Author Topic: Charging a cell like a capacitor  (Read 477 times)

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Re: Charging a cell like a capacitor
« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2020, 14:54:16 pm »
Because of all your reactions..... :)

How about the shape of the following signal?
A halfwave sinewave of 0.3hz which is pulsed by 3hz!

Your comments?

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Re: Charging a cell like a capacitor
« Reply #9 on: June 28, 2020, 17:53:39 pm »
It's interesting that the cell's discharge time is so long with very low frequency pulses.  Why is a much shorter period needed with extremely high pulse repetition?

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Re: Charging a cell like a capacitor
« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2020, 18:08:07 pm »
It's interesting that the cell's discharge time is so long with very low frequency pulses.  Why is a much shorter period needed with extremely high pulse repetition?

Hi Tek, i dont understand your question here..... What is exactly yr point/question?

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Re: Charging a cell like a capacitor
« Reply #11 on: June 28, 2020, 22:06:37 pm »
Stan put a space after every five pulses, to allow the cell to discharge.  This was at a much higher frequency than your test.  With your low frequency pulses, the space has to be much longer.

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Re: Charging a cell like a capacitor
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2020, 03:15:11 am »
Does the rate at which the water molecules are shaken have an effect on how long the water capacitor takes to discharge?  Do the molecules continue vibrating after the pulses are switched off?

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Re: Charging a cell like a capacitor
« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2020, 08:23:09 am »
Hey steve.. your graph seems to say that the capacitance or current on the cell is dependent on its charge to a certain degree..

After it reach some charge build on the electrode it maybe change the resistance..