Author Topic: Reverse Wired Transformers  (Read 350 times)

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Reverse Wired Transformers
« on: July 04, 2020, 01:15:28 am »
I've got a simple millivolt hv supply.  I took two identical transformers from some wall plug adaptors and reverse wired them, with series outputs.  The 12 Volt transformers are now putting out 2400V, at approximately one milliamp.  I'm using a string of four 1n4006 diodes which are each rated at 800V and one Amp.  With a 7MFd current limiting cap on the input, the diodes just barely get warm.  Without the cap, everything over heats, because the small transformers' secondaries aren't designed to be hooked to the mains, as primary windings.

This supply produces a small but respectable amount of little bubbles, which do pop under a flame.  (Using well water).  Something I've noticed is that with my plate cells, separated by thin strips of plastic, the bubbles are primarily produced where the plastic touches the metal.

 Now I'll reverse wire a couple of MOTs and run them with a genset, rather than a small inverter.  I'll current limit them with one or two motor running capacitors.

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2020, 01:47:51 am »
With this assembly, a single transformer is adequate for running a cell.  So I can run two cells, with the optional diode and using the secondary cross over wire as a center tap.

When I designed this configuration I was hoping for a bipolar output, and I've verified that is what it provides.  It's ike a single transformer with a center tap, when such is not available otherwise.  (As with a MOT).  With some added components, I can test this for powering a shape resonance circuit.

Using this with one cell, without the optional diode, gives opposing positive and negative pulses to the electrodes, with an additional unbalanced positive pulse going to one electrode.  Or perhaps I should reverse this polarity since almost all of the bubbles are coming off the negative electrode, whether it's on the inside or the outside.

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2020, 10:40:09 am »
So the two output leads provide a pulse at the same time?
Should they cancel eachother out?

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2020, 11:26:19 am »
So the two output leads provide a pulse at the same time?
Should they cancel eachother out?

The pulses have opposite polarity.  So this is actually doubling the intensity of the potential.  I tried wiring the secondaries straight across, and that's when the pulses cancelled out.  But it still works with a single transformer pumping hv electrons into the water.  Apparently, the second electrode builds a positive charge which pulls against the negative pulses, even when the pulses are out of phase.

This must be what Stan meant about switching off the covalent bonds.  With electrons all around, the Oxygen doesn't have to hang on to the Hydrogen to get it's extra electrons.

This definitely isn't normal water splitting since the bubbles only come off one electrode.

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2020, 12:56:19 pm »
 Can you post a video here of yr gas production with a view on the electrodes?
Compliments!

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2020, 13:16:39 pm »
Sounds like an afternoon project.  Give me 8 or 10 hours.  The only video I have right now is the plate cell, and it doesn't show the negative electrode bubbles.  Plus, waiting for the sun to recharge everything.

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2020, 22:07:55 pm »
I finally got a video, but I can't attach it to this site.  I'll have to put it on YouTube, and that's going to take a while, setting up a new account for this subject matter.

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Re: Reverse Wired Transformers
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2020, 00:50:05 am »
You know guys one thing i have being think about...
 
how could we use multiphase to create a sort of low voltage coil winding to have something like dc on it without the need of diodes... 

the electrodes shape should somehow perhaps help the ac to get filtered while keep a dc flow..

but what kind of device could create this low voltage high current dc current?

i have being thinking about it and perhaps is what we miss... activating the molecules with the high voltage seems to be only half the story to me...

Dc is required to complete the reactions on the electrodes so far as i concluded..  i think the key wold be to have a source of 500mv with high amperage would be enough if mix up with the ac to do the job...

how to generate dc with no diodes ?

i know how it can be done with mosfets but is a bit expensive to do...

i think we are missing something...

basically what i see is that when the molecules is broken from the ac field every increasing under resonance.. when the molecules are not able to discharge with their counter pair they simply move back and reform water molecule...
if we could isolate capacitively the cell we could verify that... high dielectric ceramics container would be a much to test with... but my guess is that meyer tried to make this isolation with resistors and inductors to block the flow of current to negligible amounts instead of using ceramics....

a resistor will create an isolation depending of course on the concept of isolation used.. the current flowing will create a potential gradient..

so maybe using a couple of them and different circuitry we could do some injury to water stability.