Author Topic: Reverse Wired Transformers  (Read 349 times)

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #24 on: July 09, 2020, 00:39:41 am »
Being ignored is one thing, but disruption is entirely different.  I've been on the forums long enough to know there'll always be someone ready to step up to the plate and pull attention away from my presentation if it's about something new or sensitive.  So I've decided to move on.  I did get a couple of things from this forum: the new single wire circuit and the fact that a resistance increases the voltage.  So I'll still check in sometimes.  Good luck with your discussion.

PS:  Your question seems like a begged response.  But yes, the steel grid will rust if I leave it in the water very long.  The galvanised coating is already oxidized and that gives the electrode a P type semiconductor junction on its surface.  Plenty of bubbles there if this junction is cleaned off.

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #25 on: July 09, 2020, 03:31:30 am »
Being ignored is one thing, but disruption is entirely different.  I've been on the forums long enough to know there'll always be someone ready to step up to the plate and pull attention away from my presentation if it's about something new or sensitive.  So I've decided to move on.  I did get a couple of things from this forum: the new single wire circuit and the fact that a resistance increases the voltage.  So I'll still check in sometimes.  Good luck with your discussion.

PS:  Your question seems like a begged response.  But yes, the steel grid will rust if I leave it in the water very long.  The galvanised coating is already oxidized and that gives the electrode a P type semiconductor junction on its surface.  Plenty of bubbles there if this junction is cleaned off.

not sure what is going on but i just wanted to share somethoughs im very busy lately and don't share much with you recently so i just wrote some food for thought did not mean to disrupt you line of thinking. sorry if it sounded this way somehow. please dont get me wrong im indeed happy to see you all works!

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #26 on: July 10, 2020, 03:14:37 am »
Correction: according to Wikipedia, zinc oxide is an n-type semiconductor.

Anyone who's interested can figure out the rest themselves.

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #27 on: July 10, 2020, 09:41:46 am »
Electrical properties
ZnO has a relatively large direct band gap of ~3.3 eV at room temperature. Advantages associated with a large band gap include higher breakdown voltages, ability to sustain large electric fields, lower electronic noise, and high-temperature and high-power operation. The band gap of ZnO can further be tuned to ~3–4 eV by its alloying with magnesium oxide or cadmium oxide.[12]

Most ZnO has n-type character, even in the absence of intentional doping. Nonstoichiometry is typically the origin of n-type character, but the subject remains controversial.[30] An alternative explanation has been proposed, based on theoretical calculations, that unintentional substitutional hydrogen impurities are responsible.[31] Controllable n-type doping is easily achieved by substituting Zn with group-III elements such as Al, Ga, In or by substituting oxygen with group-VII elements chlorine or iodine.[32]

Reliable p-type doping of ZnO remains difficult. This problem originates from low solubility of p-type dopants and their compensation by abundant n-type impurities. This problem is observed with GaN and ZnSe. Measurement of p-type in "intrinsically" n-type material is complicated by the inhomogeneity of samples.[33]

Current limitations to p-doping limit electronic and optoelectronic applications of ZnO, which usually require junctions of n-type and p-type material. Known p-type dopants include group-I elements Li, Na, K; group-V elements N, P and As; as well as copper and silver. However, many of these form deep acceptors and do not produce significant p-type conduction at room temperature.[12]

Electron mobility of ZnO strongly varies with temperature and has a maximum of ~2000 cm2/(V·s) at 80 K.[34] Data on hole mobility are scarce with values in the range 5–30 cm2/(V·s).[35]

ZnO discs, acting as a varistor, are the active material in most surge arresters.[36][37]

the elevated band gap means it needs a higher electric field to become conductor... its used as a varistor element because when it reach a certain voltage field it become conductive and its resistance is restored when the field applied is not there anymore.

it may have a function in the cell working as a sort of dielectric? thats what you mean?

did you verify what is the lowest voltage at witch you will have current flow?

i was testing with potassium nitrate and ss and it need twice the voltage required than potassium hydroxide for example..

i think is possible to plate zinc over an electrode of copper or iron.. pehaps with some zinc sulfate and a piece of metalic zinc...

https://media.pearsoncmg.com/bc/bc_0media_chem/chem_sim/html5/Electro/Electro.php