Author Topic: Fusion energy  (Read 230 times)

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Fusion energy
« on: November 01, 2019, 17:23:33 pm »
Why no one wants to deal with nuclear fusion which is in my opinion the only real free energy source, our Sun does it 24/7, there's nothing impossible about nuclear fusion, the only difficulty is in making a machine which can simulate the same conditions and fields as the sun, the two big contenders that use magnetic fields are the tomahawk style and polywell/fusor type machines and then there are the laser types machines, the tomahawk is nearly impossible to succeed, the polywell won't be backed up to do a full scale model and no FEM simulation can model millions of particles which alter the voltage field of this fusor style machine, I am talking about boron 13  and alpha particle fusion which require high plasma temperature aka strong forces in order to be self sustaining - the tritium fusion which most countries are trying to achieve must be mined from the Moon, so that's a no no. The polywell won't succeed because they use ribs to simulate a spherical shell that pushes the ions together like the sun's gravity and the voids between the ribs are where all the particles escape from, the tomahawk is actually creating and driving two beams of particles against each other like in a car crash which is also impossible to make since the void between each particle is way too large and the particles decelerate before they can hit a target. The laser type machines shoot a solid target with high energy laser which knocks off the ion particle and hit another target but then there are isssues with having to replenish the solid target and the limit of laser power.

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Re: Fusion energy
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2019, 02:07:10 am »
Why no one wants to deal with nuclear fusion which is in my opinion the only real free energy source, our Sun does it 24/7, there's nothing impossible about nuclear fusion, the only difficulty is in making a machine which can simulate the same conditions and fields as the sun,

We also have something called electron catalysis.  When an electron comes between a proton and some other positive particle, the Coulomb Barrier is cancelled out.  Neither high temperature nor extreme pressure is then needed for colliding particles to fuse.  These electrons are found in low energy neutral plasmas which are flame like.

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Re: Fusion energy
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2019, 00:41:41 am »
Why no one wants to deal with nuclear fusion which is in my opinion the only real free energy source, our Sun does it 24/7, there's nothing impossible about nuclear fusion, the only difficulty is in making a machine which can simulate the same conditions and fields as the sun,

We also have something called electron catalysis.  When an electron comes between a proton and some other positive particle, the Coulomb Barrier is cancelled out.  Neither high temperature nor extreme pressure is then needed for colliding particles to fuse.  These electrons are found in low energy neutral plasmas which are flame like.

Never heard of that before, how does the coulomb barrier cancel out?  It could happen for a certain distance and the particles would need to be aligned which is almost impossible to do in particle physics but again what would probably happen is that one of the two positive particles would grab the electron.

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Re: Fusion energy
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2019, 03:51:02 am »
The electron in a Hydrogen atom doesn't orbit the nucleus in the normal sence.  It's position is based on statistical probability.  Nothing says it has to be in adjacent positions from one moment to the next.  Some of the higher orbitals are even split between two non connected regions, with the electron able to jump from any point to any other point in either region, from moment to moment.  Sometimes, the electron's position is inside the proton itself.  In this case, fusion makes the electron's charge neutralizing internal position permanent, allowing two Hydrogen ions to produce a Deuterium nucleus, with one proton and one neutron. 

Regardless of the electron's shielding position in a given reaction, presence of ionizing radiation prevents the ions from reverting to normal atoms.

Also, this 'e-cat' (electron catalysis) should not be confused with Rossi's 'E-cat', which stands for Energy catalysis.  (This was his Cold Fusion reactor which supposedly converted a manufactured synthesized Nickle isotope into Copper).

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Re: Fusion energy
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2019, 11:00:28 am »
The electron in a Hydrogen atom doesn't orbit the nucleus in the normal sence.  It's position is based on statistical probability.  Nothing says it has to be in adjacent positions from one moment to the next.  Some of the higher orbitals are even split between two non connected regions, with the electron able to jump from any point to any other point in either region, from moment to moment.  Sometimes, the electron's position is inside the proton itself.  In this case, fusion makes the electron's charge neutralizing internal position permanent, allowing two Hydrogen ions to produce a Deuterium nucleus, with one proton and one neutron. 

Regardless of the electron's shielding position in a given reaction, presence of ionizing radiation prevents the ions from reverting to normal atoms.

Also, this 'e-cat' (electron catalysis) should not be confused with Rossi's 'E-cat', which stands for Energy catalysis.  (This was his Cold Fusion reactor which supposedly converted a manufactured synthesized Nickle isotope into Copper).

An electron and a proton can't be in the same time in the same place, there are certain orbitals depending on the energy the electron has that they take, so what you're saying is that the proton is a hollow particle and the electron has another orbital that no one has found out about that's inside the hollow proton but the hydrogen atom is the most studied in QM with many experiments I doubt no one would have found out the proton is hollow and the electron has an orbital that is lower than the zero orbital. Orbitals are statistical functions that have cusp like graphs which means that the chance of finding the particle outside the high probability region is almost zero.

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Re: Fusion energy
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2019, 12:27:38 pm »
Here's a link to a good article which discusses the amount of time an electron spends inside a proton:

https://www.quantamagazine.org/physicists-finally-nail-the-protons-size-and-hope-dies-20190911/

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Re: Fusion energy
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2019, 21:02:25 pm »
Here's a link to a good article which discusses the amount of time an electron spends inside a proton:

https://www.quantamagazine.org/physicists-finally-nail-the-protons-size-and-hope-dies-20190911/

Well it's possible but the probability is quite low, I've found the calculations for this and it's like 0.0000000000000001 % probable.

https://diego.assencio.com/?index=ec0bf1e2547df878846dd841b8d657b2 still better chances than winning the lottery.

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Re: Fusion energy
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2019, 21:25:35 pm »
The quantum behavior of orbital electrons isn't the same as that of free electrons moving under the influence of electrical fields.  Two closely spaced protons might actually pull an electron into the cancellation region, if the plasma electron temperature isn't too high.  Trying to get fusion with ultra high temperature might be making the quest harder than it needs to be.  I remember reading in the Bible that when the Prophet Ezekiel saw a wheel within a wheel come down from the sky, he also saw a vision of a flame infolding on itself.  This is a good description of my plasmoid fusion experiment.

Still, there are Inventors who have claimed deuterium production from Hydrogen.  Even the production of Helium.  So, somehow, an electron is getting inside a proton at least some of the time, for neutron formation.