Author Topic: Can it be so simple?  (Read 110 times)

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Can it be so simple?
« on: August 28, 2019, 09:41:34 am »
I have a question. I need some sort of confirmation of you guy,s, here on our forum.
Its about the following setup:
A two electrode watercell connected to ground and also a coil connected to ground.
Both hooked up to a pulsing DC.
You will create resonance.
The question is if the cell stays polarised because it is connected to ground.?

Just past this code in the falstadt simulator and play with it.
You will see very high voltage peaks across the cell.

https://www.falstad.com/circuit/

$ 0 0.000005 11.086722712598126 50 5 50
c 112 208 112 288 0 1.0000000000000001e-7 1.0745206956359044e-9
l 208 208 208 288 0 0.1 2.7158390326613247e-12
w 112 208 160 208 0
w 160 208 208 208 0
w 112 288 160 288 0
w 160 288 208 288 0
g 160 288 160 336 0
w 160 208 160 160 0
s 160 160 320 160 0 1 true
R 320 160 432 160 0 0 40 5 0 0 0.5
r 160 208 160 288 0 20000
o 0 64 0 4107 0.3125 0.000390625 0 2 0 3
o 1 64 0 4107 0.3125 0.000390625 1 2 1 3

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Re: Can it be so simple?
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2019, 03:19:35 am »
With this configuration the coil is in parallel with the capacitive cell, so they'll act as a tank circuit.  This means, at resonance the potential will rise and fall, becoming zero at some point in each cycle.  However, the water molecules are also non local capacitors and they should retain some amount of polarization since the applied signal is broken by a spark (in the switch).  The collapsing spark produces spikes which are not resonant, and additive.