this frequency in a controlled manner like with very very high resistor I fell we are going to make it.

You remember Dan danfor there was a 60w resistor somewhere

Anothe thing we know from tayhe and from david haitin patent is that the electric field required is in the order of 20kv/mm at very low water ion concentration..

I think if we deal with the screening of the charge by having a current to flow under resonance basically we start to have the chance to conduct the high electric field to water my impressions is that er just need to overcome it saturate the current on the electrode such as we can have a limitation on conduction of ions and perhaps increasing the cell resistance dramatically over it. This mean that the cell resistance should decrease while we increase the voltage and if we continue to rise the limit on current flow will be reached and after that the resistance will be the other two transport and availability..



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Cell size vs polarization curve of electrolysis
« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2020, 14:48:33 pm »
Polarization curves are awesome source of info

I checked Google for it and seems like 1 amp per cm2 is likely a point where cells will start to have very high resistance.. so if our cells electrodes have at least 30 cm2 we need more than 30amps to get there...

May have he fooled us? Or there maybe was something between those electrodes? Perhaps a membrane or some fill of some material.. maybe barium titanate powder... who knows ... just guessing here

But if we wanted to see some effect of high voltage on water we need to get the water electrode to be able to take away the ions of the way so the transport resistance will increase geometrically!

So the only manner to get the water to become a resistor of very high value would be to apply very high voltage current to it

There is two ways I see this

Capacitive discharge or inductive discharge

During a capacitive discharge we know the only limitation is resistance of the circuit so if we apply 1000v capacitive discharge we are indeed applying 1kv  subtracted by resistance and current product... so if above certain current water become gigantic resistance we simply just need to make it happens with an inductive or capacitive discharge...

Advantage of inductive discharge is that we can control by current while the capacitor will have maxim voltage first the voltage at an inductir will rise if resistance is raised in the circuit..

I think would be a nice idea to make a arduino program to draw polarization curves... so we can study the behavior of different electrolytes and concentrations on this..

I think with 40 amps diode in the circuit we should have thought about what is actually happening better..

Maybe and more probably the saturation current will be less at Lower concentration of electrolytes but would be wonderful to be able to simply test it wouldn't it?

I have a arduino current sensor somewhere 20 amps rated I'm thinking to make a program that draw a graph on the nextion screen for every 100mv change it takes the current value and plot to the graph than we can have a small section of electrodes maybe 2 cm2 and test with diferente electrolytes, ppm and so on.

Need to have a voltage reading as well.. let's say up to 100v so a impedance as function of voltage can be obtained too...

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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #27 on: July 25, 2020, 11:32:14 am »
Do not confuse kv for joules..
If you do a discharge of induction or capacitance, it is the joule that works.
1kv burst can last very short or very long...
Depending on resistance of the discharge circuit.


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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #28 on: July 25, 2020, 19:14:21 pm »
What i mean was that the inductive discharge for say we put 50 amps .. up to 30 amps water will have a resistance than the resistance increase exponentially

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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #29 on: July 26, 2020, 16:33:27 pm »
Questiono for you


How much resistance do you think we need to be able to measure water resonance

What is the minimum voltage with restricted current that will be able to put the water cell in resonance..

Will the cell show a voltage increase when drive in resonance?

Want your opinions...

Thanks a lot


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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #30 on: July 26, 2020, 17:13:34 pm »
Questiono for you


How much resistance do you think we need to be able to measure water resonance

What is the minimum voltage with restricted current that will be able to put the water cell in resonance..

Will the cell show a voltage increase when drive in resonance?

Want your opinions...

Thanks a lot

I can only speak out of my own experience, Fabio.
Brian and i got some kind of resonance with the alternator setup.
We charged the cell and powerd the rotor coil with charge coming of the cell.
So, the only time i got a workable charge back from the cell was when i charged it with 30amps or higher.

I posted some weeks ago the charging characteristics of a waterfuelcell.
Maybe that can help?
The resistance is a part of it...

I think that if you charge a wfc, how tiny and or with low amps, you should consider very low frequency pulses.
a 3 second burst till 3hz. Then shut the pulse off and extract / resonate the charge out of it, before the charge is lost in the electrolysis proces.


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Re: Sequential high voltage distriuter
« Reply #31 on: July 27, 2020, 01:00:32 am »
I think it can help yes. What section you posted it?

My plan is to make a 1:100 transformer and have ac applied to it... on the secondary side I'm going to use a series of resistors arranged in series and parallel to give 1Mohm 80w

Than connect the transformer to the square wave source...

Instead of square ac we could use pulsed dc but than we need to add a resistor witha diode in parallel with primary to compensate the wave form..

Ideally would be nice a 100v square wave source resulting in 10kv ... but perhaps for test up to 40kv could be nice.. 40ma with 1Mohm