Author Topic: The final step towards running an engine on Hydroxy  (Read 41507 times)

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hydro

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Re: The final step towards running an engine on Hydroxy
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2008, 03:16:40 am »
if the hydrogen was resonating at 400 nm then it would be in a low energy state, and you can not see its energy state.

jbhuffinstuff

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Re: The final step towards running an engine on Hydroxy
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2008, 04:01:39 am »
in the right conditions the hydrogen will turn into a red colored gas that looks similar to to a redish pink neon sign

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Re: The final step towards running an engine on Hydroxy
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2008, 05:55:21 am »
Steve:

Great Post. I have performed industrial radiography and have performed work with tubeheads, Ir-192 and Co-60. Here's some input to consider in conjunction with the LED's. It's a cut and past dealing with radiation and further discussion with black light below.
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Theory of X-ray attenuation
A photon is an X-ray when it is formed by an event involving an electron, while the photon is a gamma ray when it comes from the nucleus of an atom. In general, medical radiography is done using X-rays formed in an X-ray tube. Nuclear medicine typically involves gamma rays.

The types of electromagnetic radiation of most interest to radiography are X-ray and gamma radiation. This radiation is much more energetic than the more familiar types such as radio waves and visible light. It is this relatively high energy which makes gamma rays useful in radiography but potentially hazardous to living organisms.

The radiation is produced by X-ray tubes, high energy X-ray equipment or natural radioactive elements, such as radium and radon, and artificially produced radioactive isotopes of elements, such as cobalt-60 and iridium-192. Electromagnetic radiation consists of oscillating electric and magnetic fields, but is generally depicted as a single sinusoidal wave. While in the past radium and radon have both been used for radiography, they have fallen out of use as they are irksome radiotoxic alpha radiation emitters which are expensive; iridium-192 and cobalt-60 are far better photon sources. For further details see commonly used gamma emitting isotopes.

Such a wave is characterised by its wavelength (the distance from a point on one cycle to the corresponding point on the next cycle) or its frequency (the number of oscillations per second). In a vacuum, all electromagnetic waves travel at the same speed, the speed of light (c). The wavelength (y, lambda) and the frequency (f) are all related by the equation:

f = c / y
This is true for all electromagnetic radiation.

Electromagnetic radiation is known by various names, depending on its energy. The energy of these waves is related to the frequency and the wavelength by the relationship:

E = hf = h (c / y)
Where h is a constant known as Planck's Constant.

Gamma rays are indirectly ionizing radiation. A gamma ray passes through matter until it undergoes an interaction with an atomic particle, usually an electron. During this interaction, energy is transferred from the gamma ray to the electron, which is a directly ionizing particle. As a result of this energy transfer, the electron is liberated from the atom and proceeds to ionize matter by colliding with other electrons along its path. Other times, the passing gamma ray interferes with the orbit of the electron, and slows it, releasing energy but not becoming dislodged. The atom is not ionised, and the gamma ray continues on, although at a lower energy. This energy released is usually heat or another, weaker photon, and causes biological harm as a radiation burn. The chain reaction caused by the initial dose of radiation can continue after exposure, much like a sunburn continues to damage skin even after one is out of direct sunlight.

Here's the whole article -->  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiography
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Here is some more laymen term input.

Visible light can be prismed or rainbowed and Red Light is on one end of the spectrum and Violet Light is on the other end of the visible light spectrum.

On the Red End, if you go a little bit further you get micro waves.  On the Violet End, you have "Black Light" then you get into your invisible light called x or gamma radiation that can shine through bone, metal and concrete and develop film just like natural light develops film using a photagraphic camera.

I have also used "high intensity" black lights to perform different types of fluorescent inspections. About 10 years ago I had to quit doing the black light work. If I didn't, I would have started getting cataracts in my eyes. I reached my personal threshold with this stuff when one day I briefly looked at the light and it gave me an instant migrane. Protection with the gamma ray sources was via personal dosimetry, film badges, survey meters (geiger counters) and the old rule "double the distance and 1/4 the intensity" or "run away"  ;)

It's called the inverse square law. This is where it gets really interesting in regards to what we are all attempting with Hydrogen production.
See --> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverse-square_law

Luckily we don't have the real serious type health consequenses with black light and it's close to and works with the same principles as gamma and x-rays. My point...Intensity is substantially increased by reducing the distance.

Also thanks for the info on the 350 Chevy, Haroldcr. Now I know what I have to make and produce.  ;D

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Re: The final step towards running an engine on Hydroxy
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2008, 06:38:17 am »
Here's some simple old school tube info.

--> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-ray_tube

Hmmm....Tungsten anode....needs electrons....what's the target.....

C/P --> As with any vacuum tube, there is an emitter, either a filament or cathode, which emits electrons into the vacuum and an anode to collect the electrons, thus establishing a flow of electrical current, known as the beam, through the tube. A high voltage power source is connected across cathode and anode, for example 30 to 150 kilovolts (kV). In many applications, the current flow (typically in the range 1mA to 1A) is able to be pulsed on for between about 1ms to 1s.

Now, what did SM say about how his process consumed energy?  ;)

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Re: The final step towards running an engine on Hydroxy
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2008, 09:52:30 am »
My B20 engine is puring like a kitten at 2 deg. After TDC on pure H2, il look in on other timing too but makes more sense to me to hawe ignition as close to TDC as you can

Just a static timing since there is no carb when im runing pure H2

Need some more equipment before I can deliver consumption numbers

Il hawe some video ready when the new intake manifold is in place


Mr Brown/H2inICE

H2,

Is it possible for you to make a vid of your B20 running?
Is it running on hydroxy or a bottle hydrogen?

br
Steve

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Re: The final step towards running an engine on Hydroxy
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2008, 10:01:32 am »
Here's some simple old school tube info.

--> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-ray_tube

Hmmm....Tungsten anode....needs electrons....what's the target.....

C/P --> As with any vacuum tube, there is an emitter, either a filament or cathode, which emits electrons into the vacuum and an anode to collect the electrons, thus establishing a flow of electrical current, known as the beam, through the tube. A high voltage power source is connected across cathode and anode, for example 30 to 150 kilovolts (kV). In many applications, the current flow (typically in the range 1mA to 1A) is able to be pulsed on for between about 1ms to 1s.

Now, what did SM say about how his process consumed energy?  ;)

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Flag,

I seen the same similarity also for months now.....Its in the back of my head, till the puzzles pieces drops into its right place..

Br
Steve

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Re: The final step towards running an engine on Hydroxy
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2008, 10:47:31 am »
Steve:

Great Post. I have performed industrial radiography and have performed work with tubeheads, Ir-192 and Co-60. Here's some input to consider in conjunction with the LED's. It's a cut and past dealing with radiation and further discussion with black light below.

In a vacuum, all electromagnetic waves travel at the same speed, the speed of light (c). The wavelength (y, lambda) and the frequency (f) are all related by the equation:

f = c / y
This is true for all electromagnetic radiation.

Flag,
Nice to have you here on our forum.

The speed of light in the vacuum of free space is an important physical constant usually denoted by the letter c. It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, in free space.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_light

Photons move at a speed less than c, unless they are travelling in vacuum.
The slow-down in condensed matter, such as gases, liquids and solids, can be considerable.

All this means that you get better results in a vacuum, if you wanna use photons.
I agree on your statement that the tube in which i wanna place these leds, must be small as possible.
The only thing where i am playing with, is the fact that Stan Meyer stated that he used an accelerator.
Meaning, that he was doing something with speeds higher then c, which could be possible, if i read all info well.


Travel faster than the speed of light in a medium
Although it may sound paradoxical, it is possible for shock waves to be formed with electromagnetic radiation. As a charged particle travels through an insulating medium, it disrupts the local electromagnetic field in the medium. Electrons in the atoms of the medium will be displaced and polarised by the passing field of the charged particle, and photons are emitted as the electrons in the medium restore themselves to equilibrium after the disruption has passed. (In a conductor, the equilibrium can be restored without emitting a photon.) In normal circumstances, these photons destructively interfere with each other and no radiation is detected. However, if the disruption travels faster than the photons themselves travel, as when a charged particle exceeds the speed of light in that medium, the photons constructively interfere and intensify the observed radiation. The result (analogous to a sonic boom) is known as ?erenkov radiation.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_light


Anyway, I am not a physics professor....but doing my best to understand it all
If anybody has suggestions, please write them down , here ;)


Br
Steve

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Re: The final step towards running an engine on Hydroxy
« Reply #23 on: May 28, 2008, 11:04:28 am »
stevie, Ive made some simple test with 10 violet LEDS at 400nm. I saw no visible difference in the gas nor when i attempted to ignite it...

I still think we should further test this by pulsing the LED's and using a lot of them.

CN,

Can you tell me more on how you did your test? What was your setup?
Can you send me the datasheet of your LEDS?

br
Steve